The death of King Pekahiah (2 Kings 15:25-15:26)

“Pekah son of Remaliah, his captain, conspired against him with fifty men of the Gileadites. They killed King Pekahiah in Samaria, in the citadel of the palace along with Argob and Atieh. King Pekah killed him, and reigned in place of him. Now the rest of the deeds of King Pekahiah, and all that he did, are written in the Book of the Annals of the Kings of Israel.”

The captain of King Pekahiah conspired against him with 50 other men from Gilead. King Pekah killed him in his own palace with a couple of his friends. For more information check the lost “Book of the Annals of the Kings of Israel.”

The death of King Jeroboam II (2 Kings 14:28-14:29)

“Now the rest of the acts of King Jeroboam, and all that he did, and his might, how he fought, and how he recovered Damascus and Hamath for Israel, which had belonged to Judah, are they not written in the Book of the Annals of the Kings of Israel? King Jeroboam slept with his ancestors, the kings of Israel. His son King Zechariah succeeded him.”

As usual if you want more information the lost “Book of the Annals of the Kings of Israel” will help you. This seems to be a very short summary of 41 years of a long and prosperous reign, when other kings got more attention. Somehow he had control of Damascus, which means that he must have conquered the Arameans. He also had the lands of the east bank, but we do not know how he got them back. Finally he took land from Judah, like his father. He was succeeded by his son King Zechariah.

The death of King Joash of Israel (2 Kings 13:12-13:13)

“Now the rest of the acts of King Joash, and all that he did, as well as the might with which he fought against King Amaziah of Judah, are they not written in the Book of the Annals of the Kings of Israel? So King Joash slept with his ancestors. King Jeroboam sat upon his throne. King Joash was buried in Samaria with the other kings of Israel.”

Once again, you official reference is the lost “Book of the Annals of the Kings of Israel.” Apparently, he had some feuds with the King Amaziah of Judah. Once again, he died and was buried in Samaria, like the other Israelite kings before him.  He was succeeded by his son King Jeroboam II.

 

The kingdom of Jeroboam I (931-910 BCE) (1 Kings 14:19-14:20)

Now the rest of the acts of Jeroboam, how he warred and how he reigned, are written in the Book of the Annals of the Kings of Israel. The time that Jeroboam reigned was twenty-two years. Then he slept with his ancestors. His son Nadab succeeded him.”

The Jerusalem Bible follows the chronology established by Edwin Thiele (1895-1986) in his work, The Mysterious Numbers of the Hebrew Kings (3rd edition in 1983). Thus from now on the dates of the kings will be in parenthesis. However, it must be noted that they might be off by a year or two because of the different new years in the north and south. Also, any exact dating is very difficult. Certainly, they are within 10 years of accuracy, which is really great for 3,000 years ago. The writer of this work also borrowed from the “The Book of the Annals or Chronicles of the Kings,” or “The Annals or Chronicles of the Kings of Israel. This book will be listed for 17 the kings of Israel. Obviously, we do not have this book since it is lost. Many of his wars are there, but the biblical writer did not think them important enough to mention them. Jeroboam reigned for 22 years and then his son Nadab took over. This seems to differ from what the prophet Ahijah had said that Jeroboam would be rooted out. He seems to have lasted 22 years with his son succeeding him.