The curse for David’s enemies (Ps 69:22-69:29)

“Let their own table be a trap for them!

Let their own table be a snare for their allies!

Let their eyes be darkened,

So that they cannot see!

Make their loins tremble continually!

Pour out your indignation upon them!

Let our burning anger overtake them!

May their camp be desolation!

Let no one live in their tents!

They persecute those

Whom you have struck down.

They persecute those

Whom you have wounded.

They attack still more.

Add guilt to their guilt!

May they have no acquittal from you!

Let them be blotted out of the book of the living!

Let them not be enrolled among the righteous!

But I am lowly.

I am in pain.

Let your salvation!

O God!

Protect me high!”

These are a series of curses or wishes against the enemies of David. His enemies’ tables should be a trap or snare to them and their friends. He wanted them to lose their sight and to tremble all the time. God’s indignation and anger should be upon them. Their camp should be desolate so that they could not live in their tents. They had persecuted and attacked those who had been wounded. Their guilt pilled on guilt. They should not be acquitted. They should be blotted out of the book of the living. They should not be listed among the righteous. They should die. Then there is the cry of David to protect him and bring him salvation.

Shameful situation (Ps 69:19-69:21)

“You know

The insults that I receive.

You know

My shame.

You know

My dishonor.

My foes are all known to you.

Insults have broken my heart.

I am in despair.

I looked for pity,

But there was none.

I look for comforters,

But I found none.

They gave me poison for food.

For my thirst

They gave me vinegar to drink.”

David goes on to let God know his situation. He begins by reminding him that God knows all the things that were happening to him and who was doing it. God knew about the insults, the shame, and the dishonor. He had a broken heart and was in despair. There was no one to pity him or comfort him. Instead they gave him poison to eat and vinegar to drink. He was in bad shape. Obviously he was not in jail, but somehow persecuted.

The hope of a quick response (Ps 69:16-69:18)

“Answer me!,

Yahweh!

Your steadfast love is good.

According to your abundant mercy,

Turn to me!

Do not hide your face from your servant!

I am in distress!

Make haste to answer me!

Draw near to me!

Redeem me!

Set me free

Because of my enemies!”

Now there is a change in tone. No longer is David waiting for a response. Now he wanted an answer right away. He pleaded to the goodness of God, his love for him, and his great mercy. He was in distress. He did not want God to hide his face from him. He wanted a hasty response. He wanted God close to him. He wanted God to see him so that he could be freed from his enemies. He wanted to be redeemed.

The prayer to Yahweh (Ps 69:13-69:15)

“But as for me,

My prayer is to you.

Yahweh!

At an acceptable time!

O God!

In the abundance of your steadfast love

Answer me!

With your faithful help,

Rescue me

From sinking in the mire!

Let me be delivered

From my enemies!

Let me be delivered

From the deep waters!

Do not let

The flood sweep over me!

Do not let

The deep swallow me up!

Do not let

The pit closes its mouth over me!”

David prayed to Yahweh. He was willing to get a response at an acceptable time from God. He knew that God loved him. Thus he wanted to be rescued from sinking in mud. He wanted to be free of his enemies. He wanted to get away from the deep waters. He did not want the flood to come and swallow him up. He certainly did not want to go down to his grave, the pit that would swallow him up. This time of the flood of water overtaking him continued from the opening verses.

The difficult situation of David (Ps 69:9-69:12)

“It is zeal for your house

That has consumed me.

The insults of those

Who insult you

Have fallen on me.

When I humbled my soul with fasting,

They insulted me for doing so.

When I made sackcloth my clothing,

I became a byword to them.

I am the subject of gossip

For those who sit in the gate.

The drunkards make songs about me.”

David explained his situation. He had great zeal for the house of Yahweh that he was about to construct. However, he felt that the insults against Yahweh had fallen on him. He had fasted but people insulted him for doing that. He was wearing mourning sackcloth, but all they did was gossip about him in the public meeting places at the gate. Even the drunkards were making up songs about him.

The plight of David (Ps 69:6-69:8)

“Do not let those who hope in you

Be put to shame

Because of me!

Yahweh!

God of hosts!

Do not let those who seek you

Be dishonored

Because of me!

O God of Israel!

It is for your sake

That I have borne reproach!

It is for your sake

That shame has covered my face.

I have become

A stranger to my kindred.

I have become

An alien to my mother’s sons.”

David has brought shame to those who believed in Yahweh. They were being dishonored because of what David had done. He maintains that he did whatever he did for the sake of God. He was personally willing to bare this blame and shame. He had become a stranger to his relatives and an alien to his brothers because of this incident.

The haters (Ps 69:4-69:5)

“More in number

Than the hairs of my head

Are those who hate me without cause.

Mighty are those who would destroy me.

My enemies accuse me falsely.

What did I not steal?

Must I now restore them?

O God!

You know my folly!

The wrongs I have done

Are not hidden from you.”

The numerous haters of David did so without cause. Apparently David believed that it was okay to hate with a good cause. These haters were more than the hairs on David’s head. His enemies wanted to destroy him. They made false accusations against him. There is something about stealing stuff that he needed to restore. He must have done something because he confesses his folly. God knows the various wrongs that he has done since they are not hidden from him.