Thanks to God (Sir 51:1-51:1)

“I give you thanks!

O Lord!

O king!

I will praise you!

O God!

My Savior!

I give thanks

To your name!”

This work has a couple of appendices about giving thanks to God and the importance of wisdom. This was as if to envelop these sometimes mundane comments of Sirach within a more religious context. This author wants to give thanks to the Lord who is his king. He wants to praise God who is his savior. He wants to give thanks to his name, the unnamed Yahweh.

David wants Yahweh to fight on his side (Ps 35:1-35:3)

A psalm of David

Contend!

Yahweh!

With those who contend with me!

Fight against those

Who fight against me!

Take hold of shield and buckler!

Rise up to help me!

Draw the spear and the javelin

Against my pursuers!

Say to my soul.

‘I am your deliverance!’”

Once again, Psalm 35 is a lamentation asking for help, much like Psalm 22 and 31. There are no indications of any incident in the life of David, but there is only the simple reference to David in the title. David wanted Yahweh to fight on his side against his pursuers. He wanted Yahweh to protect him with a shield, a buckler, a spear, and a javelin. This was no pure spiritual aid. David wanted military aid. He wanted Yahweh to be his deliverer and his savior in the times of battle.

Yahweh gives strength of David (Ps 18:1-18:3)

To the choirmaster leader, a psalm of David, the servant of Yahweh, who addressed the words of this song to Yahweh on the day when Yahweh delivered him from the hand of all his enemies, and from the hand of Saul.

He said.

‘I love you!

Yahweh!

My strength!

Yahweh is my rock.

Yahweh is my fortress.

Yahweh is my deliverer.

My God!

My rock!

I take refuge in God.

Yahweh is my shield.

Yahweh is the horn of my salvation.

Yahweh is my stronghold.

I call upon Yahweh.

He is worthy to be praised.

I shall be saved from my enemies.’”

Psalm 18 is a very long psalm with a long introduction. It portrays the final victory of David against all his enemies, especially Saul. This is almost identical to the canticle or song of David in 2 Samuel, chapter 22. Thus it is a royal psalm of thanksgiving. These first few phrases, including the introduction, are almost word for word from 2 Samuel. What a beautiful introduction. He loved Yahweh. Yahweh, his God, was his strength, his rock, and his fortress in whom he took refuge. God was his shield, his horn, his stronghold, and his savior. David was saved from his enemies. Surely Yahweh was worthy to be praised.