Peace (Eph. 6:23)

“Peace be

To the whole brotherly community!

Love with faith,

From God

The Father,

And the Lord

Jesus Christ.”

Εἰρήνη τοῖς ἀδελφοῖς καὶ ἀγάπη μετὰ πίστεως ἀπὸ Θεοῦ Πατρὸς καὶ Κυρίου Ἰησοῦ Χριστοῦ.

Paul said, “Peace (Εἰρήνη) be to the whole brotherly community (τοῖς ἀδελφοῖς)!  Love (καὶ ἀγάπη) with faith (μετὰ πίστεως), from God (ἀπὸ Θεοῦ) the Father (Πατρὸς), and the Lord (καὶ Κυρίου) Jesus Christ (Ἰησοῦ Χριστοῦ).”  Paul then gave his final blessing.  He wanted them to live in peace in their loving brotherly community in Ephesus.  He was sending them love with faith from God the Father and the Lord Jesus Christ.  Thus, Paul left them with the three main themes of peace, love, and faith from God and Jesus Christ.  Is peace, love, and faith part of your life?

The hidden things (Lk 19:42-19:42)

“Jesus said.

‘If you,

Even you,

Had only recognized

On this day,

The things

That make for peace!

But now,

They are hidden

From your eyes.’”

 

λέγων ὅτι Εἰ ἔγνως ἐν τῇ ἡμέρᾳ ταύτῃ καὶ σὺ τὰ πρὸς εἰρήνην· νῦν δὲ ἐκρύβη ἀπὸ ὀφθαλμῶν σου

 

Luke uniquely indicated what Jesus said (λέγων) to the people of Jerusalem.  If only they had recognized or known (ὅτι Εἰ ἔγνως) on this day (ἐν τῇ ἡμέρᾳ ταύτῃ), today, the things that make peace (καὶ σὺ τὰ πρὸς εἰρήνην)!  However, all that was now hidden (νῦν δὲ ἐκρύβη) from their eyes (ἀπὸ ὀφθαλμῶν σου).  The very name of Jerusalem suggested peace.  Now, here was the prince of peace, the messianic peace maker that was mentioned in Isaiah, chapter 11.  He had come to Jerusalem in the person of Jesus.  However, the people of Jerusalem could not see it, because it was hidden from them.  Why it was hidden was not clear.  The ancient Israelite prophets had often condemned Jerusalem for its unfaithfulness.  Jesus was now there, but they did not recognize him, since only a few did.  Would you have recognized Jesus?

Throw the bad salt away (Lk 14:35-14:35)

“This salt is fit

Neither

For the soil,

Nor for the manure pile.

Throw it away!

Let anyone

With ears

To hear,

Listen!”

 

οὔτε εἰς γῆν οὔτε εἰς κοπρίαν εὔθετόν ἐστιν· ἔξω βάλλουσιν αὐτό. ὁ ἔχων ὦτα ἀκούειν ἀκουέτω

 

Luke indicated that Jesus said that this salt was fit (εὔθετόν ἐστιν) neither for the soil (οὔτε εἰς γῆν), nor for the manure pile (οὔτε εἰς κοπρίαν).  It should be thrown away (ἔξω βάλλουσιν αὐτό).  Let anyone with ears to hear (ὁ ἔχων ὦτα ἀκούειν), listen (ἀκουέτω)!  This saying of Jesus can be found somewhat similar in Matthew, chapter 5:13, and Mark, chapter 9:50.  Matthew indicated that Jesus said that tasteless salt was now useless, impotent, and not good for anything (εἰς οὐδὲν ἰσχύει ἔτι).  The end result of this insipid salt was that it should either be thrown away (εἰ μὴ βληθὲν ἔξω) or have people trample it down (καταπατεῖσθαι ὑπὸ τῶν ἀνθρώπων).  Mark indicated that Jesus then turned to his followers.  He told them that they should have salt within themselves (ἔχετε ἐν ἑαυτοῖς ἅλα), not exactly the salt of the earth, but close enough.  They should be at peace with one another (καὶ εἰρηνεύετε ἐν ἀλλήλοις).  There was no indication here about throwing salt away because it had become useless, as in Matthew and Luke.  Salt would bring about brotherly peace or love.  Only Luke had the admonition to listen to what Jesus was saying.  How much salt do you use?

Armed strong man (Lk 11:21-11:21)

“When a strong man,

Fully armed,

Guards his castle,

His property

Is safe.”

 

ὅταν ὁ ἰσχυρὸς καθωπλισμένος φυλάσσῃ τὴν ἑαυτοῦ αὐλήν, ἐν εἰρήνῃ ἐστὶν τὰ ὑπάρχοντα αὐτοῦ·

 

Luke uniquely indicated that Jesus said that when a strong man (ὅταν ὁ ἰσχυρὸς), fully armed (καθωπλισμένος), guarded his castle (φυλάσσῃ τὴν ἑαυτοῦ αὐλήν), his property or possessions would be safe and at peace (ἐν εἰρήνῃ ἐστὶν τὰ ὑπάρχοντα αὐτοῦ).  Both Mark and Matthew have the attack on the house that is in the next verse, but without the setup of guarding the castle as here in Luke.  How do you guard your house or castle?

Faith heals (Lk 8:48-8:48)

“Jesus said to her.

‘Daughter!

Your faith

Has made you well!

Go in peace!’”

 

ὁ δὲ εἶπεν αὐτῇ Θυγάτηρ, ἡ πίστις σου σέσωκέν σε· πορεύου εἰς εἰρήνην

 

Luke indicated that Jesus said to her (ὁ δὲ εἶπεν αὐτῇ), calling her daughter (Θυγάτηρ), that her faith had saved her or made her well (ἡ πίστις σου σέσωκέν σε).  Using the second person singular imperative, he told her that she was to go in peace (πορεύου εἰς εἰρήνην).  This ending to the healing of this woman with the flowing blood was nearly the same in Matthew, chapter 9:22, and Mark, chapter 5:34.  Mark had pretty much the same narrative as Luke.  Like the other healings, Jesus said to this woman that her faith had healed, cured, or saved her.  He called her “daughter (Θυγάτηρ).”  He told her to go in peace.  This woman was cured of her affliction or disease, as faith was a key ingredient in this healing, as in every healing.  Matthew was slightly different.  He said that Jesus realized that power had gone forth from him.  Jesus then turned around and saw her.  He realized what she was thinking.  Like the other times, Jesus said that her faith had saved or cured her.  He called her “daughter (θύγατερ).”  He told her to have courage and take heart.  With that, this woman was cured at that very hour, rather than at the initial touching of the garment, as in the other 2 synoptics.  Faith was a key ingredient in all these healings.  How strong is your faith?

Your faith saves you (Lk 7:50-7:50)

“Jesus said

To the woman.

‘Your faith

Has saved you!

Go in peace!’”

 

εἶπεν δὲ πρὸς τὴν γυναῖκα Ἡ πίστις σου σέσωκέν σε· πορεύου εἰς εἰρήνην.

 

Luke uniquely indicated that Jesus said to this woman (εἶπεν δὲ πρὸς τὴν γυναῖκα) that her faith had saved her (Ἡ πίστις σου σέσωκέν σε).  Thus, she could go or travel in peace (πορεύου εἰς εἰρήνην).  Faith being a prerequisite for the forgiveness of sins was another common theme of Jesus and Luke.  Does your faith in Jesus save you?

Glory to God (Lk 2:14-2:14)

“The angels

Were saying.

‘Glory to God

In the highest heaven!

On earth,

Peace among those

Whom he favors!’”

 

καὶ λεγόντων

Δόξα ἐν ὑψίστοις Θεῷ καὶ ἐπὶ γῆς εἰρήνη ἐν ἀνθρώποις εὐδοκίας.

 

This is where the famous Latin song sung at Roman Catholic masses during the Liturgy of the Word “Gloria in excelsis Deo” comes from.  Luke indicated that these angels were saying (καὶ λεγόντων) or singing “Glory to God in the highest (Δόξα ἐν ὑψίστοις Θεῷ)!  On earth (καὶ ἐπὶ γῆς), peace be among the men (εἰρήνη ἐν ἀνθρώποις) whom he favors (εὐδοκίας), those of good will.”

 

The decree of Caesar Augustus (Lk 2:1-2:1)

“In those days,

A decree went out

From the Emperor

Caesar Augustus

That all the world

Should be registered.”

 

Ἐγένετο δὲ ἐν ταῖς ἡμέραις ἐκείναις ἐξῆλθεν δόγμα παρὰ Καίσαρος Αὐγούστου ἀπογράφεσθαι πᾶσαν τὴν οἰκουμένην.

 

Luke tried to put these events within a historical perspective.  He said that in those days (Ἐγένετο δὲ ἐν ταῖς ἡμέραις), a decree or dogma went out (ἐξῆλθεν δόγμα) from the Emperor, Caesar Augustus (παρὰ Καίσαρος Αὐγούστου), that all the world should be registered (ἀπογράφεσθαι πᾶσαν τὴν οἰκουμένην).  Could all the world be registered in a census?  Luke referred to the Roman Emperor, Caesar Augustus, who ruled the Roman empire with his famous Pax Romana, or peace everywhere, from 27 BCE to 14 CE, precisely the time of these events.  Augustus was born in 63 BCE so that he would have been 77 years old when he died.  He was sometimes called god, son of god, savior, or father.  As the adopted son of Julius Caesar, he defeated Mark Anthony and Cleopatra to gain sole control of the empire.  He set up an intricate set of taxes for the empire, so that there was a consent source of income.  Thus, the local tax collectors or publicans became rich, but disliked, official people in the empire.  The month of August was named after him, just as July was named after Julius Caesar.  However, there is no evidence of any call to register the whole world.  However, this would not have been inconsistent with his taxing plans, since the main reason for any registration or census would be for tax purposes.  Thus, this is possible, but unlikely.

Peace (Lk 1:79-1:79)

“God will give light

To those who

Sit in darkness.

He will give light

To those who

Sit in the shadow

Of death.

He will

Guide our feet

Into the way

Of peace.”

 

ἐπιφᾶναι τοῖς ἐν σκότει καὶ σκιᾷ θανάτου καθημένοις, τοῦ κατευθῦναι τοὺς πόδας ἡμῶν εἰς ὁδὸν εἰρήνης.

 

Luke concluded Zechariah’s canticle with a call to peace for all Israelites.  Zechariah said that God would give light or shine upon those who sat in darkness (ἐπιφᾶναι τοῖς ἐν σκότει).  He would also give light to those who sat in the shadow of death (καὶ σκιᾷ θανάτου καθημένοις).  He would guide their feet (τοῦ κατευθῦναι τοὺς πόδας ἡμῶν) into the way of peace (εἰς ὁδὸν εἰρήνης).  Once again, returning to prophetic expectations, Zechariah said that things would be good for those living in darkness or the shadow of death.  Hope or the messiah would come so that they would have the lasting peace that they so desired.

 

Jesus stops the storm (Mk 4:39-4:39)

“Jesus

Woke up.

He rebuked the wind.

He said to the sea.

‘Peace!

Be still!’

Then the wind ceased.

There was a dead calm.”

 

καὶ διεγερθεὶς ἐπετίμησεν τῷ ἀνέμῳ καὶ εἶπεν τῇ θαλάσσῃ Σιώπα, πεφίμωσο. καὶ ἐκόπασεν ὁ ἄνεμος, καὶ ἐγένετο γαλήνη μεγάλη.

 

This response of Jesus can be found in Matthew, chapter 8:26, and Luke, chapter 8:24, in a somewhat similar manner.  Mark said that after Jesus woke up (καὶ διεγερθεὶς), he then rebuked or admonished (ἐπετίμησεν) the wind (τῷ ἀνέμῳ).  Then he spoke to the sea itself (καὶ τῇ θαλάσσῃ), as he told the sea to be silent, peaceful, and still (Σιώπα, πεφίμωσο).  Thus, the wind abated or was still (αὶ ἐκόπασεν ὁ ἄνεμος) and there was a great calmness in the sea (καὶ ἐγένετο γαλήνη μεγάλη).