Jesus entered Jerusalem and the Temple (Mk 11:11-11:11)

“Then Jesus

Entered Jerusalem.

He went

Into the Temple.

When he had looked around

At everything,

As it was already late,

He went out

To Bethany

With the twelve.”

 

Καὶ εἰσῆλθεν εἰς Ἱεροσόλυμα εἰς τὸ ἱερόν· καὶ περιβλεψάμενος πάντα, ὀψὲ ἤδη οὔσης τῆς ὥρας, ἐξῆλθεν εἰς Βηθανίαν μετὰ τῶν δώδεκα.

 

This generic remark about Jesus entering Jerusalem and the Temple is in stark contrast with Matthew, chapter 21:30, where he said that the whole city was in turmoil or stirred up wondering who was this man entering the city was.  Matthew emphasized that Jesus was from Galilee, the north, rather than a Judean or a southerner.  Mark said, in a more descriptive simple manner, that Jesus simply entered Jerusalem (Καὶ εἰσῆλθεν εἰς Ἱεροσόλυμα) and the Temple (εἰς τὸ ἱερόν).  He just looked around at everything (καὶ περιβλεψάμενος πάντα).  There was nothing spectacular about the arrival of Jesus and his apostles.  Since it was already a late hour (ὀψὲ ἤδη οὔσης τῆς ὥρας), he went out to Bethany (ἐξῆλθεν εἰς Βηθανίαν) with his twelve apostles (μετὰ τῶν δώδεκα).  There they probably spent the night, since it was only about a mile and a half east of Jerusalem.  This was the same city of Lazarus and his sisters, Mary and Martha, but there was no mention of them here.

Introduction to the story about the king of Babylon (Isa 14:3-14:4)

“When Yahweh has given you rest

From your pain,

From your turmoil,

From your hard service,

With which

You were made to serve,

You will take up this taunt

Against the king of Babylon.”

Many believe that this may have been a taunt by Isaiah against the dead King Sargon II, who died in 705 BCE after ruling from 722 BCE. Later it was used against King Nebuchadnezzar II (605-562 BCE). It assumes that the Israelites had returned from the Exile. They had some rest from their pain, turmoil, and hard service. Now they were able to taunt the king of Babylon.

Asking for forgiveness (Ps 39:6-39:10)

“Surely everyone goes about like a shadow.

Surely for nothing they are in turmoil.

They heap up.

They do not know who will gather!

Now Lord!

What do I wait for?

My hope is in you!

Deliver me from all my transgressions!

Do not make me the scorn of the fool!

I am silent.

I do not open my mouth.

It is you who have done it.

Remove your stroke from me.

I am worn down

By the blows of your hand.”

Everyone is like a shadow since they are in turmoil. They are confused. However, the psalmist is not confused because he is waiting on Yahweh. His hope is in Yahweh. He wants God to forgive his transgressions since he did not want to be the scorn of the fools. This psalmist felt that God had hit him pretty hard with his hands but he had remained silent.