Wisdom as a lover (Wis 8:2-8:4)

“I loved her.

I sought her

From my youth.

I desired to take her

For my bride.

I became enamored

Of her beauty.

She glorifies her noble birth

By living with God.

The Lord of all loves her.

She is an initiate

In the knowledge of God.

She is

An associate in his works.”

Now we have a profession of love for wisdom. This author seems to think that wisdom is his lover. He has loved (ἐφίλησα) her since his youth. He wanted to marry (νύμφην) her because of her beauty. She had a noble birth. She lives with God (συμβίωσιν Θεοῦ), the Lord of all. She has knowledge about God (τοῦ Θεοῦ ἐπιστήμης). She associates with God in his works (τῶν ἔργων αὐτοῦ). This almost appears like a mystical union of the author (Solomon) and his lover, wisdom. This sounds more like the medieval mystical nuns who loved Jesus and wanted to be his bride, but only here it is from a male perspective.

His response (Song 5:1-5:1)

Male lover

“I come to my garden.

My sister!

My bride!

I gather my myrrh

With my spice.

I eat my honeycomb

With my honey.

I drink my wine

With my milk.

Eat!

Friends!

Be drunk

With love.”

The male lover came to the garden of his bride. He gathered his myrrh and spice. He ate the honey in his honeycomb. He drank milk with wine. That does not sound good. He or someone else asked him and his friends to eat and be drunk with love. Surely this is a love poem.