You did not anoint my head (Lk 7:46-7:46)

“You did not anoint

My head

With oil.

But she has anointed

My feet

With ointment.”

 

ἐλαίῳ τὴν κεφαλήν μου οὐκ ἤλειψας· αὕτη δὲ μύρῳ ἤλειψεν τοὺς πόδας μου.

 

Luke continued with his unique narrative.  Jesus said to Simon the Pharisee that he had not anointed his head with oil (ἐλαίῳ τὴν κεφαλήν μου οὐκ ἤλειψας), but this woman had anointed his feet with oil or Myron (αὕτη δὲ μύρῳ ἤλειψεν τοὺς πόδας μου).  In both Mark, chapter 14:8, and Matthew, chapter 26:12, Jesus said that the anointing of his head had prepared him for his burial, but there is nothing like that here.  Have you ever anointed anyone’s head or feet?

One was forgiven more (Lk 7:43-7:43)

“Simon answered.

‘I suppose

The one

For whom

He cancelled

The greater debt.’

Jesus said to him.

‘You have judged rightly.’”

 

ἀποκριθεὶς Σίμων εἶπεν Ὑπολαμβάνω ὅτι ᾧ τὸ πλεῖον ἐχαρίσατο. ὁ δὲ εἶπεν αὐτῷ Ὀρθῶς ἔκρινας.

 

Luke uniquely continued this conversation between Simon the Pharisee and Jesus.  Simon answered saying (ἀποκριθεὶς Σίμων εἶπεν) that the one for whom he had cancelled the greater debt (Ὑπολαμβάνω ὅτι ᾧ τὸ πλεῖον ἐχαρίσατο) would love more.  Jesus then said to him that he had have judged correctly (ὁ δὲ εἶπεν αὐτῷ Ὀρθῶς ἔκρινας).  A simple question demanded a simple response.  You love the people who forgive you more.  Who has forgiven you the most?

Jesus has something to say (Lk 7:40-7:40)

“Jesus spoke up.

He said to him.

‘Simon!

I have something

To say to you.’

He replied.

‘Teacher!

Speak!’”

 

καὶ ἀποκριθεὶς ὁ Ἰησοῦς εἶπεν πρὸς αὐτόν Σίμων, ἔχω σοί τι εἰπεῖν. ὁ δέ Διδάσκαλε, εἰπέ, φησίν.

 

Luke uniquely said that Jesus responded (καὶ ἀποκριθεὶς ὁ Ἰησοῦς) to this Pharisee.  He called him Simon (εἶπεν πρὸς αὐτόν Σίμων).  He said he had something to say to him (ἔχω σοί τι εἰπεῖν).  This Simon responded respectfully, calling him teacher (ὁ δέ Διδάσκαλε), and asking him to speak (εἰπέ, φησίν).  Who is this Simon the Pharisee?  He was not mentioned in the other canonical gospels. There are similarities between this Simon the Pharisee and the Simon the leper mentioned in Matthew, chapter 26:6, and Mark, chapter 14:3, but those occasions were later in Bethany.  The identity of that Simon the leper is also unknown.  However, it could have been someone whom Jesus had cured from leprosy, who became his disciple.   Nevertheless, this was a very respectful conversation here between Simon and Jesus.  Are you respectful in your conversations?