The defeat of the Egyptian Pharaoh Neco (Jer 46:2-46:2)

“Concerning Egypt.

The army of Pharaoh Neco,

King of Egypt,

Was by the Euphrates River,

At Carchemish.

King Nebuchadnezzar,

Of Babylon

Defeated him

In the fourth year

Of King Jehoiakim,

The son of Josiah,

King of Judah.”

King Neco II ruled Egypt from 610-595 BCE. He had a huge impact on Judah because he had killed King Josiah (640-609 BCE) in 609 BCE at Megiddo. King Josiah of Judah was on the Babylonian side of this war against the Egyptians. King Neco then replaced the son of King Josiah, King Jehoahaz or King Shallum of Judah, with his brother King Jehoiakim or King Eliakim (609-598 BCE). King Jehoahaz (609 BCE) was brought back to Egypt, while his brother ruled in Judah. The incident mentioned here took place 4 years later in 605 BCE, in the 4th year of the reign of King Jehoiakim at Carchemish, on the Euphrates River. This is where King Nebuchadnezzar of Babylon defeated King Neco of Egypt.

The tragic end to King Josiah (2 Chr 35:23-35:27)

“The archers shot King Josiah. The king said to his servants. ‘Take me away, for I am badly wounded.’ So his servants took him out of the chariot. They carried him in his second chariot. They brought him to Jerusalem. There he died. He was buried in the tombs of his ancestors. All Judah and Jerusalem mourned for King Josiah. Jeremiah also uttered a lament for Josiah. All the singing men and singing women have spoken of King Josiah in their laments to this day. They made these a custom in Israel. They are recorded in the Laments. Now the rest of the acts of King Josiah, and his faithful deeds in accordance with what is written in the law of Yahweh, and his acts, first and last, are written in the Book of the Kings of Israel and Judah.”

At the battle of Megiddo with the Assyrians, King Josiah was killed. He was shot with arrows. They transferred him back to Jerusalem, where he was buried with his ancestors. Here the prophet Jeremiah, who was not mentioned in the books of Kings, entered with a lament. The Temple singers spoke about him so that it has been written down. Once again for more information about King Josiah, you can check out the lost “Book of the Kings of Israel and Judah,” not just the Annals of the Kings of Judah. So ends the tale of the good King Josiah.

 

The battle with King Neco of Egypt (2 Chr 35:20-35:22)

“After all this, when King Josiah had set the temple in order, King Neco of Egypt went up to fight at Carchemish on the Euphrates. King Josiah went out against him. However, King Neco sent envoys to him, saying. ‘What have I to do with you, king of Judah? I am not coming against you today, but against the house with which I am at war. God has commanded me to hurry. Cease opposing God, who is with me, so that he will not destroy you.’ Nevertheless King Josiah would not turn away from him, but disguised himself in order to fight with him. He did not listen to the words of King Neco from the mouth of God, but joined battle in the plain of Megiddo.”

This is an expansion of 2 Kings, chapter 23. Apparently, there was a fight with Egypt as King Neco met King Josiah at Megiddo, in the upper Manasseh territory. King Neco of Egypt was probably King Nekau II (610-594 BCE). As the Assyrian empire was falling apart he took a lot of land from Assyria. He had a battle at Megiddo with the Assyrians and King Josiah. He warned King Josiah that he did not care about him, only the Assyrians. He said that God had sent him to fight them, not the people of Judah. King Josiah, for some reason, wanted to fight with King Neco anyway.

 

The territory of Ephraim (1 Chr 7:28-7:29)

“The possessions and settlements of Ephraim were Bethel and its towns, eastward to Naaran, and westward to Gezer and its towns, Shechem and its towns, and Ayyah and its towns. They also lived along the borders of the Manassites, Beth-shean and its towns, Taanach and its towns, Megiddo and its towns, Dor and its towns. In these towns lived the sons of Joseph the son of Israel.”

According to Joshua, chapter 16, the allotment for the Ephraimites went from the Jordan River by Jericho, into the hill country to Bethel. Then it went from Bethel to Luz, then to the territory of Lower Beth-horon, to Gezer, Shechem, and Ayyah and ended at the sea. Bethel and Shechem played a major role in the kingdom of Israel as each was mentioned over 60 times. The tribe of Ephraim had the southern part of the allotment for the tribe of Joseph. The Ephraimites had the towns of Beth-shean, Taanach, Megiddo, and Dor, mentioned around 10 times each. Naaran and Ayyah were towns that only appear here. Benjamin and Dan were squeezed into the territory between Ephraim and Judah.   Somehow some of the towns of Manasseh were to be given to the Ephraimites. There were Canaanites living in Gezer, but they were slaves.

The death of King Josiah (2 Kings 23:28-23:30)

“Now the rest of the acts of King Josiah, and all that he did, are they not written in the Book of the Annals of the Kings of Judah? In his days Pharaoh Neco king of Egypt went up to the king of Assyria to the Euphrates River. King Josiah went to meet him. But when Pharaoh Neco saw him at Megiddo, he killed him. His servants carried him dead in a chariot from Megiddo. They brought him to Jerusalem. They buried him in his own tomb. The people of the land took Jehoahaz son of King Josiah, anointed him, and made him king in place of his father.”

Once again for more information about King Josiah, you can check out the lost “Book of the Annals. Apparently, there was fight with Egypt as King Neco met King Josiah at Megiddo, in the upper Manasseh territory and killed him there. King Neco of Egypt was probably King Nekau II (610-594 BCE). As the Assyrian empire was falling apart he took a lot of land from Assyria. He had a battle at Megiddo with the Assyrians and King Josiah, where Josiah was killed. It seems that Judah and King Josiah sided with the Assyrians. They took his body back to Jerusalem and buried it in a separate tomb. Then his son King Jehoahaz took over as the king of Judah.