Your daughter is dead (Lk 8:49-8:49)

“While Jesus

Was still speaking,

Someone

From the synagogue leader

Came to say.

‘Your daughter

Is dead!

Do not trouble

The Teacher anymore!’”

 

Ἔτι αὐτοῦ λαλοῦντος ἔρχεταί τις παρὰ τοῦ ἀρχισυναγώγου λέγων ὅτι Τέθνηκεν ἡ θυγάτηρ σου, μηκέτι σκύλλε τὸν Διδάσκαλον.

 

Luke said that while Jesus was still speaking (Ἔτι αὐτοῦ λαλοῦντος), someone from the house of the synagogue leader came (ἔρχεταί τις παρὰ τοῦ ἀρχισυναγώγου) to tell him (λέγων) that his daughter was dead (Τέθνηκεν ἡ θυγάτηρ σου).  They should not trouble this teacher anymore (μηκέτι σκύλλε τὸν Διδάσκαλον).  Now we are back to the original story about the dying daughter of the synagogue leader.  Mark, chapter 5:35, was similar to Luke, almost word for word, while Matthew had this little girl already dead.  Mark said that while Jesus was still speaking, some people came from the synagogue leader’s household.  They told him that his daughter was dead.  Thus, there was no need to trouble the teacher anymore.  Notice that they called Jesus “teacher.”  The idea of curing the young girl was gone, since she had died.  Thus, Matthew was right when he said that she was dead.  Have you had a tragic death in your family?

Your daughter is dead (Mk 5:35-5:35)

“While Jesus

Was still speaking,

Some people came

From the leader’s house.

They said.

‘Your daughter

Is dead.

Why trouble the Teacher

Any further?’”

 

Ἔτι αὐτοῦ λαλοῦντος ἔρχονται ἀπὸ τοῦ ἀρχισυναγώγου λέγοντες ὅτι Ἡ θυγάτηρ σου ἀπέθανεν· τί ἔτι σκύλλεις τὸν διδάσκαλον;

 

Now back to the original story.  Luke, chapter 8:49, is similar to Mark, almost word for word, while Matthew had the little girl already dead.  Mark said that while Jesus was still speaking (Ἔτι αὐτοῦ λαλοῦντος), some people came from the synagogue leader’s house (ἔρχονται ἀπὸ τοῦ ἀρχισυναγώγου).  They told him that his daughter was dead (λέγοντες ὅτι Ἡ θυγάτηρ σου ἀπέθανεν).  Thus, there was no need to trouble the Teacher anymore (τί ἔτι σκύλλεις τὸν διδάσκαλον).  Notice that they called Jesus “teacher.”  The idea of curing the young girl was gone, since she had died.

The failure of the Egyptian magicians (Wis 17:7-17:10)

“The delusions of their magic art lay humbled.

Their boasted wisdom was scornfully rebuked.

Those who promised to drive off

The fears of a sick soul,

Those who promised to drive off

The disorders of a sick soul,

Were sick themselves

With ridiculous fear.

Even if nothing disturbing frightened them,

Yet scared by the passing of wild animals,

Scared by the hissing of serpents,

They perished in trembling fear.

They refused to look even at the air,

though it nowhere could be avoided.”

Here we have a specific reference to the magicians (μαγικῆς) in Egypt as in Exodus, chapters 7-9. These magicians were humbled. They had promised to drive away the fears and ills of the Egyptians, who remain unnamed here. These magicians were sick with a ridiculous fear themselves. They were afraid of the wild animals and the serpents. They perished in their own fear. Once again we have an embellishing of the original story to add a more dramatic effect.