My time in the womb (Ps 139:13-139:18)

“You formed my inward parts.

You knit me together in my mother’s womb.

I praise you!

I am fearfully made.

I am wonderfully made.

Wonderful are your works!

I know them very well.

My frame was not hidden from you.

I was being made in secret.

I was intricately woven in the depths of the earth.

Your eyes beheld my unformed substance.

In your book were written

All the days that was formed for me,

When none of them as yet existed.

How weighty to me are your thoughts!

O God!

How vast is the sum of them!

If I would count them,

They are more than the sand.

I come to the end.

I am still with you.”

In beautiful colorful language, David, the psalmist, describes his life in the womb, and how he came to be. He was knit together in the womb of his mother by Yahweh. Thus pregnancy is time of knitting. He was made in secret as Yahweh intricately wove him in the depths of the womb. Earth was like the womb. He praised Yahweh for the wonderful work he had become, even as an unformed substance in the womb of his mother. Yahweh had this book of life where he kept track of his future days here on earth. The thoughts of Yahweh are so vast and deep that they cannot be counted because they are like the sands of the seashore. Even now, that his life is now ending, he still was with Yahweh. This is a masterful section about the womb as a place where Yahweh was knitting and weaving the human before his birth. What a powerful argument against abortion.

Praise Yahweh (Ps 100:1-100:2)

A psalm of thanksgiving

“Make a joyful noise to Yahweh!

All the earth!

Worship Yahweh with gladness!

Come into his presence with singing!”

Psalm 100 is like the doxology or ending of the psalms about the kingship of Yahweh. It clearly is a thanksgiving psalm as the title indicates. We are asked to praise Yahweh. Everyone should make a joyful noise as they worship Yahweh with gladness. They are to come into his presence singing.

Deliverance comes from Zion (Ps 53:6-53:6)

“O that deliverance for Israel

Would come out of Zion!

When Yahweh restores

The fortunes of his people,

Jacob shall rejoice.

Israel shall be glad.”

We have this happy ending to this short psalm that is exactly the same as Psalm 14. There is a hint here of the captivity, rather than the time of David when Israel was still in one country. Here there is a restoration. There is a need for deliverance that would come from Zion. Jacob or Israel would rejoice again. Israel would be glad. The evildoers would be gone.

Wake up Yahweh (Ps 44:23-44:26)

“Rouse yourself!

Why do you sleep?

Yahweh!

Awake!

Do not cast us off forever!

Why do you hide your face?

Why do you forget our affliction and oppression?

We sink down to the dust.

Our bodies cling to the ground.

Rise up!

Come to our help!

Redeem us!

For the sake of your steadfast love!’

Instead of an ending praise, this is like a command to God to help them. This psalmist wanted God to wake up from his sleep. They did not want to be cast off forever. Why was God hiding his face? Had he forgotten about their afflictions and oppressions? They were sinking like dust on the ground. He wanted God to rise up and help him. He wanted God to show his steadfast love by saving them.

Hope in God (Ps 42:11-42:11)

“Why are you cast down?

O my soul!

Why are you disquieted within me?

Hope in God!

I shall again praise him!

My help!

My God!”

Of course, we have a happy ending to this psalm. The psalmist accuses his soul of upsetting him. He was going to hope in God. He would sing his praises again. God was his help. Thus despite some grievances, this northern psalmist still believed and praised God.

Continual praise to Yahweh (Ps 7:17-7:17)

“I will give

To Yahweh,

The thanks due to his righteousness.

I will sing praise

To the name of Yahweh,

the Most High.”

David will give thanks to Yahweh, perhaps in some sort of ritual thanksgiving sacrifice. He will continually sing or play an instrument before Yahweh, the most high God. Once again, this is a formal ending indicating that this psalm was meant to be sung. This was to be repeated over and over again as a praise thanksgiving remembrance to the most high Yahweh, God of all.