The Temple servants returning (Neh 7:46-7:56)

“The temple servants were the descendents of Ziha, the descendents of Hasupha, the descendents of Tabbaoth, the descendents of Keros, the descendents of Sia, the descendents of Padon, the descendents of Lebana, the descendents of Hagaba, the descendents of Shalmai, the descendents of Hanan, the descendents of Giddel, the descendents of Gahar, the descendents of Reaiah, the descendents of Rezin, the descendents of Nekoda, the descendents of Gazzam, the descendents of Uzza, the descendents of Paseah, the descendents of Besai, the descendents of Meunim, the descendents of Nephushesim, the descendents of Bakbuk, the descendents of Hakupha, the descendents of Harhur, the descendents of Bazlith, the descendents of Mehida, the descendents of Harsha, the descendents of Barkos, the descendents of Sisera, the descendents of Temah, the descendents of Neziah, and the descendents of Hatipha.”

This is the list of the hereditary Temple servants, the Nethinim, people dedicated to the Temple. Often they were not Israelites, but captured slave laborers given to the Temple. They became hereditary slaves dedicated to the Temple. However, there was no Temple, so it is not clear why they were returning.   Thus these names were not common biblical names since most of these names only appear here and in Ezra, but nowhere else in the biblical literature. Of the 35 temple servants, 27 names are exactly the same as in Ezra, chapter 2. The minor exceptions are Sia for Siaha, Lebana for Lebanah, Hagaba for Hagabah, Nephushesim for Nephisim, and Bazlith for Bazluth. Akkub, Hagab, and Asnah were in Ezra, but are not here.

The list of the Temple servants returning (Ezra 2:43-2:54)

“The temple servants were the descendents of Ziha, Hasupha, Tabbaoth, Keros, Siaha, Padon, Lebanah, Hagabah, Akkub, Hagab, Shamlai, Hanan, Giddel, Gahar, Reaiah, Rezin, Nekoda, Gazzam, Uzza, Paseah, Besai, Asnah, Meunim, Nephisim, Bakbuk, Hakupha, Harhur, Bazluth, Mehida, Harsha, Barkos, Sisera, Temah, Neziah, and Hatipha.”

This is the list of the hereditary Temple servants, the Nethinim, people dedicated to the Temple. Often they were not Israelites, but captured slave laborers given to the Temple. Thus they became hereditary slaves dedicated to the Temple. However, there is no Temple, so it is not clear why they were returning. Most of these names only appear here and in Nehemiah but nowhere else in the biblical literature. Akkub and Uzza appear as a name for 3 other biblical persons. There was a King Rezin of Damascus who invaded Judah, but this is not him. There also was a Sisera who was the warrior killed in his sleep in Josiah. Otherwise, these were not common biblical names.

 

The sons of Ehud (1 Chr 8:6-8:7)

“These are the sons of Ehud. They were the heads of the ancestral houses of the inhabitants of Geba. They were carried into exile to Manahath. They were Naaman, Ahijah, and Gera, that is, Heglam, who was the father of Uzza and Ahihud.”

This Ehud, son of Gera, may be the judge in Judges, chapter 3. Apparently, this family or clan settled in Geba, which was a Levite city in Benjamin, about 6 miles north of Jerusalem. They were taken into exile in the 6th century BCE to Manahath, which actually seems like a place in Judah. One of the leaders of this clan was (1) Naaman, mentioned in Numbers, chapter 26, or maybe a brother of Gera. There were 7 different biblical people with the name of (2) Ahijah. The most famous Ahijah was a prophet of Shiloh in the days of King Rehoboam in 1 Kings, chapters 11 and 14. (3) Gera is somehow Heglam, but this is the only mention of Heglam. There are 3 other people with the name of Uzza, but there is also one other Ahihud.

The death of King Amon (2 Kings 21:23-21:26)

“The servants of King Amon conspired against him. They killed the king in his house. However, the people of the land killed all those who had conspired against King Amon. The people of the land made his son Josiah king in place of him. Now the rest of the acts of Amon that he did, are they not written in the Book of the Annals of the Kings of Judah? He was buried in his tomb in the garden of Uzza. Then his son King Josiah succeeded him.”

Once again, there is no explanation of why this uprising and conspiracy took place. There is not a hint that Yahweh was responsible one way or another. It just happened. However, this was not popular so that the king’s servants or consultants were also killed by the people of the land. They took his young son Josiah and made him king since King Amon was only 24 years old when he died. However, he still has a place in the lost “Book of the Annals of the Kings of Judah.” King Amon was buried with his father, King Manasseh, in their Uzza palace garden. Long live the new King Josiah.

The death of King Manasseh (2 Kings 21:17-21:18)

“Now the rest of the acts of King Manasseh, all that he did, and the sin that he committed, are they not written in the Book of the Annals of the Kings of Judah? King Manasseh slept with his ancestors. He was buried in the garden of his house, in the garden of Uzza. His son King Amon succeeded him.”

For more information about the wicked King Manasseh, check with the lost “Book of the Annals of the Kings of Judah.” King Manasseh died and was buried in his own garden, but not with his ancestors. His son King Amon took over for him. Let’s see what happens to him. Interesting enough, there was no individual retribution for Manasseh, despite all his evil ways. Other kings suffered either themselves or their families for less serious sins. Despite his anger with King Manasseh, Yahweh left him along personally. Rather Yahweh seemed more displeased with the people of Judah and Jerusalem rather than Manasseh himself.