Offer your shirt! (Lk 6:29-6:29)

“From anyone

Who takes away

Your coat

Do not withhold

Even your shirt!”

 

καὶ ἀπὸ τοῦ αἴροντός σου τὸ ἱμάτιον καὶ τὸν χιτῶνα μὴ κωλύσῃς.

 

Luke indicated that Jesus said that if anyone wanted to take away their coat (καὶ ἀπὸ τοῦ αἴροντός σου τὸ ἱμάτιον), they should also offer them their shirt or tunic (καὶ τὸν χιτῶνα μὴ κωλύσῃς).  Once again Luke had Jesus use the second person plural to address his followers.  A similar saying to this can be found in Matthew, chapter 5:40, where he also indicated that the followers of Jesus should be kind people.  We might even call these activities unusual acts of kindness.  In Matthew, Jesus said that not only should they give a person their inner tunic coat (τὸν χιτῶνά σου λαβεῖν), but also their outer cloak as well (ἄφες αὐτῷ καὶ τὸ ἱμάτιον).  This seems like they would give all the clothes off their back, since most people did not own more than 2 coats.  There should be no end to their generosity.

Job turns to his own afflictions (Job 30:16-30:19)

“Now my soul is poured out within me.

The days of affliction have taken hold of me.

The night racks my bones.

The pain that gnaws me takes no rest.

With violence it seizes my garment.

He grasps me by the collar of my tunic.

God has cast me into the mire.

I have become like dust and ashes.”

Job turned inward as he said even his soul was afflicted. His body was racked with pain. He had no rest from this continual pain. It was as like someone had seized him by the collar of his tunic. The pain was devastating to his whole body. God had cast him out into mud. He had become like dust and ashes, of so little value.

The dead Jewish soldiers were idolaters (2 Macc 12:39-12:42)

“On the next day, as had now become necessary, Judas Maccabeus and his men went to take up the bodies of the fallen. He wanted to bring them back to lie with their kindred in the sepulchres of their ancestors. Then under the tunic of every one of the dead they found sacred tokens of the idols of Jamnia, which the law forbids the Jews to wear. It became clear to all that this was the reason that these men had fallen. So they all blessed the ways of the Lord, the righteous judge, who reveals the things that are hidden. They turned to supplication, praying that the sin that had been committed might be wholly blotted out. The noble Judas Maccabeus exhorted the people to keep themselves free from sin. They had seen with their own eyes what had happened as the result of the sin of those who had fallen.”

This is one of the few passages where there seems to be respect for the fallen soldiers, other than the leaders. They went out to pick up the bodies of the dead Jewish fighters so that they could be put in the tomb of their ancestors. To their surprise, they found that all the dead Jewish fighters were wearing the sacred tokens of the idols from Jamnia. How and why they had these tokens was not clear. Of course, this was forbidden to all Jewish people. They then prayed that the sins of these fallen men might be blotted out. Judas Maccabeus reminded them to keep themselves from sin. They had seen with their own eyes what happened to sinners.

The headpiece turban, tunic and sash (Ex 28:36-28:39)

“You shall make a rosette of pure gold, and engrave on it, like the engraving of a signet, ‘Holy to Yahweh.’  You shall fasten it on the turban with a blue cord.  It shall be on the front of the turban.  It shall be on Aaron’s forehead.  Aaron shall take on himself any guilt incurred in the holy offering that the Israelites consecrate as their sacred donations.  It shall always be on his forehead, in order that they may find favor before Yahweh.  You shall make the checkered tunic of fine linen.  You shall make a turban of fine linen.  You shall make a sash embroidered with needlework.”

Linen is used here for the tunic, turban and sash.  However, the turban has an elaborate crown on it, a rosette of pure gold.  A rosette is like a small flower design.  The engraving on it says ‘Holy to Yahweh.’ This little golden crown flower is fastened to the turban with a blue cord.  Thus, it is on the front of the turban on Aaron’s forehead.   Not much is said about the checkered tunic and the sash.

The priestly vestments (Ex 28:1-28:5)

“Then bring near to you your brother Aaron, and his sons with him, from among the Israelites, to serve me as priests.   Aaron and Aaron’s sons, Nadab and Abihu, Eleazar and Ithamar will serve as priests.  You shall make sacred vestments for the glorious adornment of your brother Aaron. You shall speak to all who have ability, whom I have endowed with skill, that they make Aaron’s vestments to consecrate him for my priesthood.  These are the vestments that they shall make: a breastplate, an ephod, a robe, a checkered tunic, a turban, and a sash.  When they make these sacred vestments for your brother Aaron and his sons to serve me as priests, they shall use gold, blue, purple, and crimson yarns and fine linens.”

Aaron and his 4 sons will serve as priests to Yahweh.  There is no mention of Moses’ 2 sons.  Skilled workers were needed to make Aaron’s vestments so that he could be consecrated to the priesthood.  The following are the vestments that will be laid with gold, blue, purple, and crimson yarns and linens: 1) a breastplate, 2) an ephod, 3) a robe, 4) a checkered tunic, 5) a turban, 6) and a sash.