Ten angry men (Mt 20:24-20:24)

“When the ten heard it,

They were angry

With the two brothers.”

 

καὶ ἀκούσαντες οἱ δέκα ἠγανάκτησαν περὶ τῶν δύο ἀδελφῶν.

 

There is something similar to this in Mark, chapter 10:41, but slightly different.  There was a little dissention here.  When the ten other leaders or apostles heard (καὶ ἀκούσαντες οἱ δέκα) about this situation of the sons of Zebedee, James and John, they were angry, incensed, or indignant with these two brothers (ἠγανάκτησαν περὶ τῶν δύο ἀδελφῶν).  Why did they want to be prominent?  What about them?  Were not all the apostles equal?  What made these two so important?

The grieving widow Jerusalem (Bar 4:9-4:12)

“Jerusalem saw

The wrath

That came

Upon you

From God.

She said.

‘Listen!

You neighbors of Zion!

God has brought

Great sorrow

Upon me!

I have seen

The exile

Of my sons.

I have seen

The captivity

Of my daughters,

The Everlasting one

Brought this

Upon them.

With joy,

I nurtured them.

But I sent them away

Weeping

With sorrow.

Let no one rejoice

Over me!

A widow!

I am bereaved of many.

I was left desolate

Because of the sins

Of my children.

Because they turned away

From the law of God.’”

The author of Baruch points out that Jerusalem saw the wrath of God that came upon them first hand. This personified city of Jerusalem said that the neighbors of Zion should listen. God had brought great sorrow on Jerusalem, since her sons and daughters were captured and exiled. The Everlasting One, the name of God used here instead of Yahweh, brought this exile on them. Jerusalem had nurtured them, but she sent them away weeping and in sorrow. No one should rejoice about this situation, since Jerusalem was now a widow, grieving over many people. She had become desolate because of the sins of her children. They had turned away from the law of God.

The punishments (Lam 5:1-5:2)

“Remember!

Yahweh!

What has befallen us!

Behold!

See our disgrace!

Our inheritance

Has been

Turned over

To strangers.

Our homes

Have been

Turned over

To aliens.”

This fifth lament has 22 verses also, but it is not an acrostic poem, since the opening lines do not use the Hebrew alphabet. However, it clearly is a personal lament about Jerusalem, usually attributed to Jeremiah himself. He wanted Yahweh to remember this situation. He wanted Yahweh to see their disgrace. Their inheritance has been given to strangers and aliens who live in their houses.

The reluctant response of Isaiah (Isa 6:5-6:5)

“I said.

‘Woe is me!

I am lost!

I am a man of unclean lips.

I live among a people of unclean lips.

Yet my eyes have seen

The King,

Yahweh of hosts!’”

Isaiah assumes the first personal singular with his response to this situation. He felt that he was lost, since he was a man of unclean lips, living with other unclean people. However, his eyes had seen Yahweh, the king and lord of all. There was a belief that if you saw God, Yahweh, you would die.