Jesus prayed again (Mk 14:39-14:39)

“Again,

Jesus went away.

He prayed,

Saying

The same words.”

 

καὶ πάλιν ἀπελθὼν προσηύξατο τὸν αὐτὸν λόγον εἰπών.

 

This is similar to Matthew, chapter 26:42, but he has the actual words instead of “the same words.”  In Luke, chapter 22, and John, chapter 22, there was nothing more about these 2nd and 3rd prayers of Jesus.  Mark indicated that again, Jesus went away, for a 2nd time (καὶ πάλιν ἀπελθὼν).  He prayed to his Father (προσηύξατο) once again.  This time Mark said that Jesus used the same words that he had said the first time (τὸν αὐτὸν λόγον εἰπών).  Matthew indicated what these words were.  Jesus said that if this cannot pass unless he drank it, then his Father’s will should be done.  Clearly, Jesus would have preferred not to undergo this great suffering.  However, he subordinated his will to the will of his Father again.

Second prayer of Jesus (Mt 26:42-26:42)

“Again,

Jesus went away

For the second time.

He prayed.

‘My Father!

If this cannot pass

Unless I drink it,

Your will be done.’”

 

πάλιν ἐκ δευτέρου ἀπελθὼν προσηύξατο λέγων Πάτερ μου, εἰ οὐ δύναται τοῦτο παρελθεῖν ἐὰν μὴ αὐτὸ πίω, γενηθήτω τὸ θέλημά σου.

 

This is similar to Mark, chapter 14:39, where it is in an abbreviated form.  In Luke, chapter 22, and John, chapter 22, there is nothing more about these 2nd and 3rd prayers of Jesus.  Again, Jesus went away for a 2nd time (πάλιν ἐκ δευτέρου ἀπελθὼν).  He prayed to his Father (προσηύξατο λέγων Πάτερ μου) once again.  This time he said that if this cannot pass (εἰ οὐ δύναται τοῦτο παρελθεῖν), unless he drank it (ἐὰν μὴ αὐτὸ πίω), then his Father’s will should be done (, γενηθήτω τὸ θέλημά σου).  Clearly, Jesus would have preferred not to undergo this great suffering.  However, he subordinated his will to his Father again.

The worship on the mountain tops (Hos 4:13-4:13)

“They sacrifice

On the tops

Of the mountains.

They make offerings

Upon the hills.

They make offerings

Under the oak trees,

Under the poplar trees,

Under the terebinth trees.

Their shade is good.

Therefore,

Your daughters

Play the prostitute.

Your daughters-in-law

Commit adultery.”

The Israelites were sacrificing to the various Canaanite gods on the tops of the mountains. They were making offerings on the hills. They preferred to make these offerings under the various trees, the oak, the poplar, and the terebinth, because the shade of those trees was good. Thus, their daughters became prostitutes, while their daughters-in-law committed adultery. Clearly, they were unfaithful to Yahweh.

Job realizes that he has no help (Job 6:8-6:13)

“O that I might have my request!

That God would grant my desire!

That it would please God to crush me!

That he would let loose his hand!

That he would cut me off!

This would be my consolation.

I would even exult in unrelenting pain.

I have not denied the words of the Holy One.

What is my strength?

Why should I wait?

What is my end?

Why should I be patient?

Is my strength the strength of stones?

Is my flesh bronze?

In truth,

I have no help in me.

Any resource is driven from me.”

Job has one request, to be crushed by God. Death would be preferred to his present situation. He has never denied the words of the Holy One, God, without explaining what these words were. Then he asked a series of questions. What is his strength that he should wait longer? What is his end and why should he be patient? Does he have the strength of stones and the flesh of bronze? These sarcastic questions led him to realize he had no help. All his resources were gone. He sounded like a crushed man. He seemed like he had been abandoned by everybody. In fact, it seems like this is the impatient Job, not the hero of patience.

The letter of King Antiochus V to Lysias (2 Macc 11:22-11:26)

“King Antiochus’ letter ran thus.

‘King Antiochus to his brother Lysias,

Greetings!

Now that our father has gone on to the gods,

We desire that the subjects of the kingdom

Be undisturbed in caring for their own affairs.

We have heard that the Jews

Do not consent to our father’s change to Greek customs

But they prefer their own way of living.

They ask that their own customs be allowed them.

Accordingly, since we choose

That this nation also should be free from disturbance,

Our decision is that their temple be restored to them,

That they shall live

According to the customs of their ancestors.

You will do well, therefore,

To send word to them.

Give them pledges of friendship,

So that they may know our policy.

They may be of good cheer,

Let them go on happily in the conduct of their own affairs.’”

The young King Antiochus V noted the death of his father, King Antiochus IV, since he had gone on to the gods. He did not want people in the kingdom disturbed. He had learned that the Jews did not like the Greek customs imposed on them by his father, but they preferred their own customs. The 10 year old king decided that the Temple should be restored. They should be allowed to follow the customs of their ancestors. He was pledging his friendship so that they should be of good cheer and happily conduct their own affairs. Everything seems to be in good order with this agreement.