Eliphaz explains who the happy man is (Job 5:17-5:27)

“How happy is the one whom God reproves.

Therefore, do not despise the discipline of the Almighty Shaddai!

He wounds,

But he binds up.

He strikes,

But his hands heal.

He will deliver you from six troubles.

In seven no harm shall touch you.

In famine he will redeem you from death,

In war he will redeem you from the power of the sword.

You shall be hidden from the scourge of the tongue.

You shall not fear destruction when it comes.

At destruction and famine you shall laugh.

You shall not fear the wild animals of the earth.

You shall be in league with the stones of the field.

The wild animals shall be at peace with you.

You shall know that your tent is safe,

You shall inspect your fold and miss nothing.

You shall know that your descendants will be many.

Your offspring will be like the grass of the earth.

You shall come to your grave in ripe old age,

As a shock of grain comes up to the threshing floor in its season.

See!

We have searched this out.

It is true.

Hear!

Know it for yourself.”

Eliphaz explained that Job should be happy that he is being disciplined by God, the almighty Shaddai, the name of the God of Abraham in Genesis, chapter 17. God wounds and strikes, but he also heals. He also delivers people from troubles 6 or 7 times. Once again we have the lucky unlucky number of 7. He will protect people during a famine or war so that they will laugh at them. He will protect the disciplined ones from wild animals. He will make sure that their tents and flocks are in good shape. Their offspring will be like the grass on the earth. They will live to a ripe old age. Eliphaz has searched this out. He knows that it is true and he wants Job to know this himself.

The invitation of General Holofernes (Jdt 12:10-12:11)

“On the fourth day, General Holofernes held a banquet for his personal attendants only. He did not invite any of his officers. He said to Bagoas, the eunuch, who had charge of his personal affairs.

‘Go and persuade the Hebrew woman.

As she is in your care

To join us

To eat

And to drink with us.

It would be a disgrace

If we let such a woman go,

Without having intercourse with her.

If we do not seduce her,

She will laugh at us.’”

The plan of General Holofernes was very clear. He was having a banquet with only his own personal attendants and no officers. Bagoas, who was the eunuch in charge of the general’s personal affairs, was to invite Judith and persuade her to come to the banquet. Apparently there was a real Persian eunuch named Bagoas, who lived in the 4th century BCE, about 200 years after the supposed setting of this story. Eunuchs were men who were castrated or sometimes just impotent or celibate. They were not interested in sex or marriage so that leaders felt safe having them take care of their personal matters for them, particularly their women. General Holofernes felt it would be a disgrace to him if he did not have sex with Judith before she left camp. If he did not seduce her, she would probably laugh at him.