Forgotten Tyre for seventy years (Isa 23:15-23:18)

“From that day,

Tyre will be forgotten

For seventy years,

The lifetime of one king.

At the end of seventy years,

It will happen to Tyre

As in the song

About the prostitute.

‘Take a harp!

Go about the city!

You forgotten prostitute!

Make sweet melody!

Sing many songs!

That you may be remembered!’

At the end of seventy years,

Yahweh will visit Tyre.

She will return to her trade.

She will prostitute herself

With all the kingdoms of the world

On the face of the earth.

Her merchandise,

Her wages will be dedicated

To Yahweh.

Her profits will not be stored.

They will not be hoarded.

Her merchandise will supply

Abundant food.

They will supply fine clothing

For those who live

In the presence of Yahweh.”

Isaiah proclaims that Tyre will be forgotten from that day of destruction for 70 years, instead of a total desolation, as in the previous verses. Tyre would disappear, but only for the lifetime of a king. At the end of 70 years, Tyre would be like an old prostitute that sings in the streets. Like a forgotten person, she would sing melodic songs so that she would be remembered. Then Yahweh would visit Tyre, so that it would be consecrated to Yahweh. Tyre would continue her prostituting trade ways with all the countries in the world. However, her merchandise and wages would be dedicated to Yahweh. Tyre would not store or hoard her profits, but her merchandise would provide food and clothing for those who lived in the presence of Yahweh, the Lord.

Give thanks to Yahweh (Ps 138:1-138:3)

A Psalm of David

“Yahweh!

I give you thanks

With my whole heart.

Before the gods,

I sing your praise.

I bow down toward your holy temple.

I give thanks to your name.

Because of your steadfast love.

I give thanks to your name.

Because of your faithfulness.

You have exalted your name

Above everything.

You have exalted your word

Above everything.

On the day I called,

You did answer me.

You increased my strength of soul.”

Psalm 138 is a thanksgiving psalm of David as indicated in the title. David gives thanks to Yahweh from his whole heart. He sings his praises in his holy Temple. Yahweh is greater than any of the other gods or angels. He gave thanks to his holy name for his steadfast love and faithfulness. His name and word were to be exalted above everything. On the day that David called, Yahweh answered him. There was no delay here. Thus this strengthened his soul.

Sing to Yahweh (Ps 101:1-101:2)

A psalm of David

“I will sing of loyalty to you.

I will sing of justice to you.

Yahweh!

I will sing.

I will study the way that is blameless.

When shall I attain it?”

Psalm 101 is a psalm of David. David sings of loyalty and justice to Yahweh. He wants to be blameless, but he knows that he has not attained it yet. Perhaps this was a psalm for a king to recite before his coronation.

Song of praise for the Temple (Ps 84:1-84:2)

To the choirmaster leader, according to the Gittith, a psalm of the Sons of Korah

“How lovely is your dwelling place!

Yahweh of hosts!

My soul longs,

Indeed it faints

For the courts of Yahweh.

My heart sings for joy!

My flesh sings for joy!

I sing to the living God!”

Psalm 84 is a choral song of praise for the Temple on Mount Zion. This psalm is part of the series of Korah psalms, the Temple singers, using Gittith, a stringed instrument. This psalmist loves the house of Yahweh as his soul longs for and faints for the courtyards of Yahweh. His heart and flesh sings for joy to the living God.

Final praise of Yahweh (Ps 18:49-18:50)

“For this I will extol you!

Yahweh!

Among the nations,

I will sing praises to your name.

Great triumphs he gives to his king.

He shows steadfast love to his anointed.

To David

And his descendants forever.”

Once again like 2 Samuel, chapter 22, David sings Yahweh’s praises among the nations at the end of this psalm. Yahweh was the tower of salvation to his anointed King David. May his descendents be loved forever. So ends this hymn of praise from a conquering king in thanksgiving for his various victories. The enemies are all gone. The Davidic dynasty begins. Notice that the last few phrases speak explicitly of David in the third person, rather than the first person of the previous verses.