The upset king (Dan 3:24-3:25)

“Then King Nebuchadnezzar

Was astonished.

He rose up quickly.

He said to his counselors.

‘Was it not three men

That we threw bound

Into the fire?’

They answered

The king.

‘True!

O king!’

He replied.

‘But I see four men

Unbound,

Walking

In the middle

Of the fire.

They are not hurt.

The fourth one has

The appearance

Of a god.’”

After the long Septuagint prayer of Azariah, we are back at the Hebrew or Aramaic text of the Book of Daniel. Now King Nebuchadnezzar was astonished and upset. He thought that he had put 3 men, tied up, into the furnace. Instead, he saw 4 men, not tied up, walking around in the middle of the furnace. He even remarked that one of them looked like a god, which was the angel.

Doxology of praise to Yahweh (Ps 150:3-150:6)

“Praise him

With trumpet sound!

Praise him

With lute!

Praise him

With harp!

Praise him

With tambourine!

Praise him

With dance!

Praise him

With strings!

Praise him

With pipe!

Praise him

With clanging cymbals;

Praise him

With loud clashing cymbals!

Let everything that breathes

Praise Yahweh!

Praise Yahweh!”

This psalm and the whole book of psalms end with the double phrase “praise Yahweh,” another way of saying alleluia, the Hebrew “Hallelujah.” This doxological praise of God explains how this is done here on earth. The various instruments were to be used in praising Yahweh, the trumpet, the lute, the harp, and the tambourine. There was to be dancing with stringed instruments, playing pipes, and clanging cymbals. Everything that breathes should praise Yahweh. This is a fitting end to a great book of praise to God.

Final psalm (Ps 150:1-150:2)

“Praise Yahweh!

Praise God

In his sanctuary!

Praise him

In his mighty firmament!

Praise him

For his mighty deeds!

Praise him

According to his exceeding greatness!”

Psalm 150 begins with the phrase “praise Yahweh,” another way of saying alleluia, the Hebrew “Hallelujah.” Yahweh is to be praised both in his sanctuary and in the mighty heavens. He is to be praised for his deeds and his greatness.

Israelite festival (Ps 149:1-149:5)

“Praise Yahweh!

Sing to Yahweh a new song!

His praise is due

In the assembly of the faithful!

Let Israel be glad in its maker!

Let the children of Zion rejoice in their King!

Let them praise his name with dancing!

Let them make melody to him

With the tambourine!

Let them make melody to him

With the lyre!

Yahweh takes pleasure in his people.

He adorns the humble with victory.

Let the faithful exult in glory!

Let them sing for joy on their couches!”

Psalm 149 begins with the phrase “praise Yahweh,” another way of saying alleluia, the Hebrew “Hallelujah.” There is no introductory title. The Israelites were to sing a new song in the assembly of the faithful. They should be glad because Yahweh is their creator. They should rejoice with their king. They were to dance and play the tambourine and the lyre. Yahweh was pleased with his people. He would give them glory and victory. Thus they can sing with glory from their couches after their victory.

The wicked are all around us (Ps 12:1-12:2)

To the choirmaster leader, according to the Sheminith, a psalm of David.

“Help!

Yahweh!

There is no longer anyone who is godly.

The faithful have disappeared from humankind.

They utter lies to each other.

They speak

With flattering lips.

They speak

With a double heart.”

Once again, Psalm 12 is another short psalm like Psalm 11. However, there is this note about Sheminith, the Hebrew word for 8th so that it may mean to sing this psalm in an 8th key or octave, perhaps the lowest male note. This generally means a lament as the choirmaster must note this. As usual, this is also a psalm of David. However, there is no mention of stringed instrument like in Psalm 6. There is no mention of the circumstances of David in this short Psalm 12. He clearly wanted Yahweh to help him because there are no more faithful ones, no more godly people around him. Everyone was lying and using double speak. All the faithful ones had disappeared.