The crowd wants to crucify Jesus (Mt 27:21-27:23)

“The governor again

Said to them.

‘Which of the two men

Do you want me

To release

To you?’

They said.

‘Barabbas.’

Pilate said to them.

Then what shall I do

With Jesus

Who is called Christ,

The Messiah?’

All of them said.

‘Let him be crucified.’

He asked.

‘Why?

What evil has he done?’

But they shouted

All the more.

‘Let him be crucified.’”

 

ἀποκριθεὶς δὲ ὁ ἡγεμὼν εἶπεν αὐτοῖς Τίνα θέλετε ἀπὸ τῶν δύο ἀπολύσω ὑμῖν; οἱ δὲ εἶπαν Τὸν Βαραββᾶν.

λέγει αὐτοῖς ὁ Πειλᾶτος Τί οὖν ποιήσω Ἰησοῦν τὸν λεγόμενον Χριστόν; λέγουσιν πάντες Σταυρωθήτω

ὁ δὲ ἔφη Τί γὰρ κακὸν ἐποίησεν; οἱ δὲ περισσῶς ἔκραζον λέγοντες Σταυρωθήτω.

 

Something similar to this dialogue between Pilate and the crowd can be found in Mark, chapter 15:12-14.  In Luke, chapter 23:18-23, there is a longer dialogue, while in John, chapter 18:40, there is only a short statement about Barabbas.  Matthew said that the governor again asked the crowd (ἀποκριθεὶς δὲ ὁ ἡγεμὼν εἶπεν αὐτοῖς) which of the two men did they want him to release (Τίνα θέλετε ἀπὸ τῶν δύο ἀπολύσω ὑμῖν).  The crowd responded ‘Barabbas’ (οἱ δὲ εἶπαν Τὸν Βαραββᾶν).  Pilate then asked them (λέγει αὐτοῖς ὁ Πειλᾶτος) what should he do with Jesus (Τί οὖν ποιήσω Ἰησοῦν), the one called the Christ (τὸν λεγόμενον Χριστόν), the Messiah.  All of them responded that he should be crucified (λέγουσιν πάντες Σταυρωθήτω).  Then Pilate asked them what evil or bad thing had he done (ὁ δὲ ἔφη Τί γὰρ κακὸν ἐποίησεν)?  But they shouted all the more loudly (οἱ δὲ περισσῶς ἔκραζον) that he was to be crucified (λέγοντες Σταυρωθήτω).  The crowd that had loved Jesus for all his miracles and preaching now wanted him dead as they turned on him.

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Intellectual attacks on the Bible

Until the 18th century, there never was any question about the historical validity of the Bible.  Both Protestants and Catholics took it for granted that whatever the Bible said happened, actually happened.  The only dispute was as to the meaning and significance of the stories.  A new historical skepticism from the French Enlightenment and the German Rationalism began to question whether the events as described in the Bible ever took place.  First there were questions about events in the Old Testament, about Adam and Eve, Abraham, and Moses.  Then in the 19th century, the problem of Jesus and his miracles came into question.

Introductory hymn to Yahweh (Ps 105:1-105:5)

“O give thanks to Yahweh!

Call on his name!

Make known his deeds among the peoples!

Sing to him!

Sing praises to him!

Tell of all his wonderful works!

Glory in his holy name!

Let the hearts of those who seek Yahweh rejoice!

Seek Yahweh!

Seek his strength!

Seek his presence continually!

Remember the wonderful works he has done!

Remember his miracles!

Remember the judgments he has uttered!”

Psalm 105 is usually combined with Psalm 106 to be recited at some major feast, since it recalls all the great events in the life of the Israelites. However this long psalm has no introductory title. The first section is a hymn to Yahweh. Some of the texts have an Alleluia to start this hymn. We give thanks to Yahweh. We call on his name. We tell everybody about him. We sing praises to him. We glory in his holy name. Those who seek Yahweh can rejoice. We seek his strength and his presence continually. We remember his wonderful works, his miracles, and his judgments.