Abraham (Lk 3:34-3:34)

This is where the genealogy of Matthew ends with Abraham.  Luke continued further back.  He said that Judah was the son of Jacob (τοῦ Ἰακὼβ), who had 12 sons with 4 different women, that become the 12 tribes of Israel.  Jacob was the son of Isaac (τοῦ Ἰσαὰκ), the son of Abraham (τοῦ Ἀβραὰμ), who was the son of Terah (τοῦ Θάρα), the son of Nahor (τοῦ Ναχὼρ).  Throughout the Torah, there was a continual reference to the God of Abraham, Isaac, and Jacob.  These 3 generations were key to Hebrew and Jewish history.  Their stories can be found in the book of Genesis, chapters 12-35.  Remember that Abraham had a son with his wife’s maid, Hagar, who was called Ishmael.  However, both were sent away.  Jacob had a twin brother named Esau, whom he tricked out of his father’s inheritance.  Terah and Nahor can be found in 1 Chronicles, chapter 1:26, and Genesis, chapter 11:24-32.  Nahor was the name of Abram’s grandfather and his brother.  Abram, appeared to be the oldest, took a wife named Sarai, who was barren.  Later it will be revealed that Sarai is his half-sister, since Terah had a concubine.  They all lived at Ur in the Chaldeans, probably in northwest Mesopotamia.  Terah took his son Abram and his wife, Sarai, and his grandson Lot, and left Ur and went to Canaan.  However, they settled in a place that had the same name as his dead son, Haran.  This may have been part of a huge migration in the early second millennium, about 2000 years before the common Christian era.

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From Shem to Abraham (1 Chr 1:24-1:27)

“Shem, Arpachshad, Shelah; Eber, Peleg, Reu; Serug, Nahor, Terah; Abram, that is, Abraham.”

This section is based on Genesis, chapter 11, which has more details about these people. Here the names are listed without indicating how they are connected. This was also a partial duplication of the preceding verses. Now we only interested in Shem as the other two sons of Noah fade away. According to Genesis, (1) Shem’s 3rd son, (2) Arpachshad, had a son, (3) Shelah, who in turn had a son, Eber. (4) Eber also had a son, (5) Peleg. There is no mention of his brother Joktan and his 13 Arab sons here. Now Peleg seems more important, the reverse of the preceding section. This genealogy went into new territory as it follows the lineage of Peleg, not Joktan. Peleg had a son, (6) Reu, who shows up in the genealogies about Abraham. Reu also had a son, (7) Serug, who in turn had a son, named (8) Nahor. Nahor is the name of Abram’s grandfather and his brother. The older Nahor had a son, (9) Terah, who had 3 named sons, (10) Abram, Nahor, and Haran, so that Nahor was the name of the father of Terah and his son also. Now we get to the family background of Abram. Abram, who appears to be the oldest, took a wife named Sarai, who was barren. Sarai was his half sister, since Terah also had a concubine. Haran had three children, Lot, Milcah, and Iscah. However, he died early before his father Terah had died. They all lived at Ur in the Chaldeans, probably in northwest Mesopotamia. The younger brother of Abram, Nahor, took a wife named Milcah, who was the daughter of his brother Haran, who had died, the sister of Lot and Iscah. Thus Haran married his niece. Haran is a name that will appear again. More importantly, Terah became the father of Abram. So we have about 10 generations from Noah to Abram, about 400 years if you go by the first born. There is never any mention of daughters.

The descendants of Terah (Gen 11:27-11:32)

“Now these are the descendants of Terah. Terah was the father of Abram, Nahor, and Haran.  Haran was the father of Lot.  Haran died before his father Terah in the land of his birth, in Ur of the Chaldeans.   Abram and Nahor took wives. The name of Abram’s wife was Sarai, and the name of Nahor’s wife was Milcah.  She was the daughter of Haran the father of Milcah and Iscah.  Now Sarai was barren.  She had no children.”

Now we get the family background of Abram. Abram who appears to be the oldest took a wife named Sarai, who was barren. Later it will be revealed that Sarai is his half sister, since Terah had a concubine.  Haran had three children, Lot, Milcah, and Iscah.  However, he died early before his father Terah had died.  They all lived at Ur in the Chaldeans, probably in northwest Mesopotamia.  Nahor took a wife named Milcah, who was the daughter of his brother Haran, who had died, the sister of Lot and Iscah.  Thus Haran married his niece.  Haran is a name that will appear again..

“Terah took his son Abram and his grandson Lot son of Haran, and his daughter-in-law Sarai, his son Abram’s wife, and they went out together from Ur of the Chaldeans to go into the land of Canaan.  But when they came to Haran, they settled there.  The days of Terah were two hundred five years.  Terah died in Haran.”

Terah took his son Abram and his wife, Sarai, and his grandson Lot, and left Ur and went to Canaan. However, they settled in a place that had the same name as his dead son, Haran.  This is where Terah died at the age of 205.  Nahor apparently stayed in Ur with his family, Lot’s sister Milcah. This may have been part of a huge migration in the early second millennium before the common Christian era.

The patriarchs after the flood (Gen 11:10-11:26)

 “These are the descendants of Shem. When Shem was one hundred years old, he became the father of Arpachshad two years after the flood.  Shem lived after the birth of Arpachshad five hundred years, and had other sons and daughters.”

Now we only interested in Shem as the other two sons of Noah fade away.  At age of 100, 2 years after the flood, Shem has a son, Arpachshad, who was his third son, not the first born.  Like the other genealogies he has other sons and daughters and died at the age of 600 years old.

 “When Arpachshad had lived thirty-five years, he became the father of Shelah.  Arpachshad lived after the birth of Shelah four hundred three years, and had other sons and daughters.”

Arpachshad at age 35 had a son, Shelah, but he also had other sons and daughters and died at the age of 438 years old.

“When Shelah had lived thirty years, he became the father of Eber.  Shelah lived after the birth of Eber four hundred three years, and had other sons and daughters.”

Shelah at age 30 had a son, Eber, plus other sons and daughters and died at the age of 433 years old.

 “When Eber had lived thirty-four years, he became the father of Peleg.  Eber lived after the birth of Peleg four hundred thirty years, and had other sons and daughters.”

Eber at age 34 had a son, Peleg, plus other sons and daughters.  There is no mention of Joktan and his thirteen Arab sons.  Now Peleg seems more important, the reverse of the preceding chapter.  Eber died at the age of 437 years old.

 “When Peleg had lived thirty years, he became the father of Reu. Peleg lived after the birth of Reu two hundred nine years, and had other sons and daughters.”

Now the genealogy is into new territory. Peleg at age 30 had a son, Reu, plus other sons and daughters.  Reu shows up in genealogies about Abraham.  Peleg died at the age of 239 years old.  Notice their lives are getting shorter.

“When Reu had lived thirty-two years, he became the father of Serug. Reu lived after the birth of Serug two hundred seven years, and had other sons and daughters.”

 Reu at age 30 had a son, Serug, plus other sons and daughters.  He died at the age of 237 years old.

“When Serug had lived thirty years, he became the father of Nahor.  Serug lived after the birth of Nahor two hundred years, and had other sons and daughters.”

Serug at age 30 had a son, Nahor, plus other sons and daughters and died at the age of 230 years old.

“When Nahor had lived twenty-nine years, he became the father of Terah.  Nahor lived after the birth of Terah a hundred nineteen years, and had other sons and daughters.”

Nahor is the name of Abram’s grandfather and his brother.  At age 29  he had a son, Terah, plus other sons and daughters and died at the age of  138 years old.

 “When Terah had lived seventy years, he became the father of Abram, Nahor, and Haran.”

Terah at age 70 had 3 sons, Abram, Nahor, and Haran.  Nahor was the name of the father of Terah and his son also.  More importantly, he was the father of Abram.  So we have about 10 generations from Noah to Abram, about 400 years if you go by the first born.

Outline of the Book of Genesis

Genesis General Structure (per Jerusalem Bible)   

I.    The origins of the world

a.    The creation and the fall

The first story of creation (Gen 1:1-2:4)

The second story of creation: paradise (Gen 2:4b-2:25)

The fall (Gen 3:1-3:24)

Cain and Abel (Gen 4:1-4:16)

The descendants of Cain (Gen 4:17-4:24)

Seth and his descendants (Gen 4:25-26)

The patriarchs before the flood (Gen 5:1-5:32)

 Sons of God and daughters of men (Gen 6:1- 6:4)

b.  The flood

The corruption of humanity before the flood (Gen 6:5-6:12)

Preparations for the flood (Gen 6:13-7:9)

The flood (Gen 7:10-7:24)

The decrease of the water (Gen 8:1-8:14)

The exit from the ark (Gen 8:15-8:22)

The new world order (Gen 9:1-9:17)

c.  From the flood to Abraham

Noah and his sons (Gen 9:18-9:29)

How the earth was peopled (Gen 10:1-10:32)

The tower of Babel (Gen 11:1-11:9)

The patriarchs after the flood (Gen 11:10-11:26)

The descendants of Terah (Gen 11:27-11:32)

II.      The story of Abraham

The call of Abraham (Gen 12:1-12:9)

Abraham goes to Egypt (Gen 12:10-12:20)

The separation of Abraham and Lot (Gen 13:1-13:18)

The battle of the four great kings (Gen 14:1-14:16)

Melchizedek (Gen 14:17-14:24)

The promise of a divine alliance (Gen 15:1-15:21)

The birth of Ishmael (Gen 16:1-16:16)

The covenant and circumcision (Gen 17:1–17:27)

The apparition at Mamre (Gen 18:1-18:15)

The intercession of Abraham (Gen 18:16-18:33)

The destruction of Sodom (Gen 19:1-19:29)

The origins of the Ammonites and Moabites (Gen 19:30-19:38)

Abraham at Gerar (Gen 20:1-20:20:18)

The birth of Isaac (Gen 21:1-21:7)

The dismissal of Hagar and Ishmael (Gen 21:8-21:21)

Abraham and Abimelech at Beer-sheba (Gen 21:22-21:34)

The sacrifice of Isaac (Gen 22:1-22:19)

The descendants of Nahor (Gen 22:20-22:24)

The tomb of the patriarchs (Gen 23:1-23:20)

Marriage of Isaac (Gen 24:1-24:67)

The descendants of Keturah (Gen 25:1-25:6)

The death of Abraham (Gen 25:7-25:11)

The descendants of Ishmael (Gen 25:12-25:18)

III.      The story of Isaac and Jacob

The birth of Esau and Jacob (Gen 25:19-25:28)

Esau gives up his birthright (Gen 25:29-25:34)

Isaac goes to Gerar (Gen 26:1-26:14)

The wells at Gerar and Beer-sheba (Gen 26:15-26:25)

The alliance with Abimelech (Gen 26:26-26:30)

The Hittite wives of Esau (Gen 26:34-26:35)

Jacob cheats Esau out of the blessing of Isaac (Gen 27:1-27:45)

Isaac sends Jacob to Laban (Gen 27:46-28:5)

Esau’s other marriage (Gen 28:6-28:9)

Jacob’s dream (Gen 28:10-28:22)

Jacob arrives at Haran (Gen 29:1-29:14)

The two marriages of Jacob (Gen 29:15-Gen 29:30)

The children of Jacob (Gen 29:31-30:24)

How Jacob got rich (Gen 30:25-30:43)

The flight of Jacob (Gen 31:1-31:21)

Laban pursues Jacob (Gen 31:22-Gen 31:42)

The treaty between Jacob and Laban (Gen 31:43-32:2)

Jacob prepares to meet Esau (Gen 32:3-32:21)

The struggle with God (Gen 32:22-32:32)

The meeting with Esau (Gen 33:1-33:11)

Jacob separates from Esau (Gen 33:12-33:17)

Jacob arrives at Shechem (Gen 33:18-33:20)

The violence against Dinah (Gen34:1-34:5)

The marriage pact with Hamor and Shechem (Gen 34:6-34:24)

The vengeance of Simeon and Levi (Gen 34:25-34:31)

Jacob at Bethel (Gen 35:1-35:15)

The birth of Benjamin and the death of Rachel (Gen 35:16-35:21)

The incest of Rueben (Gen 35:22-Gen 35:22)

The twelve sons of Jacob (Gen 35:23-35:26)

The death of Isaac (Gen 35:27-35:29)

IV.     The story of Joseph

Joseph and his brothers (Gen 37:1-Gen 37:11)

Joseph is sold by his brothers (Gen 37:12-37:36)

The story of Judah and Tamar (Gen 38:1-38:30)

Joseph in Egypt (Gen 39:1-39:6)

Joseph and the seducer (Gen 39:7-Gen 39:20)

Joseph in prison (Gen 39:21-Gen39:23)

Joseph interprets the dreams of Pharaoh’s household (Gen 40:1-40:23)

Pharaoh’s dreams (Gen 41:1-41:36)

The elevation of Joseph (Gen 41:37-41:49)

The sons of Joseph (Gen 41:50-41:57)

The first meeting of Joseph and his brothers (Gen 42:1-42:24)

The return of the sons of Jacob to Canaan (Gen 42:25-42:38)

The sons of Jacob return with Benjamin (Gen 43:1-43:14)

The meeting with Joseph (Gen 43:15-43:34)

The cup of Joseph in Benjamin’s sack (Gen 44:1-44:17)

The intervention of Judah (Gen 44:18-44:34)

Joseph reveals himself (Gen 45:1-45:15)

Pharaoh’s invitation (Gen 45:16-45:20)

The return to Canaan (Gen 45:21-45:28)

The departure of Jacob for Egypt (Gen 46:1-46:7)

The family of Jacob (Gen 46:8-46:27)

The welcome of Joseph (Gen 46:28-46:34)

The audience with Pharaoh (Gen 47:1-47:6)

The establishment in Egypt (Gen 47:7-47:12)

The agricultural politics of Joseph (Gen 47:13-47:26)

The last wishes of Jacob (Gen 47:27-47:31)

Jacob adopts and blesses the two sons of Joseph (Gen 48:1-48:22)

The blessings of Jacob (Gen 49:1-49:28)

The last moments and death of Jacob (Gen 49:29-49:33)

The funeral of Jacob (Gen 50:1-50:14)

The death of Joseph (Gen 50:15-50:26)

 

My understanding of Genesis