Primitive Christian Communities

The early followers of Jesus were his Jewish apostles and disciples.  They formed a close-knit community.  As they ventured out of Jerusalem after the death and resurrection of Jesus, they formed other small groups of Christian communities.  During the first century of Christianity, we often refer to these Christians as the Primitive Christian Communities, not really a church yet, but described in the Acts of the Apostles.  As far as we know, these Jewish followers of Jesus prayed in the Temple and the synagogues.  They shared their stories about Jesus and his followers with other Jewish groups.  Out of this oral community will come the written documents of the New Testament.

 

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Criteria for the sacred Christian books

The first collection of these Christian books (biblia) was the Pauline letters and the Acts of the Apostles around the year 100 CE.  The collection of the four canonical gospels of Matthew, Mark, Luke, and John was present by the year 200 CE.  By 367 CE, Christians had arrived at a consensus about the twenty-seven books of the New Testament that we have today.  The criteria for the sacred books of the biblical New Testament were a connection with the apostles and one of the major Christian communities, while being orthodox in its views.