“Then I acknowledged my sin to you.

I did not hide my iniquity.

I said.

‘I will confess my transgressions to Yahweh.’

Then you forgave the guilt of my sin.

Selah”

Once David acknowledged his sins he had no more problems. He did not hide his iniquity. He confessed his transgressions to Yahweh. Then Yahweh forgave him the guilt of his sins. Once again, there is a pause for a musical interlude with the Selah. There will be a lot of pauses or interludes in this psalm of wisdom.

Distress and sin (Ps 25:15-25:18)

Ain     

“My eyes are ever toward Yahweh.

He will pluck my feet out of the net.

Phe     

Turn to me!

Be gracious to me!

I am lonely and afflicted.

Cade   

Relieve the troubles of my heart!

Bring me out of my distress!

Qoph  

Consider my affliction!

Consider my trouble!

Forgive all my sins!”

The psalmist or David puts this on a very personal note. His eyes are on Yahweh because he knew that Yahweh would get his feet out of any net. He wanted Yahweh to turn to him and be gracious. He was lonely and afflicted. He wanted the troubles of his heart brought to an end. He wanted to get out of his distress and afflictions. The only way was for Yahweh to forgive him his sins.

Job speaks about Sheol (Job 14:13-14:17)

“O that you would hide me in Sheol!

O that you would conceal me until your wrath is past!

O that you would appoint me a set time!

O that you would remember me!

If mortals die,

Will they live again?

All the days of my service

I would wait until my release should come.

You would call me.

I would answer you.

You would long for the work of your hands.

Then you would not number my steps.

You would not keep watch over my sin.

My transgression would be sealed up in a bag.

You would cover over my iniquity.”

Job wanted to hide in Sheol, or the underworld of the dead, what we often call hell. He wanted to stay there until the wrath of God against him had subsided. He wanted a set time. He wanted to know if mortals lived after their death. Job was willing to wait in Sheol if he had a release date. He would answer if called. He wanted God to remember that he was the work of God. He wanted him to remember his steps. He wanted his sins and transgressions covered up in a sealed bag. He wanted Sheol or hell to be transitory, not permanent.

Job complains to God (Job 10:1-10:7)

“I loathe my life.

I will give free utterance to my complaint.

I will speak in the bitterness of my soul.

I will say to God.

‘Do not condemn me.

Let me know why you contend against me.

Does it seem good to you to oppress?

Does it seem good to you to despise the work of your hands?

Does it seem good to you to favor the schemes of the wicked?

Do you have eyes of flesh?

Do you see as humans sees?

Are your days like the days of mortals?

Are your years like human years?

Do you seek out my iniquity?

Do you search for my sin?

You know that I am not guilty.

There is no one to deliver me out of your hand?’”

Once again, the depressed Job hated his life. He was going to complain from the bitterness of his soul. He did not want to be condemned. He wanted to know why God was against him. Why was he favoring the schemes of the wicked? Did not God have eyes to see? His days and years are not like humans. He could look into his heart since he knows all things. He knew his sins and iniquities, but who would deliver him from the hand of God?