Egypt was more culpable than Sodom (Wis 19:13-19:17)

“The punishments did not come upon the sinners

Without prior signs

With the violence of thunder.

They justly suffered

Because of their wicked acts.

They practiced a more bitter hatred of strangers.

Others had refused to receive strangers

When they came to them.

But these made slaves of guests

Who were their benefactors.

Not only so,

While punishment of some sort

Will come upon the former

For having received strangers with hostility,

The latter,

Having first received them with festal celebrations,

Afterward afflicted them with terrible sufferings.

They had already shared the same rights.

They were stricken also with loss of sight.

Just as were those at the door of the righteous man.

When surrounded by yawning darkness,

Each tried to find the way through their own door.”

Who was worse, the Egyptians or the Sodomites from Genesis, chapters 18-19? Did the Egyptians deserve to be punished? The decision rested on how they treated strangers. Interesting enough, the argument is not about immorality but about hospitality. There is no explicit mention of Sodom or Egypt, but the implications are clear. These Egyptians were clearly warned with the various plagues. Instead of refusing strangers, the Egyptians had welcomed the Israelites, especially based on the stories about Joseph in Genesis, chapters 37-47. There his whole family, father and brothers, the sons of Jacob were welcomed into Egypt. However, as pointed out at the beginning of Exodus, chapters 1 and 5, they then enslaved them and tried to kill the Israelite male babies. Unlike the Sodomites they were not blind, but simply lived in darkness. This story about blindness is clearly from the Sodomite story in Genesis.

Tobit warns against marriage with strangers (Tob 4:12-4:13)

“Beware, my son, of every kind of fornication.

First of all,

Marry a woman from among the descendants of your ancestors.

Do not marry a foreign woman,

Who is not of your father’s tribe.

We are the descendents of the prophets.

Remember, my son,

That Noah, Abraham, Isaac, and Jacob,

Our ancestors of old,

All took wives from among their kindred.

They were blessed in their children.

Their posterity will inherit the land.

So now, my son,

Love your kindred.

In your heart do not disdain your kindred,

The sons and daughters of your people,

By refusing to take a wife for yourself from among them.'”

Tobit warns his son against immorality and fornication. This is like a sex talk. He was not to marry a foreign women but someone from his descendents, someone from the tribe. This was and is fairly common, even today, where ethnic groups want their children to intermarry within the same ethnic group, not perceived foreigners. They were the descendents of prophets, people who had direct contact with God.   The ideal was Noah, Abraham, Isaac, and Jacob. Noah has been added to the list here since normally it would be Abraham, Isaac, and Israel or Jacob. If he married among his own people, Tobias would be blessed with children and land. He was not to forget his family. Refusing to marry with another from his tribe, he would show disdain for his wider family.