Even sinners do some good (Lk 6:33-6:33)

“If you do good

To those who do good

To you,

What credit is that

To you?

Even sinners

Do the same.”

 

καὶ γὰρ ἐὰν ἀγαθοποιῆτε τοὺς ἀγαθοποιοῦντας ὑμᾶς, ποία ὑμῖν χάρις ἐστίν; καὶ οἱ ἁμαρτωλοὶ τὸ αὐτὸ ποιοῦσιν.

 

Luke had Jesus continue in the same vain.  If they did good (καὶ γὰρ ἐὰν ἀγαθοποιῆτε) to those who did good to them (τοὺς ἀγαθοποιοῦντας ὑμᾶς), what credit or gift was that to them (ποία ὑμῖν χάρις ἐστίν)?  Even sinners did the same (καὶ οἱ ἁμαρτωλοὶ τὸ αὐτὸ ποιοῦσιν).  Matthew, chapter 5:44, has something similar to this, but Matthew was more forceful there.  Matthew indicated that Jesus told them to do good to those who were spitefully accusing them, hating them, and persecuting them.  These early Christians were asked to be generous to their enemies and persecutors.  Maybe later Christians might learn a little bit from the early followers of Jesus.

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Baptism with the Holy Spirit (Lk 3:16-3:16)

“He will baptize you

With the Holy Spirit

And fire.”

 

αὐτὸς ὑμᾶς βαπτίσει ἐν Πνεύματι Ἁγίῳ καὶ πυρί

 

This is similar to Matthew, chapter 3:11, Mark, chapter 1:8, and John, chapter 1:33.  Luke indicated that John said that this mightier one to come was going to baptize them with the Holy Spirit (αὐτὸς ὑμᾶς βαπτίσει ἐν Πνεύματι Ἁγίῳ) and fire (καὶ πυρί).  Matthew and Luke, mentioned fire with the Holy Spirit, but Mark did not.  The role of the Holy Spirit seemed important because he was going to use purifying fire in the baptismal washing.  There was a clear difference between the baptism of John with water for repentance and that of the later Christians with or in the Holy Spirit.  Perhaps there was some doubt among the early followers of Jesus about the role of baptism.

The baptism of water and the Holy Spirit (Mk 1:8-1:8)

“I have baptized you

With water.

But he will baptize you

With the Holy Spirit.”

 

ἐγὼ ἐβάπτισα ὑμᾶς ὕδατι, αὐτὸς δὲ βαπτίσει ὑμᾶς Πνεύματι Ἁγίῳ.

 

Mark and Matthew, chapter 3:11, are very similar in their description of John the Baptist speaking about baptism.  Mark said that John proclaimed that he was baptizing them with water (ἐγὼ ἐβάπτισα ὑμᾶς ὕδατι).  However, the one to come would baptize them (αὐτὸς δὲ βαπτίσει ὑμᾶς) with or in the Holy Spirit (Πνεύματι Ἁγίῳ).  Matthew added that the one to come would baptize with the Holy Spirit and fire (πυρί).  Even though there is no mention of fire here in Mark, Luke, chapter 3:16, said that the one to come would baptize with the Holy Spirit and fire also.  The role of the Holy Spirit seemed important.  There was a clear difference between the baptism of John and that of the later Christians with or in the Holy Spirit, as if there was some doubt among the earlier followers of Jesus.

The woman poured oil on Jesus (Mt 26:7-26:7)

“A woman

Came to Jesus

With an alabaster jar

Of very expensive ointment.

She poured it

On his head,

As he was reclining

At the table.”

 

προσῆλθεν αὐτῷ γυνὴ ἔχουσα ἀλάβαστρον μύρου βαρυτίμου καὶ κατέχεεν ἐπὶ τῆς κεφαλῆς αὐτοῦ ἀνακειμένου.

 

This is very similar to Mark, chapter 14:3, and somewhat similar to John, chapter 12:3, where the woman was identified as Mary, the sister of Lazarus.  She poured the nard oil on his feet and wiped it with her hair, not on his head as here and in Mark.  In Luke, chapter 7:38, while Jesus was at the house of a Pharisee, this woman also brought an alabaster jar to anoint the feet of Jesus.  Matthew said that an unnamed woman came or approached Jesus (προσῆλθεν αὐτῷ γυνὴ) with an alabaster jar full of very expensive ointment (ἔχουσα ἀλάβαστρον μύρου βαρυτίμου).  This was anointing oil or as later Christians would call it holy oil, “Myron (μύρου).”  She then poured it on his head (καὶ κατέχεεν ἐπὶ τῆς κεφαλῆς), as he was reclining at the table (αὐτοῦ ἀνακειμένου).  This may appear a little unusual, but this oil might be a foretaste of the prophetic, royal, or priestly anointing of Jesus as prophet, king, and priest.  In the Old Testament stories, kings were anointed on the head.