The lepers at the time of Elisha (Lk 4:27-4:27)

“There were also many lepers

In Israel

At the time

Of the prophet Elisha.

None of them

Was cleansed,

Except Naaman,

The Syrian.”

 

καὶ πολλοὶ λεπροὶ ἦσαν ἐν τῷ Ἰσραὴλ ἐπὶ Ἑλισαίου τοῦ προφήτου, καὶ οὐδεὶς αὐτῶν ἐκαθαρίσθη εἰ μὴ Ναιμὰν ὁ Σύρος.

 

Luke then cited another unique story about the prophet Elisha, the prophet who followed Elijah in the 9th century BCE.  He too was well known for his exploits in the first 13 chapters of 2 Kings.  This episode was about Naaman, the commander of the Aramean army, who suffered from some kind of leprosy.  Naaman asked his king if he could go get a cure from a prophet he had heard about.  Elisha told the king to send Naaman to him so that he could cure him.  He told Naaman to wash himself 7 times in the Jordan River.  This made Naaman very upset.  Finally, he went and immersed himself 7 times in the Jordan River.  Thus, he was cured of his leprosy, as found in 2 Kings, 5:1-14.  Luke said that there were also many lepers (καὶ πολλοὶ λεπροὶ ἦσαν) in Israel (ἐν τῷ Ἰσραὴλ) at the time of the prophet Elisha (ἐπὶ Ἑλισαίου τοῦ προφήτου).  None of them were cleansed (καὶ οὐδεὶς αὐτῶν ἐκαθαρίσθη), except Naaman, the Syrian (εἰ μὴ Ναιμὰν ὁ Σύρος).  Syrian and Aramean are almost the same.  The key idea was that someone other than an Israelite was cured.

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Ishmael kills Gedaliah at Mizpah (Jer 41:2-41:3)

“Ishmael,

The son of Nethaniah,

With his ten men

Got up.

They struck down

Governor Gedaliah,

The son of Ahikam,

The son of Shaphan,

With the sword.

They killed him.

Because the king of Babylon

Had appointed him

Governor in the land.

Ishmael also killed

All the Judeans

Who were with

Governor Gedaliah

At Mizpah.

They also killed

The Chaldean soldiers

Who happened to be there.”

This is similar to 2 Kings, chapter 25. As they were eating, Ishmael rose up against Governor Gedaliah and killed him with a sword. Ishmael was mad, either because he was passed over by not being named governor or at the Babylonians for taking his king, King Zedekiah. Either way, he and his 10 men killed everyone that was with Governor Gedaliah at Mizpah, both all the Judeans and the Chaldean soldiers who happened to be there.

Ishmael goes to Mizpah (Jer 41:1-41:1)

“In the seventh month,

Ishmael,

The son of Nethaniah,

The son of Elishama,

Of the royal family,

One of the chief officers

Of the king,

Came with ten men

To Gedaliah,

The son of Ahikam,

At Mizpah.

They ate bread together

There at Mizpah.”

Next Ishmael, the son of Nethaniah and grandson of Elishama, who was a royal family member, came to Mizpah in the seventh month that may have been the feast of Tents. Ishmael was an officer of the king also. He came with 10 men to greet Governor Gedaliah. They even ate a meal together at Mizpah. Thus this seems like everything was okay. Ishmael was mad either because he was passed over by not being named governor or he was mad at the Babylonians for taking his king, King Zedekiah.

Thanks to God (Sir 51:1-51:1)

“I give you thanks!

O Lord!

O king!

I will praise you!

O God!

My Savior!

I give thanks

To your name!”

This work has a couple of appendices about giving thanks to God and the importance of wisdom. This was as if to envelop these sometimes mundane comments of Sirach within a more religious context. This author wants to give thanks to the Lord who is his king. He wants to praise God who is his savior. He wants to give thanks to his name, the unnamed Yahweh.

Yahweh is great (Ps 145:1-145:3)

A song of praise of David

Aleph

“I will extol you!

My God!

My king!

Bless your name forever and ever!

Bet

Every day,

I will bless you!

I will praise your name forever and ever!

Gimel

Great is Yahweh!

He is greatly to be praised.

His greatness is unsearchable!”

Psalm 145 is an acrostic or Hebrew alphabet praise psalm of David about the God of Israel. David would extol God as his king. He would bless his name forever. Every day he blessed and praised his name. Yahweh was great with an unsearchable greatness. The first 3 letters of the Hebrew alphabet are found here in italic.