Have mercy on me! (Lk 18:39-18:39)

“Those who were

In front

Sternly ordered him

To be quiet.

But he shouted out

More loudly.

‘Son of David!

Have mercy on me!’”

 

καὶ οἱ προάγοντες ἐπετίμων αὐτῷ ἵνα σιγήσῃ· αὐτὸς δὲ πολλῷ μᾶλλον ἔκραζεν Υἱὲ Δαυείδ, ἐλέησόν με.

 

Luke indicated that those who were in front of the crowd (καὶ οἱ προάγοντες) sternly ordered the blind beggar (ἐπετίμων αὐτῷ) to be quiet (ἵνα σιγήσῃ).  Instead, he shouted out more loudly (αὐτὸς δὲ πολλῷ μᾶλλον ἔκραζεν) the same message “Son of David (Υἱὲ Δαυείδ)!  Have mercy on me (ἐλέησόν με)!”  Both Mark, chapter 10:48, and Matthew, chapter 20:31, have something similar.  Mark said that many in the crowd rebuked, admonished, or ordered Bartimaeus to be quiet or silent (καὶ ἐπετίμων αὐτῷ πολλοὶ ἵνα σιωπήσῃ).  But he shouted out even more loudly (ὁ δὲ πολλῷ μᾶλλον ἔκραζεν).  He repeated again what he had shouted out earlier.  He called Jesus, the Son of David (Υἱὲ Δαυείδ).  He wanted Jesus to have mercy on him. (ἐλέησόν με).  Matthew said that the crowd rebuked or admonished these two blind beggars to be quiet or silent (ὁ δὲ ὄχλος ἐπετίμησεν αὐτοῖς ἵνα σιωπήσωσιν).  But they shouted out even more loudly (οἱ δὲ μεῖζον ἔκραξαν λέγοντες).  They repeated again what they had shouted out earlier.  They called Jesus, Lord, the Son of David (Κύριε, υἱὸς Δαυείδ).  They wanted him to have mercy on them (ἐλέησον ἡμᾶς).  This Greek cry of “Κύριε, ἐλέησον” “kyrie eleison,” would become a Christian cry for mercy that has found its way into the Roman Catholic Liturgy of the Word at the beginning of the regular Sunday Mass service, with the “Lord, have mercy!”  Quite often, it is also part of a chant.  Do you ask Jesus, the Lord, to have mercy on you?

 

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The astonished parents were to be silent (Lk 8:56-8:56)

“Her parents

Were astonished.

But Jesus

Ordered them

To tell no one about

What had happened.”

 

καὶ ἐξέστησαν οἱ γονεῖς αὐτῆς· ὁ δὲ παρήγγειλεν αὐτοῖς μηδενὶ εἰπεῖν τὸ γεγονός

 

Luke said that her parents were astonished (καὶ ἐξέστησαν οἱ γονεῖς αὐτῆς).  However, Jesus ordered them to tell no one what had happened (ὁ δὲ παρήγγειλεν αὐτοῖς μηδενὶ εἰπεῖν τὸ γεγονός).  The ending to this story is different in Matthew, chapter 9:26 than that of Mark, chapter 5:43 and Luke, who are similar.  Mark indicated that Jesus strictly instructed or ordered them that no one should know about this incident.  That would have been hard because this was such a public event.  In Matthew, this event spread all over this land or district without any attempt to keep it quiet, which was the opposite of Luke and Mark.  If you saw a miraculous event, would you be quiet about it or tell everyone?

People listen to Jesus (Lk 5:15-5:15)

“But now,

More than ever,

The word

About Jesus

Spread abroad.

Many crowds

Would gather

To hear him.

He cured many

Of their diseases.”

 

διήρχετο δὲ μᾶλλον ὁ λόγος περὶ αὐτοῦ, καὶ συνήρχοντο ὄχλοι πολλοὶ ἀκούειν καὶ θεραπεύεσθαι ἀπὸ τῶν ἀσθενειῶν αὐτῶν

 

This is more or less a unique saying of Luke, who said that now, more than ever, the word or report about Jesus spread abroad (διήρχετο δὲ μᾶλλον ὁ λόγος περὶ αὐτοῦ,).  Many large crowds would gather to hear him (καὶ συνήρχοντο ὄχλοι πολλοὶ ἀκούειν).  Then he cured many people of their diseases (αὶ θεραπεύεσθαι ἀπὸ τῶν ἀσθενειῶν αὐτῶν).  There is nothing like this in MatthewMark, chapter 1:45, on the other hand, said that after this cleansed leper went away, he began to proclaim what had happened to him.  Then the news about his cleansing spread around, so that Jesus was no longer able to openly enter into a city or town.  He had to stay out in the solitary deserted countryside.  Nevertheless, the people came to him from all around the area or from various quarters.  The cleansed leper did not keep quiet, so that this led to more consternation for Jesus.  Luke was not that explicit, but hinted at it.

The demons recognize Jesus (Lk 4:41-4:41)

“Demons also

Came out

Of many people.

They were shouting.

‘You are the Son of God!’

But he rebuked them.

He would not allow them

To speak,

Because they knew

That he was the Messiah,

The Christ.”

 

ἐξήρχετο δὲ καὶ δαιμόνια ἀπὸ πολλῶν, κραυγάζοντα καὶ λέγοντα ὅτι Σὺ εἶ ὁ Υἱὸς τοῦ Θεοῦ. καὶ ἐπιτιμῶν οὐκ εἴα αὐτὰ λαλεῖν, ὅτι ᾔδεισαν τὸν Χριστὸν αὐτὸν εἶναι.

 

Luke also had Jesus cast out demons.  He said that these demons came out of many people (ἐξήρχετο δὲ καὶ δαιμόνια ἀπὸ πολλῶν).  They were saying or shouting out (κραυγάζοντα καὶ λέγοντα) that Jesus was the Son of God (ὅτι Σὺ εἶ ὁ Υἱὸς τοῦ Θεοῦ).  But Jesus rebuked, admonished, or warned them (καὶ ἐπιτιμῶν).  He would not allow them to speak (οὐκ εἴα αὐτὰ λαλεῖν), because they knew that he was the Messiah, the Christ (ὅτι ᾔδεισαν τὸν Χριστὸν αὐτὸν εἶναι).  Matthew, chapter 8:16, has something similar, but Jesus cast out these demons with simply a word.  Mark, chapter 1:34, is also similar.  However, there like here, the cast out demons also knew and spoke out that Jesus was the Messiah, the Son of God.  This idea of not telling people that Jesus was the Christ or Messiah has come to be known as the Messianic secret.  Those who knew about the true role of Jesus were told to be quiet about it.  Why did the demons know about this?

They kept the secret (Mk 9:10-9:10)

“Thus,

They kept the matter

To themselves.

They questioned

What the rising

From the dead

Meant.”

 

καὶ τὸν λόγον ἐκράτησαν πρὸς ἑαυτοὺς συνζητοῦντες τί ἐστιν τὸ ἐκ νεκρῶν ἀναστῆναι.

 

This is another unique passage of Mark, who tended to point out how these 3 trusted disciples, Peter, James, and John, were confused and still did not understand what was happening.  Mark said that the 3 apostles were able to keep this matter quiet among themselves (καὶ τὸν λόγον ἐκράτησαν πρὸς ἑαυτοὺς).  However, they questioned or discussed this among themselves (συνζητοῦντες) what the rising from the dead (τί ἐστιν τὸ ἐκ νεκρῶν ἀναστῆναι) was all about.

 

Do not tell anyone (Mk 7:36-7:36)

“Jesus ordered them

To tell no one.

But the more

He ordered them,

The more zealously

They proclaimed it.”

 

καὶ διεστείλατο αὐτοῖς ἵνα μηδενὶ λέγωσιν· ὅσον δὲ αὐτοῖς διεστέλλετο, αὐτοὶ μᾶλλον περισσότερον ἐκήρυσσον.

 

Once again, this unique saying of Mark had Jesus order or instruct this man and the crowd with him (καὶ διεστείλατο αὐτοῖς) not to tell anyone about it (ἵνα μηδενὶ λέγωσιν).  However, the more he ordered or instructed them to be quiet (ὅσον δὲ αὐτοῖς διεστέλλετο,), the more zealously they proclaimed it (αὐτοὶ μᾶλλον περισσότερον ἐκήρυσσον).  This was the strange Messianic secret that no one could keep secret.  The ironic twist was that the crowds saw what was happening, yet Jesus was trying not to let people tell others.  On the other hand, he would send his apostles out to preach.  What did he expect to happen?

Jesus told them not to tell anyone (Mk 5:43-5:43)

“Jesus strictly ordered them.

No one should know this.

He told them

To give her something

To eat.”

 

καὶ διεστείλατο αὐτοῖς πολλὰ ἵνα μηδεὶς γνοῖ τοῦτο, καὶ εἶπεν δοθῆναι αὐτῇ φαγεῖν.

 

The ending to this story is different in Matthew, chapter 9:26 than that of Mark and Luke, chapter 8:55-56, that are similar.  Mark indicated that Jesus strictly instructed or ordered them (καὶ διεστείλατο αὐτοῖς πολλὰ) that no one should know about this incident (ἵνα μηδεὶς γνοῖ τοῦτο).  That would have been hard because this was such a public event.  However, Jesus told them to give the young girl something to eat (καὶ εἶπεν δοθῆναι αὐτῇ φαγεῖν).  In Matthew, this event spread all over this land or district without any attempt to keep it quiet.