Prayer to Yahweh (Hab 1:12-1:13)

“Are you not from of old?

O Yahweh!

My God!

My Holy One!

You shall not die!

O Yahweh!

You have marked them

For judgment.

You!

O Rock!

Have you established them

For punishment?

Your eyes are too pure

To behold evil!

You cannot look

On wrongdoing!

Why do you look

On the treacherous ones?

Why are you silent

When the wicked swallow

Those more righteous

Than they?”

Habakkuk has a prayer to Yahweh that seems to question some of his behavior.  Yahweh, the holy one, his God, who would not die, has marked all these violent men for judgment.  Yahweh, his rock, has set them up for punishment.  Yahweh’s eyes were too pure to see evil, so that he could not look at any wrongdoing.  Then Habakkuk wanted to know why Yahweh was so silent about these treacherous ones, when these wicked ones seem to be swallowing up the righteous ones?  Habakkuk wanted Yahweh to act against these wicked people now, not tolerate them for a later punishment.

Trust in God (Ps 62:5-62:8)

“For God alone

My soul waits in silence.

My hope is from God.

He alone is my rock.

He alone is my salvation.

He alone is my fortress.

I shall not be shaken.

On God rests my deliverance.

On God rests my honor.

My mighty rock is God.

My refuge is God.

Trust in God

At all times!

O people!

Pour out your heart before him!

God is a refuge for us!”

Selah

These first few verses repeat the first few verses of this psalm. David placed all his trust in God alone. He waited in silence. He knew that God was his salvation, his rock, and his fortress. He would not be shaken in his ways. God gave him deliverance and honor. God was his mighty rock and refuge. He wanted all the people to trust in God at all times. He wanted them to pour out their hearts to God because he was the refuge for all of them. This section concluded with a musical interlude meditative pause, the Selah.

Hope in God alone (Ps 62:1-62:2)

To the choirmaster leader, according to Jeduthun, a psalm of David

“For God alone

My soul waits in silence.

From God

Comes my salvation.

He alone is my rock.

He alone is my salvation.

He alone is my fortress.

I shall never be shaken.”

Psalm 62 is another choral psalm of David. However the melody is to Jeduthun, who was mentioned in Psalm 39 and 77. Jeduthun was the name of one of the Levite Merari families that David appointed as music master in 1 Chronicles, chapters 16 and 25. He was a trumpet player and his sons led the music in the Temple. David placed all his trust in God alone. He waited in silence. He knew that God was his salvation, his rock, and his fortress. He would not be shaken in his ways.

God is my rock (Ps 42:9-42:10)

“I say to God.

‘You are my rock.

Why have you forgotten me?

Why must I walk around mournfully?

Why does the enemy oppress me?’

With a deadly wound in my body,

My adversaries taunt me.

They say to me continually.

‘Where is your God?’”

The psalmist said to God that he was his rock. Yet at the same time, he wanted to know why he was forgotten. Why was he in mourning? Why did his enemy oppress him? Why did he have a deadly wound? Why were his adversaries continually taunting him, asking him where his God was? This does not sound like a happy man, but someone upset at his rock that was not doing more for him.

Yahweh is my rock (Ps 31:1-31:5)

“To the choirmaster leader, a psalm of David.

In you!

Yahweh!

I seek refuge!

Do not let me ever be put to shame!

In your righteousness

Deliver me!

Incline your ear to me!

Rescue me speedily!

Be a rock of refuge for me!

Be a strong fortress to save me!

You are indeed my rock!

You are indeed my fortress!

For your name’s sake

Lead me!

Guide me!

Take me out of the net

That is hidden for me!

You are my refuge!

Into your hand

I commit my spirit!

You have redeemed me!

Yahweh!

Faithful God!”

Once again, Psalm 31 is a lamenting fairly long psalm for deliverance from the personal enemies of David. There was the usual indication of a choir master leader. David sought refuge in Yahweh. He did not want to be put to shame. He wanted to be delivered quickly from his enemies. He wanted Yahweh to listen to him. His refuge was Yahweh because Yahweh was his rock and fortress. He wanted to be guided by Yahweh so that no net would catch his feet. He committed his heart to the hand of Yahweh, who had redeemed him as his faithful God.

Yahweh is my rock (Ps 28:1-28:2)

A psalm of David.

To you!

Yahweh,

I call!

My rock!

Be not deaf to me!

If you are silent to me,

I shall be like those who go down to the pit.

Hear the voice of my supplication!

I cry to you for help!

I lift up my hands

Toward your most holy sanctuary.”

Once again, this short Psalm 28, a psalm of David, continues the concept of deliverance from enemies just as the preceding psalms had done. David wanted Yahweh to listen to his cries. Yahweh was his rock. If he did not hear anything he would go down to the pit, the graveyard or the underground death of Sheol. Not only was he crying out, he was lifting up his hands towards the holy sanctuary, the Temple of Yahweh.

Yahweh gives strength of David (Ps 18:1-18:3)

To the choirmaster leader, a psalm of David, the servant of Yahweh, who addressed the words of this song to Yahweh on the day when Yahweh delivered him from the hand of all his enemies, and from the hand of Saul.

He said.

‘I love you!

Yahweh!

My strength!

Yahweh is my rock.

Yahweh is my fortress.

Yahweh is my deliverer.

My God!

My rock!

I take refuge in God.

Yahweh is my shield.

Yahweh is the horn of my salvation.

Yahweh is my stronghold.

I call upon Yahweh.

He is worthy to be praised.

I shall be saved from my enemies.’”

Psalm 18 is a very long psalm with a long introduction. It portrays the final victory of David against all his enemies, especially Saul. This is almost identical to the canticle or song of David in 2 Samuel, chapter 22. Thus it is a royal psalm of thanksgiving. These first few phrases, including the introduction, are almost word for word from 2 Samuel. What a beautiful introduction. He loved Yahweh. Yahweh, his God, was his strength, his rock, and his fortress in whom he took refuge. God was his shield, his horn, his stronghold, and his savior. David was saved from his enemies. Surely Yahweh was worthy to be praised.