The chief priests and Scribes wanted Jesus (Lk 20:19-20:19)

“The chief priests

And the Scribes

Wanted

To lay hands

On Jesus

At that very hour.

But they feared

The people.”

 

Καὶ ἐζήτησαν οἱ γραμματεῖς καὶ οἱ ἀρχιερεῖς ἐπιβαλεῖν ἐπ’ αὐτὸν τὰς χεῖρας ἐν αὐτῇ τῇ ὥρᾳ, καὶ ἐφοβήθησαν τὸν λαόν

 

Luke said that the Scribes (οἱ γραμματεῖς) and the chief priests (καὶ οἱ ἀρχιερεῖς) wanted to lay hands on Jesus (Καὶ ἐζήτησαν…ἐπιβαλεῖν ἐπ’ αὐτὸν τὰς χεῖρας) at that very hour (ἐν αὐτῇ τῇ ὥρᾳ,).  However, they feared the people (καὶ ἐφοβήθησαν τὸν λαόν).  There is something similar in Matthew chapter 21:46, and Mark, chapter 12:12.  However, there are different groups named in each gospel. Mark said that the unnamed “they” were trying or seeking to get a hold of or arrest Jesus (Καὶ ἐζήτουν αὐτὸν κρατῆσαι).  However, they were afraid of the crowd (καὶ ἐφοβήθησαν τὸν ὄχλον).  Thus, they left him (καὶ ἀφέντες αὐτὸν) and went away (ἀπῆλθον).  Matthew said that the chief priests and the Pharisees wanted to arrest or seize Jesus (καὶ ζητοῦντες αὐτὸν κρατῆσαι).  However, they feared the crowds (ἐφοβήθησαν τοὺς ὄχλους) who regarded him as if he were a prophet (ἐπεὶ εἰς προφήτην αὐτὸν εἶχον).  In fact, the idea of Jesus as a prophet still exists until today, but Matthew was the only one who called him a prophet.  Luke had named the chief priests and the Scribes, but not the Pharisees, the Sadducees, the elders or presbyters.  Mark simply used the vague “they”.  Matthew, on the other hand, had the chief priests and the Pharisees seeking Jesus, but not the Scribes, the Sadducees, the elders or presbyters.  This was an assertion that the various Jewish religious leaders were out to get Jesus.  Are you out to get anyone?

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Curing people (Lk 7:21-7:21)

“Jesus had just then

Cured many people

Of diseases,

Of severe afflictions,

And of evil spirits.

He had given sight

To many

Who were blind.”

 

ἐν ἐκείνῃ τῇ ὥρᾳ ἐθεράπευσεν πολλοὺς ἀπὸ νόσων καὶ μαστίγων καὶ πνευμάτων πονηρῶν, καὶ τυφλοῖς πολλοῖς ἐχαρίσατο βλέπειν.

 

Luke has an introductory comment that was not in Matthew, before he gave the response of Jesus.  Luke stated that at that very hour (ἐν ἐκείνῃ τῇ ὥρᾳ), Jesus had just then cured or healed many people (ἐθεράπευσεν πολλοὺς) of diseases (ἀπὸ νόσων), of severe afflictions (καὶ μαστίγων), and of evil spirits (καὶ πνευμάτων πονηρῶν).  He had given sight to many blind people (καὶ τυφλοῖς πολλοῖς ἐχαρίσατο βλέπειν).  In other words, Jesus was a miracle worker.  Have you ever seen a miracle worker?

 

The slave was well (Lk 7:10-7:10)

“When those

Who had been sent

Returned

To the house,

They found the slave

In good health.”

 

καὶ ὑποστρέψαντες εἰς τὸν οἶκον οἱ πεμφθέντες εὗρον τὸν δοῦλον ὑγιαίνοντα.

 

Luke said that those friends of the centurion, who had been sent to Jesus (οἱ πεμφθέντες), returned to the centurion’s house (καὶ ὑποστρέψαντες εἰς τὸν οἶκον).  There, they found the slave in good health (εὗρον τὸν δοῦλον ὑγιαίνοντα).  There is a slightly different ending to this healing of the centurion’s servant in Matthew, chapter 8:13, where Jesus talked about the failure of the sons of Abraham.  He then told the centurion to go home.  The healing was going to take place as he had believed that it would.  Simply the word of Jesus, not his presence would cure his servant.  Then Matthew indicated that at that very moment, at that very hour, the servant was healed, without the presence of Jesus.  In both gospel stories, the servant was healed without Jesus being physically present to do so, due to the great faith of this non-Israelite Roman centurion person.  What kind of faith do you have?

Jesus cures the woman of faith (Mt 9:22-9:22)

“Jesus turned.

Seeing her,

He said.

‘Take heart!

Daughter!

Your faith

Has made you well.’

Instantly,

The woman

Was made well.”

 

ὁ δὲ Ἰησοῦς στραφεὶς καὶ ἰδὼν αὐτὴν εἶπεν Θάρσει, θύγατερ· ἡ πίστις σου σέσωκέν σε. καὶ ἐσώθη ἡ γυνὴ ἀπὸ τῆς ὥρας ἐκείνης.

 

This healing is pretty much the same as can be found in Mark, chapter 5:30-34, and Luke, chapter 8:45-48, where he realized that power had gone forth from him.  Jesus then turned around (ὁ δὲ Ἰησοῦς στραφεὶς).  He saw her (καὶ ἰδὼν αὐτὴν) and realized what she was thinking.  Like the other times earlier, Jesus said that her faith had saved or cured her (ἡ πίστις σου σέσωκέν σε).  He called her “daughter (θύγατερ).”  He told her to have courage and take heart (εἶπεν Θάρσει).  With that, this woman was cured at that very hour (καὶ ἐσώθη ἡ γυνὴ ἀπὸ τῆς ὥρας ἐκείνης).  Faith is a key ingredient in all these healings.

The healing of the centurion’s servant (Mt 8:13-8:13)

“Jesus said

To the centurion.

‘Go!

Let it be done

For you

According to your faith.’

The servant

Was healed

At that very hour.”

 

καὶ εἶπεν ὁ Ἰησοῦς τῷ ἑκατοντάρχῃ Ὕπαγε, ὡς ἐπίστευσας γενηθήτω σοι. καὶ ἰάθη ὁ παῖς ἐν τῇ ὥρᾳ ἐκείνῃ.

 

There is a slightly different ending to this healing of the centurion’s servant in Luke, chapter 7:10.  Here there is an emphasis on the faith of the centurion.  Jesus told the centurion (καὶ εἶπεν ὁ Ἰησοῦς τῷ ἑκατοντάρχῃ) to go home (Ὕπαγε), because the healing was going to take place as he had believed that it would (ὡς ἐπίστευσας γενηθήτω σοι.).  Simply the word of Jesus, not his presence would cure his servant.  Then Matthew indicated that at that very moment, at that very hour (ἐν τῇ ὥρᾳ ἐκείνῃ), the servant was healed (καὶ ἰάθη ὁ παῖς), without the presence of Jesus.