People listen to Jesus (Lk 5:15-5:15)

“But now,

More than ever,

The word

About Jesus

Spread abroad.

Many crowds

Would gather

To hear him.

He cured many

Of their diseases.”

 

διήρχετο δὲ μᾶλλον ὁ λόγος περὶ αὐτοῦ, καὶ συνήρχοντο ὄχλοι πολλοὶ ἀκούειν καὶ θεραπεύεσθαι ἀπὸ τῶν ἀσθενειῶν αὐτῶν

 

This is more or less a unique saying of Luke, who said that now, more than ever, the word or report about Jesus spread abroad (διήρχετο δὲ μᾶλλον ὁ λόγος περὶ αὐτοῦ,).  Many large crowds would gather to hear him (καὶ συνήρχοντο ὄχλοι πολλοὶ ἀκούειν).  Then he cured many people of their diseases (αὶ θεραπεύεσθαι ἀπὸ τῶν ἀσθενειῶν αὐτῶν).  There is nothing like this in MatthewMark, chapter 1:45, on the other hand, said that after this cleansed leper went away, he began to proclaim what had happened to him.  Then the news about his cleansing spread around, so that Jesus was no longer able to openly enter into a city or town.  He had to stay out in the solitary deserted countryside.  Nevertheless, the people came to him from all around the area or from various quarters.  The cleansed leper did not keep quiet, so that this led to more consternation for Jesus.  Luke was not that explicit, but hinted at it.

Make proper collections (Lk 3:13-3:13)

“John said to them.

‘Collect no more

Than the amount

Prescribed for you!’”

 

ὁ δὲ εἶπεν πρὸς αὐτούς Μηδὲν πλέον παρὰ τὸ διατεταγμένον ὑμῖν πράσσετε.

 

Luke had John respond to these tax collectors with another unique saying.  Only Luke said that John told the tax collectors (ὁ δὲ εἶπεν πρὸς αὐτούς) that they were to collect no more than the amount prescribed for them (Μηδὲν πλέον παρὰ τὸ διατεταγμένον ὑμῖν πράσσετε).  John simply wanted them to do their job.  Apparently, many of these tax collectors would overcharge people and keep the difference.  Everyone was aware of this somewhat common corrupt practice.  John seemed to call for honesty and justice among these Jewish Roman tax collectors.

Salvation of God (Lk 3:6-3:6)

“All flesh

Will see

The salvation

Of God.”

 

καὶ ὄψεται πᾶσα σὰρξ τὸ σωτήριον τοῦ Θεοῦ.

 

Luke concluded his quote of Isaiah with the saying that all flesh will see (καὶ ὄψεται πᾶσα σὰρξ) the salvation of God (τὸ σωτήριον τοῦ Θεοῦ).  However, that is not from Isaiah who said that the glory of Yahweh would be revealed.  All the people would see it together.  I suppose that the intent is pretty much the same.  Deutero-Isaiah was talking about Yahweh saving his people from Babylon.  Thus, this might be considered a unique saying of Luke.

The twelve-year old (Lk 2:42-2:42

“When Jesus was

Twelve years old,

They went up

As usual

For the festival.”

 

Καὶ ὅτε ἐγένετο ἐτῶν δώδεκα, ἀναβαινόντων αὐτῶν κατὰ τὸ ἔθος τῆς ἑορτῆς,

 

Now we have another unique saying of Luke about the age of Jesus.  When Jesus was 12 years old (Καὶ ὅτε ἐγένετο ἐτῶν δώδεκα), the whole family went up to Jerusalem (ἀναβαινόντων αὐτῶν) as usual for the festival of Passover (κατὰ τὸ ἔθος τῆς ἑορτῆς).  This was not a bar mitzvah or confirmation, since this Jewish practice came later.  However, Jesus would have been on the verge of puberty.  The number 12 would play a major role in the life of Jesus, since he had 12 apostles, who were called the Twelve.  This episode is the only insight into the life of Jesus between his birth and the baptism by John, that can be found in any of the canonical biblical gospel narratives.  There are many stories about the boyhood of Jesus in some apocryphal gospels.  Thus, this story takes on a special canonical importance.

Their testimony did not agree (Mk 14:59-14:59)

“But even on this point,

Their testimony

Did not agree.”

 

καὶ οὐδὲ οὕτως ἴση ἦν ἡ μαρτυρία αὐτῶν.

 

This is a unique saying of Mark.  He indicated that even on this point about the destruction of the Temple and the rebuilding of it, the testimony of these accusers did not agree (καὶ οὐδὲ οὕτως ἴση ἦν ἡ μαρτυρία αὐτῶν).  In other words, Mark said that they had no case against Jesus, because they needed to have 2 witnesses who would agree on a charge.

Be vigilant! (Mk 13:37-13:37)

“What I say

To you,

I say to all.

‘Be vigilant!”

 

ὃ δὲ ὑμῖν λέγω, πᾶσιν λέγω, γρηγορεῖτε.

 

Mark continued with another unique saying of Jesus about being vigilant, a continual theme.  Jesus said to all of them (ὃ δὲ ὑμῖν λέγω, πᾶσιν λέγω) just be vigilant, watchful, alert, or awake (γρηγορεῖτε), no sleeping on the job!

Peter remembered the curse (Mk 11:21-11:21)

“Then Peter

Remembered it.

He said

To Jesus.

‘Rabbi!

Look!

The fig tree

That you cursed

Has withered.’”

 

καὶ ἀναμνησθεὶς ὁ Πέτρος λέγει αὐτῷ Ῥαββεί, ἴδε ἡ συκῆ ἣν κατηράσω ἐξήρανται

 

This is a unique saying of Mark.  Peter, as the leader of the 12 apostles, remembered (καὶ ἀναμνησθεὶς ὁ Πέτρος) about what had happened the day before.  He then called Jesus “Rabbi” (λέγει αὐτῷ Ῥαββεί).  He told Jesus to look at the cursed fig tree from the previous day that had already withered (ἴδε ἡ συκῆ ἣν κατηράσω ἐξήραντα).  For Mark, it took a day, but for Matthew, it was immediate.

 

Jesus leaves Jerusalem (Mk 11:19-11:19)

“When evening came.

Jesus

And his disciples

Went out

Of the city.”

 

Καὶ ὅταν ὀψὲ ἐγένετο, ἐξεπορεύοντο ἔξω τῆς πόλεως.

 

This is a unique saying of Mark, but not inconsistent with the other gospel stories.  When evening came (Καὶ ὅταν ὀψὲ ἐγένετο), Jesus and his disciples went out of the city (ἐξεπορεύοντο ἔξω τῆς πόλεως).  Notice that they left Jerusalem at night, probably going to Bethany, which was not far away and where they felt safe.

Keep the Temple clean (Mk 11:16-11:16)

“Jesus would not allow

Anyone to carry anything

Through the Temple.”

 

καὶ οὐκ ἤφιεν ἵνα τις διενέγκῃ σκεῦος διὰ τοῦ ἱεροῦ,

 

This seems to be a unique saying of Mark, who said that Jesus would not allow or permit (καὶ οὐκ ἤφιεν) anyone to carry anything like a vessel (ἵνα τις διενέγκῃ σκεῦος) through the Temple (διὰ τοῦ ἱεροῦ).  In his attempt to clean up the Temple, Jesus did not want anything being carried around in the Temple.

The blind man went to Jesus (Mk 10:50-10:50)

“Throwing off

His cloak,

He sprang up.

He went to Jesus.”

 

ὁ δὲ ἀποβαλὼν τὸ ἱμάτιον αὐτοῦ ἀναπηδήσας ἦλθεν πρὸς τὸν Ἰησοῦν.

 

This is a unique saying of Mark.  Upon hearing that Jesus wanted to see him, Bartimaeus, the blind beggar, threw off his cloak or coat (ὁ δὲ ἀποβαλὼν τὸ ἱμάτιον αὐτοῦ).  He rose up or sprang up (ἀναπηδήσας) and went to Jesus (ἦλθεν πρὸς τὸν Ἰησοῦν).  He reacted very favorably to the request from Jesus and his disciples.