Honored (Lk 14:10-14:10)

“But when you are invited,

Go!

Sit down

At the lowest place!

Thus,

When your host

Comes,

He may say

To you.

‘Friend!

Move up higher!’

Then you will be honored

In the presence

Of all

Who are sitting

At table

With you.”

 

ἀλλ’ ὅταν κληθῇς, πορευθεὶς ἀνάπεσε εἰς τὸν ἔσχατον τόπον, ἵνα ὅταν ἔλθῃ ὁ κεκληκώς σε ἐρεῖ σοι Φίλε, προσανάβηθι ἀνώτερον· τότε ἔσται σοι δόξα ἐνώπιον πάντων τῶν συνανακειμένων σοι.

 

Next Luke uniquely continued with this Jesus parable.  Jesus said that when you are invited to someplace (ἀλλ’ ὅταν κληθῇς), you should go and sit down or recline at the lowest place (πορευθεὶς ἀνάπεσε εἰς τὸν ἔσχατον τόπον).  Then when your host who had invited you comes and sees you (ἵνα ὅταν ἔλθῃ ὁ κεκληκώς σε) he might say to you (ἐρεῖ σοι), “Friend (Φίλε)! Move or come up higher (προσανάβηθι ἀνώτερον)!”  This προσανάβηθι is another unique word of Luke.  Then you will be honored or glorified (τότε ἔσται σοι δόξα) in the presence of all those (ἐνώπιον πάντων) sitting or reclining at the table with you (τῶν συνανακειμένων σοι).  In other words, take the lower seat so that you would be honored when the host noticed who you were.  That assumes that the host knows who you are, otherwise, why would he have invited you?  Have you ever been invited some place where you hardly knew anyone?

He will get up (Lk 11:8-11:8)

“I tell you!

Even though

He will not get up

And give him anything,

Because he is his friend,

At least,

Because of his persistence,

He will get up.

He will give him

Whatever he needs.”

 

λέγω ὑμῖν, εἰ καὶ οὐ δώσει αὐτῷ ἀναστὰς διὰ τὸ εἶναι φίλον αὐτοῦ, διά γε τὴν ἀναιδίαν αὐτοῦ ἐγερθεὶς δώσει αὐτῷ ὅσων χρῄζει.

 

Luke uniquely brought this parable story about waking up a friend at midnight to a surprise ending.  In this conclusion, Jesus proclaimed solemnly (λέγω ὑμῖν), that even though this friend will not get up and give him anything (εἰ καὶ οὐ δώσει αὐτῷ ἀναστὰς), because he was his friend (διὰ τὸ εἶναι φίλον αὐτοῦ), at least, because of his persistence (διά γε τὴν ἀναιδίαν αὐτοῦ), he will get up (ἐγερθεὶς) and give him whatever he needed (δώσει αὐτῷ ὅσων χρῄζει).  Problem solved, as persistence was better than friendship.  In a complete turnaround, this friend offered his requesting persistent neighbor friend whatever he wanted.  That’s what friends are for.  However, it was the persistence rather than the friendship that led him to act.  So that is the moral of this story.  Perseverance in prayer to the Father will lead to success.  Do you persist in prayer to God?

Nothing to serve (Lk 11:6-11:6)

“A friend of mine

Has arrived

From a long journey

At my house.

I have nothing

To set before him.”

 

ἐπειδὴ φίλος μου παρεγένετο ἐξ ὁδοῦ πρός με καὶ οὐκ ἔχω ὃ παραθήσω αὐτῷ·

 

Luke uniquely had this parable story about waking up a friend in the middle of the night.  Luke indicated that Jesus said that this man went to his neighbor friend and said that his other friend (ἐπειδὴ φίλος μου) had just arrived (παρεγένετο) from a long journey (ἐξ ὁδοῦ) at his house (πρός με), but he said that he had nothing to set before him (καὶ οὐκ ἔχω ὃ παραθήσω αὐτῷ).  Tough luck!  This certainly was a strange request at midnight.  At least this guy had 2 friends, at least for now.  One friend just showed up at his house in the middle of the night and the other friend was his close neighbor.  One of these 2 friends is not going to be happy.  Perhaps, there should have been some planning along the line here.  He has nothing to serve his long-lost friend, and assumes that this neighbor friend has something to give him to eat.  Do you always have extra food on hand?

Not against you (Lk 9:50-9:50)

“But Jesus

Said to him.

‘Do not stop him!

Whoever

Is not against you

Is for you.’”

 

εἶπεν δὲ πρὸς αὐτὸν Ἰησοῦς Μὴ κωλύετε· ὃς γὰρ οὐκ ἔστιν καθ’ ὑμῶν, ὑπὲρ ὑμῶν ἐστιν.

 

Luke indicated that Jesus told them (εἶπεν δὲ πρὸς αὐτὸν Ἰησοῦς) not to stop (Μὴ κωλύετε) this exorcist who was casting out demons in the name of Jesus.  Jesus said that whoever is not against them (ὃς γὰρ οὐκ ἔστιν καθ’ ὑμῶν) is for them (ὑπὲρ ὑμῶν ἐστιν).  There is a similar statement to this in Mark, chapter 9:39-40, but not in MatthewMark indicated that Jesus told them not to stop or prevent this exorcist who used his name.  Jesus said that no one who did a deed of exorcistic power in his name would be able to easily or readily speak evil of him, after what they had done.  You were a friend until you became an enemy.  If they were not against Jesus, then they must be for him.  Do you think that anybody is really against you?

The Son of Man (Lk 7:34-7:34)

“The Son of Man

Has come

Eating

And drinking.

Yet you say.

‘Look!

A glutton!

Look!

A drunkard!

Look!

A friend

Of tax collectors

And sinners!’”

 

ἐλήλυθεν ὁ Υἱὸς τοῦ ἀνθρώπου ἐσθίων καὶ πίνων, καὶ λέγετε Ἰδοὺ ἄνθρωπος φάγος καὶ οἰνοπότης, φίλος τελωνῶν καὶ ἁμαρτωλῶν

 

Luke indicated that Jesus said that the Son of Man came (ἐλήλυθεν ὁ Υἱὸς τοῦ ἀνθρώπου) eating (ἐσθίων) and drinking (καὶ πίνων).  However, they said that he was a glutton (καὶ λέγετε Ἰδοὺ ἄνθρωπος φάγος), a drunkard (καὶ οἰνοπότης), and a friend of tax collectors and sinners (φίλος τελωνῶν καὶ ἁμαρτωλῶν).  Matthew, chapter 11:19, had a similar statement, indicating a possible common Q source.  They called the Son of Man, Jesus, a glutton and a drunkard, because he was eating and drinking.  The Son of Man was also considered a friend or lover to tax collectors and sinners.  In other words, whether you ate or drank, it did not matter, they would find some fault in whatever John or Jesus did.  Do you like to eat and drink and hang out with sinners?

Sins forgiven (Lk 5:20-5:20)

“When Jesus

Saw their faith,

He said.

‘Friend!

Your sins

Are forgiven you!’”

 

καὶ ἰδὼν τὴν πίστιν αὐτῶν εἶπεν Ἄνθρωπε, ἀφέωνταί σοι αἱ ἁμαρτίαι σου.

 

Luke said that when Jesus saw their faith (καὶ ἰδὼν τὴν πίστιν αὐτῶν), he said to him (εἶπεν), calling him friend or man (Ἄνθρωπε), that his sins were forgiven (ἀφέωνταί σοι αἱ ἁμαρτίαι σου).  This is almost word for word like Mark, chapter 2:5, and Matthew, chapter 9:2, so that Mark might be the source of this saying.  Mark said that Jesus noticed their faith.  He then said to the paralytic that his sins were forgiven or taken away.  The idea that sickness and sin had a common connection was prevalent.  In fact, Jesus called this paralyzed man son in Mark and Matthew, but Luke called him man or friend, not son.  Matthew said that Jesus, noticing their faith, then told the paralytic to have courage, because his sins were forgiven.  Faith and healing seemed to go hand in hand.

For or against Jesus (Mk 9:40-9:40)

“Whoever is

Not against us,

Is for us.”

 

ὃς γὰρ οὐκ ἔστιν καθ’ ἡμῶν, ὑπὲρ ἡμῶν ἐστιν.

 

This short saying is word for word in Luke, chapter 9:49, but not in MatthewMark indicated that Jesus said that whoever was not against them (ὃς γὰρ οὐκ ἔστιν καθ’ ἡμῶν), then he was for them (ὑπὲρ ἡμῶν ἐστιν).  You were a friend until you became an enemy.  If they were not against Jesus, then they must be for him.