The only daughter of Jairus (Lk 8:42-8:42)

“Jairus had

An only daughter,

About twelve years old.

She was dying.

As Jesus went,

The crowds

Pressed in on him.”

 

ὅτι θυγάτηρ μονογενὴς ἦν αὐτῷ ὡς ἐτῶν δώδεκα καὶ αὐτὴ ἀπέθνῃσκεν. Ἐν δὲ τῷ ὑπάγειν αὐτὸν οἱ ὄχλοι συνέπνιγον αὐτόν.

 

Luke said that Jairus had an only daughter (ὅτι θυγάτηρ μονογενὴς ἦν αὐτῷ), about 12 years old (ὡς ἐτῶν δώδεκα).  She was dying (καὶ αὐτὴ ἀπέθνῃσκεν).  As Jesus went (Ἐν δὲ τῷ ὑπάγειν αὐτὸν), the crowds pressed in on him (οἱ ὄχλοι συνέπνιγον αὐτόν).  This episode about the request from the synagogue leader about his daughter can be found in Matthew, chapter 9:18-19, but there this leader said that his daughter had just died.  Luke mentioned that Jairus’ daughter was 12 years old, but dying.  Mark, chapter 5:23-24, said that she was very sick, not dead.  Mark said that Jairus, the synagogue leader, begged Jesus, saying that his little daughter was near the end of her life.  He wanted Jesus to come and lay his hands on her, so that she would be cured and live.  This synagogue leader had a great belief in Jesus.  Jesus responded immediately, without saying anything.  Jesus simply got up and went with Jairus.  However, a large crowd also followed them, so that this crowd pressed against him.  Matthew said that Jairus spoke to Jesus telling him that his daughter had just died.  There was no mention of this in other two synoptic gospels.  In Mark, she was very sick, not dead.  However, his belief in the power of Jesus was clear.  He said that if Jesus came, he could lay his hand on her.  Then she would live.  This leader had a great belief in Jesus to raise the dead.  Jesus then responded immediately, without saying anything.  He simply got up with his disciples.  They followed this leader.  Do you believe in the power of Jesus?

The healing power (Lk 6:19-6:19)

“All the crowd

Were trying

To touch him.

Power

Came out

From Jesus.

He healed

All of them.”

 

καὶ πᾶς ὁ ὄχλος ἐζήτουν ἅπτεσθαι αὐτοῦ, ὅτι δύναμις παρ’ αὐτοῦ ἐξήρχετο καὶ ἰᾶτο πάντας

 

Luke said that all the people in the crowds were trying to touch Jesus (καὶ πᾶς ὁ ὄχλος ἐζήτουν ἅπτεσθαι αὐτοῦ).  Power came out from him (ὅτι δύναμις παρ’ αὐτοῦ), as he went around healing all of them (ἐξήρχετο καὶ ἰᾶτο πάντας).  Mark, chapter 3:10, said that Jesus had cured many people, so that everyone pressed or crushed around him.  All the people with diseases hoped to touch him to be healed of their illness.  Jesus had a magic like healing power.

Jesus went with Jairus (Mk 5:24-5:24)

“Thus,

Jesus went with Jairus.

A large crowd

Followed him.

They pressed in

On him.”

 

καὶ ἀπῆλθεν μετ’ αὐτοῦ. καὶ ἠκολούθει αὐτῷ ὄχλος πολύς, καὶ συνέθλιβον αὐτόν.

 

Matthew, chapter 9:19, and Luke, chapter 8:42, are similar in showing that Jesus responded immediately, without saying anything.  Mark said that Jesus simply got up and went with Jairus (καὶ ἀπῆλθεν μετ’ αὐτοῦ).  However, a large crowd also followed them (καὶ ἠκολούθει αὐτῷ ὄχλος πολύς).  This crowd pressed against him (καὶ συνέθλιβον αὐτόν).

Big crowds (Mk 3:20-3:20)

“Then Jesus went home.

The crowd came together again.

Thus,

They could not even eat.”

 

Καὶ ἔρχεται εἰς οἶκον· καὶ συνέρχεται πάλιν ὁ ὄχλος, ὥστε μὴ δύνασθαι αὐτοὺς μηδὲ ἄρτον φαγεῖν.

 

Like Matthew, Mark put a lot of emphasis on the crowds that surrounded Jesus.  However, this short statement was unique to Mark, who said that Jesus went home or to his house (Καὶ ἔρχεται εἰς οἶκον), probably referring to Capernaum or Nazareth.  The crowds once again pressed against him or gathered around him (καὶ συνέρχεται πάλιν ὁ ὄχλος).  It was so bad, that they were not able to even eat their bread meals (ὥστε μὴ δύνασθαι αὐτοὺς μηδὲ ἄρτον φαγεῖν).

Many wanted to be healed (Mk 3:10-3:10)

“Jesus had cured

Many people.

Thus,

All who had diseases

Pressed upon him

To touch him.”

 

πολλοὺς γὰρ ἐθεράπευσεν, ὥστε ἐπιπίπτειν αὐτῷ ἵνα αὐτοῦ ἅψωνται ὅσοι εἶχον μάστιγας.

 

This is another unique summary by Mark, where traces can be found in the other synoptic gospels.  Mark said that Jesus had cured many people (πολλοὺς γὰρ ἐθεράπευσεν).  Thus, everyone pressed or crushed around him (ὥστε ἐπιπίπτειν αὐτῷ).  All the people with diseases hoped to touch him (ἵνα αὐτοῦ ἅψωνται ὅσοι εἶχον μάστιγας).  They all wanted to be healed of their illness.

 

The battle at Carnaim with Timothy (2 Macc 12:17-12:23)

“When they had gone ninety-five miles from there, they came to Charax, to the Jews who are called Toubiani. They did not find Timothy in that region, for he had by then left there without accomplishing anything. Although in one place, he had left a very strong garrison. Dositheus and Sosipater, who were the captains under Judas Maccabeus, marched out. They destroyed those whom Timothy had left in the stronghold, more than ten thousand men. However, Judas Maccabeus arranged his army in divisions as he set men in command of these divisions. He hastened after Timothy, who had with him one hundred twenty thousand infantry and two thousand five hundred cavalry. When Timothy learned of the approach of Judas Maccabeus, he sent off the women and the children with the baggage to a place called Carnaim that was hard to besiege. It was difficult to access because of the narrowness of all its approaches. But when Judas Maccabeus’ first division appeared, terror and fear came over the enemy at the manifestation to them of him, who sees all things. They rushed headlong in every direction, so that often they were injured by their own men and pierced by the points of their own swords. Judas Maccabeus pressed the pursuit with the utmost vigor. He put the sinners to the sword. He destroyed as many as thirty thousand men.”

Once again, this is similar to the battles in Gilead in 1 Maccabees, chapter 5. Charax might be present day Kuwait. Apparently they were looking for the elusive Timothy, who had already died in chapter 10 of this book. Dositheus and Sosipater were the captains of Judas Maccabeus on the east side of the Jordan River. They had already destroyed 10,000 of Timothy’s men. However, he had an enormous amount of troops, 125,000 infantry and 2,500 cavalry. Yet he was afraid of Judas Maccabeus. He sent all the women and children with the baggage to Carnaim, because it would be difficult to besiege that place due to its narrow approaches. As usual, the men of Judas Maccabeus pressed after the men of Timothy. Those men were so afraid of the God of Judas Maccabeus and his men that they ran in every which way so that they injured their own troops with their own swords. Nevertheless, Judas Maccabeus and his troops killed 30,000 men. These numbers are enormous here.

The divine intervention at Beth-zur (2 Macc 11:5-11:12)

“Invading Judea, Lysias approached Beth-zur, which was a fortified place about five stadia from Jerusalem. He pressed it hard. When Judas Maccabeus and his men got word that Lysias was besieging the strongholds, they and all the people, with lamentations and tears, prayed the Lord to send a good angel to save Israel. Judas Maccabeus himself was the first to take up arms. He urged the others to risk their lives with him to aid their kindred. Then they eagerly rushed off together. There, while they were still near Jerusalem, a horseman appeared at their head, clothed in white and brandishing weapons of gold. Together they all praised the merciful God. They were strengthened in heart, ready to assail not only humans, but the wildest animals or walls of iron. They advanced in battle order, having their heavenly ally, for the Lord had mercy on them. They hurled themselves like lions against the enemy. They laid low eleven thousand of them and sixteen hundred cavalry. They forced all the rest to flee. Most of them got away stripped and wounded. Lysias himself escaped by disgraceful flight.”

Beth-zur was about 20 miles south of Jerusalem, on the way to Hebron. Here, like 1 Maccabees, chapter 4, Judas Maccabeus prayed for a heavenly angel to help him. Although he had prayed in 1 Maccabees, there was no divine intervention. Here a heavenly horseman with a gold weapon led them to victory as they were lions in battle. Here they killed 11,000 infantry instead of 5,000 as in 1 Maccabees. In both versions of the story, Lysias escaped, either as here in “disgraceful flight” or simply withdrawing to Antioch as in 1 Maccabees.