Queen Esther asks for the revocation of the Haman decree (Esth 8:3-8:6)

“Then Queen Esther spoke again to the king. She fell at his feet, weeping. She pleaded with him to avert the evil design of Haman the Agagite and the plot which he had devised against the Jews. The king held out the golden scepter to Esther. Esther rose and stood before the king. She said.

‘If it pleases the king,

If I have won his favor,

If the thing seem right before the king,

If I have his approval,

Let an order be written to revoke the letters

Devised by Haman the Agagite, the son of Hammedatha,

Which he wrote giving orders to destroy the Jews

Who are in all the provinces of the king.

How can I bear to see the calamity that is coming on my people?

How can I bear to see the destruction of my kindred?’”

Queen Esther again pleaded with the king. She wanted him to rescind the order that Haman had sent out about the execution of all the Jews in the provinces of Persia. Once again, she recognized the authority of the king as he placed his golden scepter on her. She wanted orders sent out to revoke the letter of Haman. She wondered how she could bear to see all this bloodshed on her people and relatives. You have to remember that the king had agreed with the letter of Haman.

Queen Esther faints again (Greek text only)

“Then the king raised the golden scepter. He touched Queen Esther’s neck with it. He embraced her. He said to her. ‘Speak to me.’ She said to him.

‘I saw you, my lord,

Like an angel of God.

My heart was shaken with fear at your glory.

You are wonderful, my lord.

Your countenance is full of grace.’

While she was speaking, she fainted and fell. Then the king was agitated. All his servants sought to comfort her.”

The Greek text continued to show a kind king. The king reached out with the golden scepter and placed on the neck of Queen Esther. He embraced her. She then said that he appeared like an angel and that she was afraid. However, she once again fainted. This made the king angry as everyone wanted to comfort her. Thus this ends the interlude of the 9 little episodes that are found only in the Greek text. The story returns to the Hebrew text which summarizes these events. In fact, they are probably an elaboration of the simple Hebrew text.