Deism

Deism sees the transcendent God as starting the world and leaving it alone.  This was a common belief in the late 17th and 18th century.  God got things started and then left humans alone to take care of things.  Some of the American founding fathers had this kind of belief in God.

Pantheism

Pantheism is close to polytheism, but goes one step further.  Pantheists proclaim that the transcendent God is imminent in everything.  Everything is divine, since there is no separation between all reality and God.  God is everywhere and in everything.  This is a long way from the monotheism mentioned earlier.

Agnosticism

Agnosticism holds that we cannot know if there is a transcendent God out there or not.  There are a variety of agnostics.  The most common are the practical agnostics.  They act in their lives as if there is no transcendent power.  They are even too lazy to declare that there is no God.  They just act as if there is none.  To the question of whether there is a God or not, they say, “who cares?”  Then there are the intellectual agnostics who says that the question is too difficult, so just leave it alone, since they believe that they can never know if there is a God or not.

Transcendence of God

Transcendent means beyond this material world around us.  Immanent is the opposite, within this world.  This mysterious reality of a transcendent God is not a thing, but a being, a personal being, beyond all personality that is all-powerful and all gentle.  This transcendent mystery may be sometimes contradictory, yet we try to live in harmony and in accord with this unknown.  An encounter with mystery is an experience that we feel is a part of our lives.  Thus, a personal encounter with a personal mystery is an attempt to explain our human relationship with God.  How is reading the Bible an encounter with a transcendent God?