Power left Jesus (Lk 8:46-8:46)

“But Jesus said.

‘Someone touched me!

I noticed

That power

Had gone out

From me!’”

 

ὁ δὲ Ἰησοῦς εἶπεν Ἥψατό μού τις· ἐγὼ γὰρ ἔγνων δύναμιν ἐξεληλυθυῖαν ἀπ’ ἐμοῦ.

 

Luke indicated that Jesus said (ὁ δὲ Ἰησοῦς εἶπεν) that someone touched him (Ἥψατό μού τις).  He noticed that power had gone out from him (ἐγὼ γὰρ ἔγνων δύναμιν ἐξεληλυθυῖαν ἀπ’ ἐμοῦ).  This discussion of Jesus about his power and someone touching him can be found in Mark, chapter 5:30-32, but not in Matthew.  Here, the discussion was with Peter, not the disciples.  However, Mark said that his disciples said to him that there was such a large crowd pressing in on him.  Why was he saying who touched him?  How would they be able to tell who touched him?  However, Jesus looked all around to see who had touched him.  He was determined to know who it was that had received his power.  Are you inquisitive?

Tax collectors and sinners (Lk 5:30-5:30)

“The Pharisees

And their Scribes

Were complaining

To Jesus’ disciples.

They said.

‘Why do you eat

And drink

With tax collectors

And sinners?’”

 

καὶ ἐγόγγυζον οἱ Φαρισαῖοι καὶ οἱ γραμματεῖς αὐτῶν πρὸς τοὺς μαθητὰς αὐτοῦ λέγοντες Διὰ τί μετὰ τῶν τελωνῶν καὶ ἁμαρτωλῶν ἐσθίετε καὶ πίνετε;

 

Luke said that the Pharisees and their Scribes were complaining or grumbling (καὶ ἐγόγγυζον οἱ Φαρισαῖοι καὶ οἱ γραμματεῖς αὐτῶν) to Jesus’ disciples (πρὸς τοὺς μαθητὰς αὐτοῦ).  They wondered (λέγοντες) why they were with Jesus eating and drinking (ἐσθίετε καὶ πίνετε) with tax collectors and sinners (Διὰ τί μετὰ τῶν τελωνῶν καὶ ἁμαρτωλῶν).  Mark, chapter 2:16, and Matthew, chapter 9:11, are similar to Luke, so that Mark might be the source of this incident.  In Matthew, it was only the Pharisees and not the Scribes who are complaining.  Mark and Luke have both these Pharisees and their Scribes grumble about this dinner party.  They saw that Jesus and his disciples was eating and drinking with these sinners and tax collectors.  Then they asked the disciples of Jesus, and not Jesus himself, why was Jesus eating with these tax collectors and sinners?  These Pharisees were a political party, a social movement, and a religious school of thought that became the basis for later Rabbinic Judaism.  They had they own expert explanations of Jewish law that sometimes appeared to be hypocritical or arrogant, with the letter of the law above its spirit.  They had a form of Judaism that extended beyond the Temple.  The Pharisees in the New Testament engaged in conflicts with Jesus and his disciples, as here.  However, Paul the Apostle may have been a Pharisee before his conversion.  Maybe Jesus and some of his followers were Pharisees, so that these arguments with the Pharisees may have been internal arguments.  Or is this portrait of the Pharisees in the New Testament a caricature, since the late first century Christians were fighting with the emerging Rabbinic Pharisees?  Their position towards the Scribes was a mixed bag.  These Scribes were religious experts who determined the traditions to be followed, as professional copiers of manuscript documents, although they had a wider role in Jewish society.

Jesus spoke with authority (Lk 4:32-4:32)

“They were astonished

At his teaching,

Because he spoke

With authority.”

 

καὶ ἐξεπλήσσοντο ἐπὶ τῇ διδαχῇ αὐτοῦ, ὅτι ἐν ἐξουσίᾳ ἦν ὁ λόγος αὐτοῦ

 

Luke said that they were astonished (καὶ ἐξεπλήσσοντο) at his teaching (ἐπὶ τῇ διδαχῇ αὐτοῦ), because he spoke with authority (ὅτι ἐν ἐξουσίᾳ ἦν ὁ λόγος αὐτοῦ).  There is something similar to this in Mark, chapter 1:22, and Matthew, chapter 7:29, where Jesus was teaching with authority.  Mark said, just like Luke, word for word, that the people of this Capernaum synagogue were amazed at his teaching since he taught them as if he had authority.  However, Mark added that he was not like one of the Scribes, who were religious experts that determined the traditions to be followed.  Matthew, chapter 7:29, said that this amazing Jesus taught on his own authority without referring to tradition.  What was this authority that Jesus had?

The Jewish high priests (Lk 3:2-3:2)

“The high-priest

Was Annas

And Caiaphas.”

 

ἐπὶ ἀρχιερέως Ἄννα καὶ Καϊάφα,

 

Luke further set the historical background, as he indicated that there were two Jewish high priests (ἐπὶ ἀρχιερέως) Annas (Ἄννα) and Caiaphas (καὶ Καϊάφα).  The role of the Jewish high priest in Jerusalem was determined by the Roman authorities.  Annas had been the high priest from 6-15 CE, before he was deposed.  His sons took over, but eventually Caiaphas, his son in law, became the high priest from 18-36 CE, the correct timeframe for the activities of John and Jesus.  Annas had some prestige, connection, or power over Caiaphas as the former high priest and father in law.

Why does Elijah come first? (Mk 9:11-9:11)

“Then they asked him.

‘Why do the Scribes say

That Elijah

Must come first?’”

 

καὶ ἐπηρώτων αὐτὸν λέγοντες Ὅτι λέγουσιν οἱ γραμματεῖς ὅτι Ἡλείαν δεῖ ἐλθεῖν πρῶτον;

 

The role of Elijah can be found also in Matthew, chapter 17:10, as well as here in Mark.  The disciples of Jesus asked, questioned or interrogated him (καὶ ἐπηρώτησαν αὐτὸν λέγοντες) about why the Scribes said (Ὅτι λέγουσιν οἱ γραμματεῖς) that Elijah had to come first (ὅτι Ἡλείαν δεῖ ἐλθεῖν πρῶτον).  The prophet Malachi, chapter 4:5, had also foretold the coming of Elijah.  He said that Yahweh was going to send the prophet Elijah before the great and terrible day of Yahweh would come.  These Scribes were contemporary religious experts who determined the traditions to be followed.  They were professional copiers of manuscript documents, although they had a wider role in Jewish society.

It was a pretty big crowd (Mk 5:31-5:32)

“His disciples

Said to him.

‘You see the crowd!

They are pressing in

On you.

How can you say?

‘Who touched me?’

He looked all around

To see

Who had done it.”

 

αὶ ἔλεγκον αὐτῷ οἱ μαθηταὶ αὐτοῦ Βλέπεις τὸν ὄχλον συνθλίβοντά σε, καὶ λέγεις Τίς μου ἥψατο

καὶ περιεβλέπετο ἰδεῖν τὴν τοῦτο ποιήσασαν.

 

This discussion can be found in Luke, chapter 8:45-46, but not in Matthew.  In Luke, the discussion is with Peter, not the disciples.  Mark said that his disciples said to him (αὶ ἔλεγκον αὐτῷ οἱ μαθηταὶ αὐτοῦ) that there was a large crowd pressing in on him (Βλέπεις τὸν ὄχλον συνθλίβοντά σε).  Why was he saying who touched him (καὶ λέγεις Τίς μου ἥψατο)?  How would they be able to tell who touched him.  However, Jesus looked all around to see who had touched him (καὶ περιεβλέπετο ἰδεῖν τὴν τοῦτο ποιήσασαν).  Jesus was determined to know who had touched him.