Jesus cures her (Lk 4:39-4:39)

“Then Jesus

Stood over her.

He rebuked

The fever.

It left her.

Immediately,

She got up.

She began

To serve them.”

 

καὶ ἐπιστὰς ἐπάνω αὐτῆς ἐπετίμησεν τῷ πυρετῷ, καὶ ἀφῆκεν αὐτήν· παραχρῆμα δὲ ἀναστᾶσα διηκόνει αὐτοῖς.

 

Luke said that Jesus stood over her (καὶ ἐπιστὰς ἐπάνω αὐτῆς).  He rebuked the fever (ἐπετίμησεν τῷ πυρετῷ), so that it left her (καὶ ἀφῆκεν αὐτήν).  Immediately or instantly (παραχρῆμα), she got up (δὲ ἀναστᾶσα) and began to serve them (διηκόνει αὐτοῖς).  Matthew, chapter 8:15, and Mark, chapter 1:31, have something similar, almost word for word stories.  Luke was more dramatic here by having Jesus stand over her and rebuke the evil spirit, but Jesus did not touch her.  Mark and Matthew said that Jesus came and touched her by the hand and lifted her up.  Then the fever left her.  She, then began to serve them with her normal hospitality.  This was a typical healing that took place with a touching hand.  The mother-in law of Simon, who was staying at his house, was cured so well that she was able to resume her normal hospitality activities.

John and Herod (Lk 3:19-3:20)

“John had rebuked

Herod,

The tetrarch ruler,

Because of Herodias,

His brother’s wife.

John also rebuked

Herod

For all the other evil things

That he had done.

Herod added

To all these evil things,

When he locked up

John in prison.”

 

ὁ δὲ Ἡρῴδης ὁ τετραάρχης, ἐλεγχόμενος ὑπ’ αὐτοῦ περὶ Ἡρῳδιάδος τῆς γυναικὸς τοῦ ἀδελφοῦ αὐτοῦ καὶ περὶ πάντων ὧν ἐποίησεν πονηρῶν ὁ Ἡρῴδης,

προσέθηκεν καὶ τοῦτο ἐπὶ πᾶσιν, κατέκλεισεν τὸν Ἰωάνην ἐν φυλακῇ

 

Both Mark, chapter 6:14-17, and Matthew, chapter 14:1-5, have the imprisonment of John much later in their works, while Luke has it right here at the beginning of his gospel story.  Luke said that John had rebuked Herod Antipas, the tetrarch (ὁ δὲ Ἡρῴδης ὁ τετραάρχης, ἐλεγχόμενος ὑπ’ αὐτοῦ) of Galilee because of Herodias (περὶ Ἡρῳδιάδος), his brother’s wife (τῆς γυναικὸς τοῦ ἀδελφοῦ αὐτοῦ) and all the other evil things that Herod had done (καὶ περὶ πάντων ὧν ἐποίησεν πονηρῶν ὁ Ἡρῴδης,).  Herod added to all these evil things (προσέθηκεν καὶ τοῦτο ἐπὶ πᾶσιν), when he locked up John in prison (κατέκλεισεν τὸν Ἰωάνην ἐν φυλακῇ).  The Roman educated Herod, was the ruler or tetrarch of Galilee and Perea from 4 BCE-39 CE, as a client region, in the Roman Empire.  This Herod Antipas was the son of Herod the Great.  He had built the capital city of Galilee Tiberias, since he was a favorite of the Roman Emperor Tiberius (14-37 CE).  Herod, the Roman ruler in Galilee seized John the Baptist and put him in jail.  John had been complaining that Herod Antipas had married the wife of his half-brother Philip, after he had divorced his first wife.  His first wife went back to her father and started a war with Herod Antipas.  Herod’s new wife was called Herodias.  John had called him out for this marriage with Herodias, his brother’s recently divorced wife.  John had told Herod that it was not lawful for him to have her as his wife.  Thus, Herod had John arrested and sent to prison.

Jesus appears to the eleven apostles (Mk 16:14-16:14)

“Later,

Jesus appeared

To the eleven themselves,

As they were sitting

At the table.

Jesus upbraided them

For their lack of faith

And stubbornness,

Because they had not believed

Those who saw him

After he had risen.”

 

Ὕστερον δὲ ἀνακειμένοις αὐτοῖς τοῖς ἕνδεκα ἐφανερώθη, καὶ ὠνείδισεν τὴν ἀπιστίαν αὐτῶν καὶ σκληροκαρδίαν ὅτι τοῖς θεασαμένοις αὐτὸν ἐγηγερμένον οὐκ ἐπίστευσαν.

 

The risen Jesus appearing to the eleven apostles can be found in Matthew, chapter 28:16, but in Galilee, and in Luke, chapter 24:36, in Jerusalem.  John, chapter 20:19 and 26 had 2 appearances of Jesus in Jerusalem, and one in Galilee, chapter 21:1.  Here in this addition to Mark, Jesus appeared to them, probably in Jerusalem.  The apostles were sitting or reclining at the table (Ὕστερον δὲ ἀνακειμένοις αὐτοῖς).  Then Jesus appeared to the 11 (τοῖς ἕνδεκα ἐφανερώθη).  He upbraided or rebuked them (καὶ ὠνείδισεν) for their lack of faith or disbelief (τὴν ἀπιστίαν αὐτῶν) and their stubbornness or hardness of heart (καὶ σκληροκαρδίαν).  They had not believed (οὐκ ἐπίστευσαν) those who had seen him after his resurrection (ὅτι τοῖς θεασαμένοις αὐτὸν ἐγηγερμένον).  Once again, there were doubters among these 11 apostles about the resurrection of Jesus.  Jesus was not happy about this.

Be quiet (Mk 10:48-10:48)

“Many sternly ordered him

To be quiet.

But he cried out

Even more loudly.

‘Son of David!

Have mercy on me!’”

 

καὶ ἐπετίμων αὐτῷ πολλοὶ ἵνα σιωπήσῃ· ὁ δὲ πολλῷ μᾶλλον ἔκραζεν Υἱὲ Δαυείδ, ἐλέησόν με.

 

Both Matthew, chapter 20:31, and Luke, chapter 18:39, have something similar.  Mark said that many in the crowd rebuked, admonished, or ordered him to be quiet or silent (καὶ ἐπετίμων αὐτῷ πολλοὶ ἵνα σιωπήσῃ).  But he shouted out even more loudly (ὁ δὲ πολλῷ μᾶλλον ἔκραζεν).  He repeated again what he had shouted out earlier.  He called Jesus, the Son of David (Υἱὲ Δαυείδ).  He wanted Jesus to have mercy on them (ἐλέησόν με).  This would become a Christian cry for mercy.

Jesus commands the unclean spirit (Mk 9:25-9:25)

“When Jesus saw

That a crowd

Came running together,

He rebuked

The unclean spirit.

He said to it.

‘You spirit

That keeps this boy

From speaking

And hearing!

I command you!

Come out of him!

Never enter him again!’”

 

ἰδὼν δὲ ὁ Ἰησοῦς ὅτι ἐπισυντρέχει ὄχλος, ἐπετίμησεν τῷ πνεύματι τῷ ἀκαθάρτῳ λέγων αὐτῷ Τὸ ἄλαλον καὶ κωφὸν πνεῦμα, ἐγὼ ἐπιτάσσω σοι, ἔξελθε ἐξ αὐτοῦ καὶ μηκέτι εἰσέλθῃς εἰς αὐτόν.

 

This is unique to Mark.  When Jesus saw that a crowd came running together (ἰδὼν δὲ ὁ Ἰησοῦς ὅτι ἐπισυντρέχει ὄχλος), he rebuked the unclean spirit (ἐπετίμησεν τῷ πνεύματι τῷ ἀκαθάρτῳ).  He spoke directly to this evil spirit (λέγων αὐτῷ) as he commanded, in the first person singular, this unclean spirit (ἐγὼ ἐπιτάσσω σοι), in the second person “you”.  This evil spirit had kept this boy from speaking and hearing.  This mute and deaf spirit (Τὸ ἄλαλον καὶ κωφὸν πνεῦμα,), was to come out of him (ἔξελθε ἐξ αὐτοῦ), never again to enter him (καὶ μηκέτι εἰσέλθῃς εἰς αὐτόν).  Jesus then got rid of the unclean spirit that was in this boy in a public act in front of a crowd.

Jesus stops the storm (Mk 4:39-4:39)

“Jesus

Woke up.

He rebuked the wind.

He said to the sea.

‘Peace!

Be still!’

Then the wind ceased.

There was a dead calm.”

 

καὶ διεγερθεὶς ἐπετίμησεν τῷ ἀνέμῳ καὶ εἶπεν τῇ θαλάσσῃ Σιώπα, πεφίμωσο. καὶ ἐκόπασεν ὁ ἄνεμος, καὶ ἐγένετο γαλήνη μεγάλη.

 

This response of Jesus can be found in Matthew, chapter 8:26, and Luke, chapter 8:24, in a somewhat similar manner.  Mark said that after Jesus woke up (καὶ διεγερθεὶς), he then rebuked or admonished (ἐπετίμησεν) the wind (τῷ ἀνέμῳ).  Then he spoke to the sea itself (καὶ τῇ θαλάσσῃ), as he told the sea to be silent, peaceful, and still (Σιώπα, πεφίμωσο).  Thus, the wind abated or was still (αὶ ἐκόπασεν ὁ ἄνεμος) and there was a great calmness in the sea (καὶ ἐγένετο γαλήνη μεγάλη).

The Messianic secret (Mk 3:12-3:12)

“Jesus sternly ordered them

Not to make him known.”

 

καὶ πολλὰ ἐπετίμα αὐτοῖς ἵνα μὴ αὐτὸν φανερὸν ποιήσωσιν.

 

Mark said that Jesus strictly or sternly ordered, rebuked, chided, warned or admonished these unclean spirits (καὶ πολλὰ ἐπετίμα αὐτοῖς) that they should not make it known that he was the Son of God (ἵνα μὴ αὐτὸν φανερὸν ποιήσωσιν).  This warning about the messianic secret can be found in all 3 synoptic gospels.  Jesus, in some ironic way, did not want the people to know that he was the Messiah, the Christ, or the Son of God.  Thus, the name “Jesus Christ” did not take hold until after his death and resurrection.  Only these unclean spirits and a few elite followers of Jesus knew that he was the Christ messiah, the Son of God, much like a gnostic special knowledge.  Somehow, Jesus had power over these unclean spirits.