The women depart from the tomb (Mt 28:8-28:8)

“Thus,

They left the tomb

Quickly

With fear

And great joy.

They ran

To tell

His disciples.”

 

καὶ ἀπελθοῦσαι ταχὺ ἀπὸ τοῦ μνημείου μετὰ φόβου καὶ χαρᾶς μεγάλης ἔδραμον ἀπαγγεῖλαι τοῖς μαθηταῖς αὐτοῦ.

 

This text is similar to Mark, chapter 16:8-10, but there the whole question of the short and long ending of Mark comes up.  In verse 8, the scared women do not tell anyone, then in verse 9, they told Peter and his friends, and then in verse 10, Mary Magdalene told those who had been mourning his death.  Luke, chapter 24:10, had Mary Magdalene, Joanna, Mary, the mother of James, and the other women tell the apostles about the resurrection.  John, chapter 20:2, had only Mary Magdalene tell Peter and the other beloved disciple about Jesus’ resurrection.  Clearly Mary Magdalene was involved in these incidents at the tomb.  Here Matthew said that these women, Mary Magdalene and the other Mary, left the tomb quickly (καὶ ἀπελθοῦσαι ταχὺ ἀπὸ τοῦ μνημείου) with both fear and grace or great joy (μετὰ φόβου καὶ χαρᾶς μεγάλης).  They ran to tell the disciples of Jesus what had happened to him (ἔδραμον ἀπαγγεῖλαι τοῖς μαθηταῖς αὐτοῦ).  Thus, the resurrection of Jesus became common knowledge to the male disciples of Jesus via these women, Mary Magdalene in particular.

 

The southern campaign in Palestine (Dan 11:22-11:24)

“Armies

Shall be utterly swept away

Before him.

They shall be broken

Before him.

This includes

The prince of the covenant as well.

After an alliance is made

With him,

He shall act deceitfully.

He shall become strong

With a small party.

Without warning,

He shall come

Into the richest parts

Of the province.

He shall do

What none of his predecessors

Had ever done.

He shall lavish

Plunder,

Spoil,

Wealth,

On them.

He shall devise plans

Against strongholds,

But only for a time.”

This king of the north from Syria and Babylon, King Antiochus IV, would go south to Judea or Palestine. He would take his armies and go against the prince of the covenant, probably the Jerusalem high priest, Onias III. He was going to act deceitfully and become strong with a small party of his own. He even was going to attack the rich areas of Israel to plunder, spoil, and give wealth to his friends, something his predecessors had never done. He even would temporarily make plans against the various strongholds.

The call for mercy (Dan 3:10-3:13)

“Now your servants!

We cannot

Open our mouths!

We cannot

Worship you!

We have become

A shame!

We have become

A reproach!

For your name’s sake,

Do not give us up forever!

Do not annul your covenant!

Do not withdraw

Your mercy

From us!

For the sake of Abraham,

Your beloved,

For the sake of Isaac,

Your servant,

For the sake of Israel,

Your holy one,

Do not withdraw

Your mercy!

You promised

To multiply their descendants

Like the stars of heaven,

Like the sand on the shore

Of the sea.”

Azariah made a plea to God to have mercy on him and his friends. They were not able to open their mouths to worship God. They had become a shame and a reproach for the sake of God’s name. He wanted God not to give up on them or annul the covenant that he had made with Israel. He did not want God to withdraw his mercy from them. He reminded God about Abraham, the beloved one, Isaac, his servant, and Israel, the holy one. God had promised to multiply their descendants, like the stars in heaven or like the sand on the sea shore.

 

The response of the palace master (Dan 1:10-1:10)

“The palace master

Said to Daniel.

‘I am afraid

Of my lord,

The king.

He has appointed

Your food,

As well as your drink.

If he should see you

In poorer conditions

Than the other young men

Of your own age,

You would endanger

My head

With the king.’”

The palace master responded to Daniel. The king had decided what food and drink that they should have. If they did not eat and drink these items, then he, the palace master, would be in trouble with his boss, the king, especially if Daniel and his friends were in worse shape than the other young men. This would place the palace master in trouble with the king, and might even lead to his death.

Orphans and widows (Lam 5:3-5:4)

“We have become

Orphans!

We are fatherless!

Our mothers are

Like widows!

We must pay

For the water

We drink!

The wood

We get

Must be bought.”

Assuming the first person plural, this author laments the situation of him and his friends left in Jerusalem. They have become orphans, without fathers. Their mothers have become widows. They have to pay for the water and the wood for their existence. Life is tough.

The enemies (Lam 3:46-3:48)

Phe

“All our enemies

Have opened

Their mouths

Against us.

Panic has come

Upon us.

Pitfall has come

Upon us.

There is devastation.

There is destruction.

My eyes flow

With rivers of tears

Because of the destruction

Of my people.”

Once again, this author personalizes his experiences. He turned to his enemies who have railed against him and his friends. Panic, pitfalls, devastation, and destruction have come upon them. He had so many tears flowing that he could create a river, since he was crying about the destruction of his people. These three verses start with the Hebrew consonant letter Phe in this acrostic poem.

The impenetrable Yahweh (Lam 3:43-3:45)

Samek

“You have wrapped yourself

With anger.

You have pursued us.

You have killed us

Without pity.

You have wrapped yourself

With a cloud.

Thus no prayer

Can pass through.

You have made us filth.

You have made us rubbish.

Among the people.”

This author turns in an unanswered prayer towards Yahweh, addressing him in the second person singular. Yahweh had wrapped himself in anger and a cloud. He had pursued this author and his friends, killing them without pity. Their prayers to Yahweh could not penetrate through the clouds. They had become filth and rubbish among all people as they were forsaken and downtrodden. These three verses start with the Hebrew consonant letter Samek in this acrostic poem.