They did not understand (Lk 18:34-18:34)

“But the twelve apostles

Understood

Nothing about

All these things.

In fact,

What he said

Was hidden

From them.

They did not grasp

What was said.”

 

καὶ αὐτοὶ οὐδὲν τούτων συνῆκαν, καὶ ἦν τὸ ῥῆμα τοῦτο κεκρυμμένον ἀπ’ αὐτῶν, καὶ οὐκ ἐγίνωσκον τὰ λεγόμενα.

 

Luke uniquely added that 12 apostles did not understood anything about all these things (καὶ αὐτοὶ οὐδὲν τούτων συνῆκαν) about his future death and resurrection.  In fact, what Jesus said was hidden from them (καὶ ἦν τὸ ῥῆμα τοῦτο κεκρυμμένον ἀπ’ αὐτῶν), because they did not grasp what he said (καὶ οὐκ ἐγίνωσκον τὰ λεγόμενα).  Despite Jesus’ attempt to inform his elite 12 apostles, they still did not understand what he was talking about.  This is somewhat similar to earlier in chapter 9:45, where Luke said that the disciples did not understand this saying of Jesus (οἱ δὲ ἠγνόουν τὸ ῥῆμα τοῦτο), because its meaning was veiled or concealed from them (καὶ ἦν παρακεκαλυμμένον ἀπ’ αὐτῶν).  Thus, they could not comprehend it (ἵνα μὴ αἴσθωνται αὐτό).  However, they were afraid (καὶ ἐφοβοῦντο) to ask Jesus (ἐρωτῆσαι αὐτὸν) about the meaning of this saying (περὶ τοῦ ῥήματος τούτου).  This saying about the reaction of the disciples can also be found in Matthew, chapter 17:23, and Mark, chapter 9:32.  Mark, like Luke, said that the disciples did not understand what Jesus was talking about.  They were afraid to ask or question him about this.  Once again, Mark indicated that the disciples did not seem to understand everything that was going on around them.  Matthew, on the other hand, said that on hearing this, the disciples were greatly vexed, pained, or distressed, since this was shocking news to them.  Do you always understand what Jesus is talking about?

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Jesus was preaching the good news (Lk 8:1-8:1)

“Soon afterward,

Jesus went traveling

Through cities

And villages.

He was preaching

And bringing

The good news

Of the kingdom

Of God.

The twelve apostles

Were with him.”

 

Καὶ ἐγένετο ἐν τῷ καθεξῆς καὶ αὐτὸς διώδευεν κατὰ πόλιν καὶ κώμην κηρύσσων καὶ εὐαγγελιζόμενος τὴν βασιλείαν τοῦ Θεοῦ, καὶ οἱ δώδεκα σὺν αὐτῷ,

 

Luke uniquely said that soon after naming his apostles (Καὶ ἐγένετο ἐν τῷ καθεξῆς), Jesus went traveling through the various cities and villages (καὶ αὐτὸς διώδευεν κατὰ πόλιν καὶ κώμην).  He was preaching (κηρύσσων) by proclaiming the good news (καὶ εὐαγγελιζόμενος) about the kingdom of God (τὴν βασιλείαν τοῦ Θεοῦ).  His newly named Twelve apostles were with him also (καὶ οἱ δώδεκα σὺν αὐτῷ).  While there is no explicit mention of this elsewhere, the other gospels often said that Jesus went from place to place preaching the good news of the kingdom of God with his apostles and disciples.  Do you think that people should go from place to place preaching about the good news of the kingdom of God?

Is it I? (Mk 14:19-14:19)

“The twelve apostles

Began

To be distressed.

They said to Jesus.

One after another.

‘Surely!

Not I!’”

 

ἤρξαντο λυπεῖσθαι καὶ λέγειν αὐτῷ εἷς κατὰ εἷς Μήτι ἐγώ;

 

This is similar to Matthew, chapter 26:22, and something similar to Luke, chapter 22:23, and John, chapter 13:22.  The 12 apostles began to be greatly distressed or pained (ἤρξαντο λυπεῖσθαι) on hearing that one of them was going to betray Jesus.  They said to Jesus, one after another (καὶ λέγειν αὐτῷ εἷς κατὰ εἷς) that it was surely not any of them.  Each one declared in the first person singular “Surely!  Not I! (Μήτι ἐγώ)!”  Mark did not have them say “Lord!” as Matthew indicated.

Jesus entered Jerusalem and the Temple (Mk 11:11-11:11)

“Then Jesus

Entered Jerusalem.

He went

Into the Temple.

When he had looked around

At everything,

As it was already late,

He went out

To Bethany

With the twelve.”

 

Καὶ εἰσῆλθεν εἰς Ἱεροσόλυμα εἰς τὸ ἱερόν· καὶ περιβλεψάμενος πάντα, ὀψὲ ἤδη οὔσης τῆς ὥρας, ἐξῆλθεν εἰς Βηθανίαν μετὰ τῶν δώδεκα.

 

This generic remark about Jesus entering Jerusalem and the Temple is in stark contrast with Matthew, chapter 21:30, where he said that the whole city was in turmoil or stirred up wondering who was this man entering the city was.  Matthew emphasized that Jesus was from Galilee, the north, rather than a Judean or a southerner.  Mark said, in a more descriptive simple manner, that Jesus simply entered Jerusalem (Καὶ εἰσῆλθεν εἰς Ἱεροσόλυμα) and the Temple (εἰς τὸ ἱερόν).  He just looked around at everything (καὶ περιβλεψάμενος πάντα).  There was nothing spectacular about the arrival of Jesus and his apostles.  Since it was already a late hour (ὀψὲ ἤδη οὔσης τῆς ὥρας), he went out to Bethany (ἐξῆλθεν εἰς Βηθανίαν) with his twelve apostles (μετὰ τῶν δώδεκα).  There they probably spent the night, since it was only about a mile and a half east of Jerusalem.  This was the same city of Lazarus and his sisters, Mary and Martha, but there was no mention of them here.

Judas arrives (Mt 26:47-26:47)

“While Jesus

Was still speaking,

Judas,

One of the twelve apostles,

Arrived.

With him

Was a large crowd

With swords

And clubs.

They were sent

From the chief priests

And the elders

Of the people.”

 

Καὶ ἔτι αὐτοῦ λαλοῦντος, ἰδοὺ Ἰούδας εἷς τῶν δώδεκα ἦλθεν, καὶ μετ’ αὐτοῦ ὄχλος πολὺς μετὰ μαχαιρῶν καὶ ξύλων ἀπὸ τῶν ἀρχιερέων καὶ πρεσβυτέρων τοῦ λαοῦ.

 

This is almost word for word in Mark, chapter 14:43.  Luke, chapter 22:47, is somewhat similar, while John, chapter 18:2-3, is more detailed.  Both Mark and Matthew said that while Jesus was still speaking (Καὶ ἔτι αὐτοῦ λαλοῦντος), Judas, one of the 12 apostles, arrived (ἰδοὺ Ἰούδας εἷς τῶν δώδεκα ἦλθεν).  He had with him a large crowd of people (καὶ μετ’ αὐτοῦ ὄχλος πολὺς) with swords and clubs (μετὰ μαχαιρῶν) sent by the chief priests and the elders or presbyters of the people (καὶ ξύλων ἀπὸ τῶν ἀρχιερέων καὶ πρεσβυτέρων τοῦ λαοῦ).  Apparently, these leaders were expecting some resistance from Jesus and his followers.  Thus, they sent a large armed group of people with Judas.  In John’s more descriptive account, Judas knew where to find Jesus because they had often been there at this place.  He said that they also brought lanterns and torches.

 

The list of the first four major apostles (Mt 10:2-10:4)

“These are the names

Of the twelve apostles.

First, Simon,

Also known as Peter,

And his brother Andrew.

James,

The son of Zebedee,

And his brother John.”

 

Τῶν δὲ δώδεκα ἀποστόλων τὰ ὀνόματά ἐστιν ταῦτα· πρῶτος Σίμων ὁ λεγόμενος Πέτρος καὶ Ἀνδρέας ὁ ἀδελφὸς αὐτοῦ, καὶ Ἰάκωβος ὁ τοῦ Ζεβεδαίου καὶ Ἰωάνης ὁ ἀδελφὸς αὐτοῦ,

 

This section about the names of the 12 apostles is similar to Mark, chapter 3:16-19 and Luke, chapter 6:13-16.  This list can also be compared to the list in the Acts of the Apostles, chapter 1:13.  Notice that they are no longer called the 12 disciples (δώδεκα μαθητὰς) but the 12 apostles (δὲ δώδεκα ἀποστόλων).  They had changed from being mere followers (μαθητὰς) to now being sent out as apostles (ἀποστόλων).  These are names of the 12 apostles (Τῶν δὲ δώδεκα ἀποστόλων τὰ ὀνόματά ἐστιν ταῦτα).  Matthew had already mentioned, in chapter 4:18-22, the first 4 names, but the other names appear here for the first time, except for Matthew the tax collector.  First of all, there was Simon, known as Peter (πρῶτος Σίμων ὁ λεγόμενος Πέτρος), with his brother Andrew (καὶ Ἀνδρέας ὁ ἀδελφὸς αὐτοῦ).  Then the 2 sons of Zebedee (ὁ τοῦ Ζεβεδαίου), James and John (καὶ Ἰάκωβος καὶ Ἰωάνης ὁ ἀδελφὸς αὐτοῦ).  Clearly, these 4 apostles were considered the most important with Peter at the top of this group.  In all the listings, they are always first.  However, Andrew comes after James and John in Mark and in the Acts of the Apostles.