We did our duty (Lk 17:10-17:10)

“Thus,

You also,

When you have done

All that you were

Ordered to do,

Say.

‘We are worthless slaves.

We have done only

What we ought

To have done.”

 

οὕτως καὶ ὑμεῖς, ὅταν ποιήσητε πάντα τὰ διαταχθέντα ὑμῖν, λέγετε ὅτι Δοῦλοι ἀχρεῖοί ἐσμεν, ὃ ὠφείλομεν ποιῆσαι πεποιήκαμεν.

 

Luke uniquely indicated that Jesus said that then they had done what they were ordered to do (οὕτως καὶ ὑμεῖς, ὅταν ποιήσητε πάντα τὰ διαταχθέντα ὑμῖν), they should respond by saying (λέγετε) that they were only worthless slaves (ὅτι Δοῦλοι ἀχρεῖοί ἐσμεν) that did only what they ought to have done (ὃ ὠφείλομεν ποιῆσαι πεποιήκαμεν).  In other words, do not take any credit for doing what you normally should have been doing anyway.  We are like slaves to Jesus, doing just what he asked us to do, our Christian duty.  Should you be praised for doing what Jesus wanted you to do?

What can you do on the Sabbath? (Lk 6:9-6:9)

“Then Jesus

Said to them.

‘I ask you!

Is it lawful

To do good

Or to do evil

On the Sabbath?

Is it lawful

To save life

Or to destroy life

On the Sabbath?’”

 

εἶπεν δὲ ὁ Ἰησοῦς πρὸς αὐτούς Ἐπερωτῶ ὑμᾶς εἰ ἔξεστιν τῷ σαββάτῳ ἀγαθοποιῆσαι ἢ κακοποιῆσαι, ψυχὴν σῶσαι ἢ ἀπολέσαι;

 

Luke indicated that Jesus asked them (εἶπεν δὲ ὁ Ἰησοῦς πρὸς αὐτούς Ἐπερωτῶ ὑμᾶς), using the second person plural, if it was lawful (εἰ ἔξεστιν) to do good (ἀγαθοποιῆσαι) or sin, do harm, or evil (ἢ κακοποιῆσαι) on the Sabbath (τῷ σαββάτῳ)?  Was it lawful to save a life (ψυχὴν σῶσαι) or destroy a life (ἢ ἀπολέσαι) on the Sabbath?  This was based on Mark chapter 3:4, where Jesus asked the same questions.  Mark added that they were silent and did not respond, but Luke did not say that.  Jesus wanted to know what were the exceptions to the Sabbath restrictions.  Meanwhile, Matthew, chapter 12:11-12, had Jesus speak about saving sheep on the Sabbath.

Soldiers (Lk 3:14-3:14)

“Soldiers

Also asked him.

‘What shall we do?’

John said to them.

‘Do not intimidate

People!

Do not falsely

Accuse people!

Be content

With your wages!’”

 

ἐπηρώτων δὲ αὐτὸν καὶ στρατευόμενοι λέγοντες Τί ποιήσωμεν καὶ ἡμεῖς; καὶ εἶπεν αὐτοῖς Μηδένα διασείσητε μηδὲ συκοφαντήσητε, καὶ ἀρκεῖσθε τοῖς ὀψωνίοις ὑμῶν.

 

This final unique saying of Luke about John and his preaching was a dialogue with some soldiers, that is not found elsewhere in the biblical writings.  Luke said that some soldiers also asked John (ἐπηρώτων δὲ αὐτὸν καὶ στρατευόμενοι λέγοντες) what they should do (Τί ποιήσωμεν καὶ ἡμεῖς).  John told them (καὶ εἶπεν αὐτοῖς) not to intimidate people or use false accusations (Μηδένα διασείσητε μηδὲ συκοφαντήσητε).  They should be content with their wages (καὶ ἀρκεῖσθε τοῖς ὀψωνίοις ὑμῶν).  Once again Luke has John respond with a call for justice, fairness, and honesty.  These Jewish soldiers of Herod Antipas were perhaps a little cruel or crude in their everyday life activities.

Make proper collections (Lk 3:13-3:13)

“John said to them.

‘Collect no more

Than the amount

Prescribed for you!’”

 

ὁ δὲ εἶπεν πρὸς αὐτούς Μηδὲν πλέον παρὰ τὸ διατεταγμένον ὑμῖν πράσσετε.

 

Luke had John respond to these tax collectors with another unique saying.  Only Luke said that John told the tax collectors (ὁ δὲ εἶπεν πρὸς αὐτούς) that they were to collect no more than the amount prescribed for them (Μηδὲν πλέον παρὰ τὸ διατεταγμένον ὑμῖν πράσσετε).  John simply wanted them to do their job.  Apparently, many of these tax collectors would overcharge people and keep the difference.  Everyone was aware of this somewhat common corrupt practice.  John seemed to call for honesty and justice among these Jewish Roman tax collectors.

My Father’s house (Lk 2:49-2:49)

“Jesus said to them.

‘Why are you searching

For me?

Did you not know

That I must be

In my Father’s house?’”

 

καὶ εἶπεν πρὸς αὐτούς Τί ὅτι ἐζητεῖτέ με; οὐκ ᾔδειτε ὅτι ἐν τοῖς τοῦ Πατρός μου δεῖ εἶναί με;

 

Luke had Jesus respond in a sharp fashion.  Jesus said to them (καὶ εἶπεν πρὸς αὐτούς) why were they searching for him (Τί ὅτι ἐζητεῖτέ με).  Did they not know (οὐκ ᾔδειτε) that he had to be or that it was his duty to be in his Father’s house (ὅτι ἐν τοῖς τοῦ Πατρός μου δεῖ εἶναί με)?  This sounds like a rebuke to his parents.  However, Jesus seemed to indicate that he had a higher mission.  The main question is why did he wait nearly 20 years after this before he began his special Fatherly mission?

Jesus did not answer (Mk 15:5-15:5)

“But Jesus

Made no further reply.

Thus,

Pilate was amazed.”

 

ὁ δὲ Ἰησοῦς οὐκέτι οὐδὲν ἀπεκρίθη, ὥστε θαυμάζειν τὸν Πειλᾶτον.

 

This is similar to Matthew, chapter 27:14.  In Luke, chapter 23:9, this dialogue took place before Governor Herod Antipas in Galilee, instead of here before Governor Pontius Pilate in Judea.  Mark said that Jesus made no further reply (ὁ δὲ Ἰησοῦς οὐκέτι οὐδὲν ἀπεκρίθη).  He did not answer to a single charge.  Thus, Pilate was greatly amazed at Jesus (ὥστε θαυμάζειν τὸν Πειλᾶτον).  Do you respond to every criticism?

They seized Jesus (Mk 14:46-14:46)

“Then they laid hands

On Jesus.

They seized him.”

 

οἱ δὲ ἐπέβαλαν τὰς χεῖρας αὐτῷ καὶ ἐκράτησαν αὐτόν.

 

This is similar to Matthew, chapter 26:50, but here in Mark, there was no conversation like in Matthew and the other gospel writers.  In Luke, chapter 22:48-53, Jesus reprimanded Judas for betraying him, before he was seized.  In John, chapter 18:4-11, there was a long dialogue of Jesus with those who came to get him, before he was arrested.  Mark said that Jesus did not respond to Judas at all.  They just put their hands upon him or grabbed Jesus (οἱ δὲ ἐπέβαλαν τὰς χεῖρας αὐτῷ).  Then they seized or arrested Jesus without any kind of conversation at all (καὶ ἐκράτησαν αὐτόν).