King Ahaziah joins with King Jehoram of Israel (2 Chr 22:5-22:6)

“He even followed their advice. He went with King Jehoram of Israel, the son of Ahab, to make war against King Hazael of Aram at Ramoth-gilead. The Arameans wounded King Jehoram. He returned to Jezreel to be healed of the wounds which he had received at Ramah, when he fought against King Hazael of Aram. King Ahaziah son of King Jehoram of Judah went down to see King Jehoram son of King Ahab in Jezreel, because he was sick.”

Once again this is very close to 2 Kings, chapter 8. He followed the advice of his counselors and went to battle with his uncle King Jehoram of Israel at Ramoth-gilead. This seems to be a favorite spot to do battle with the Arameans. This is the same spot where King Ahab of Israel was killed when King Jehoshaphat of Judah went to fight the Arameans in 1 Kings, chapter 22. Now it is 12 years later when disaster strikes again. King Jehoram of Israel was wounded so that he returned to Jezreel. His nephew, King Ahaziah went to see him there at Jezreel because he was sick or wounded as in 2 Kings.

The prophecy of success (2 Chr 18:9-18:11)

“Now the king of Israel and King Jehoshaphat of Judah were sitting on their thrones, arrayed in their robes. They were sitting at the threshing floor at the entrance of the gate of Samaria. All the prophets were prophesying before them. Zedekiah son of Chenaanah made for himself horns of iron. He said. ‘Thus says Yahweh. ‘With these you shall gore the Arameans until they are destroyed.’ All the prophets were prophesying the same and saying. ‘Go up to Ramoth-gilead and triumph. Yahweh will give it into the hand of the king.’”

Once again, this is word for word from 1 Kings, chapter 22. Most of the great discussions took place at the gate to the town. The 2 kings sat on their thrones listening to the prophets of Queen Jezebel of Israel proclaim that Yahweh would guarantee success for this battle. This prophet Zedekiah is not to be confused with the later King Zedekiah. He made horns of iron that showed how the Arameans would be destroyed. These horns symbolized the victory of the 2 kings. These were common war instruments worn on the head to show how fierce you were. The 400 prophets saw nothing but success.

 

The prophets of Jezebel (2 Chr 18:4-18:8)

“King Jehoshaphat said to the king of Israel. ‘Inquire first for the word of Yahweh.’ Then the king of Israel gathered together the prophets, four hundred of them. He said to them. ‘Shall we go to battle against Ramoth-gilead, or shall I refrain?’ They said. ‘Go up! God will give it into the hand of the king.’ But King Jehoshaphat said. ‘Is there no other prophet of Yahweh here of whom we may inquire?’ The king of Israel said to King Jehoshaphat. ‘There is still one other by whom we may inquire of Yahweh, Micaiah son of Imlah. But I hate him. He never prophesies anything favorable about me, but only disaster.’ King Jehoshaphat said. ‘Let the king not say such a thing.’ Then the king of Israel summoned an officer. He said. ‘Bring quickly Micaiah son of Imlah.’”

One again, we are dependent practically word for word on 1 Kings, chapter 22. King Jehoshaphat of Judah wanted to consult with the prophets before going to battle. Now the prophets in Israel were the friendly prophets of Queen Jezebel, the wife of King Ahab. They were not exactly Yahweh prophets. They agreed that it would be a good idea to go to battle. King Jehoshaphat was still not convinced and wanted another opinion. He wanted a prophet of Yahweh. King Ahab said that there was this negative prophet Micaiah but he always brought bad news. Nevertheless, he summoned him to come to the king.

The alliance with King Ahab of Israel (2 Chr 18:1-18:3)

“King Jehoshaphat had great riches and honor. He made a marriage alliance with King Ahab. After some years he went down to King Ahab in Samaria. King Ahab slaughtered an abundance of sheep and oxen for him and for the people who were with him. He induced him to go up against Ramoth-gilead. King Ahab of Israel said to King Jehoshaphat of Judah. ‘Will you go with me to Ramoth-gilead?’ He answered him. ‘I am with you. My people are your people. We will be with you in the war.’”

Now we are back to following 1 Kings, chapter 22. There appears to be a truce with northern Israel as King Jehoshaphat of Judah made a marriage alliance with King Ahab of Israel. His son Jehoram, who would be king after him, married Athaliah, the daughter of King Ahab. This biblical author does not explain it like in 1 Kings. Thus it looks like there is going to be reconciliation between Judah and Israel. The king of Judah went to Samaria, which was the capital of Israel. There they sacrificed sheep and oxen, which would have been against the idea of all sacrifices at Jerusalem. King Ahab induced King Jehoshaphat to go with him to take back Ramon-gilead which was on the east side of the Jordan River. King Jehoshaphat responded that he was in complete agreement. He and his people were at their disposal. It seems like King Jehoshaphat is a little dependent on King Ahab, despite all his great military power.

The four hundred prophets prophesize about success (1 Kings 22:10-22:12)

“Now the king of Israel and King Jehoshaphat of Judah were sitting on their thrones, arrayed in their robes, at the threshing floor at the entrance of the gate of Samaria. All the prophets were prophesying before them. Zedekiah son of Chenaanah made for himself horns of iron. He said. ‘Thus says Yahweh. ‘With these you shall gore the Arameans until they are destroyed.’ All the prophets were prophesying the same and saying. ‘Go up to Ramoth-gilead and triumph. Yahweh will give it into the hand of the king.’”

Most of the great discussions took place at the gate to the town. The 2 kings sat on their thrones listening to the prophets of Jezebel proclaim that Yahweh would guarantee success for this battle. This prophet Zedekiah is not to be confused with the later King Zedekiah. He made horns of iron that showed how the Arameans would be destroyed. The 400 prophets saw nothing but success