Description of the wicked (Ps 36:1-36:4)

To the choirmaster leader, a psalm of David, the servant of Yahweh

Transgression speaks to the wicked.

Deep in their hearts

There is no fear of God.

Before their eyes,

They flatter themselves in their own eyes.

They believe that their iniquity cannot be found out.

Therefore it cannot be hated.

The words of their mouths are mischief and deceit.

They have ceased to act wisely.

They have ceased to do good.

They plot mischief while on their beds.

They are set on a way that is not good.

They do not reject evil.”

In this Psalm 36, the title indicates that there was a choir leader. This psalm of David, called him the servant of Yahweh. There is a description of the wicked. Most of all they do not fear God. They are flatterers, mischievous, and deceitful. They think that no one knows what they are doing. They were always plotting mischief, even while in bed. Therefore they were not good and wise, but rather evil in their ways. They are on an evil path, not a good path.

The suffering servant (Ps 22:1-22:2)

To the choirmaster leader, according to the deer of the dawn, a psalm of David

My God!

My God!

Why have you forsaken me?

Why are you so far from helping me?

Why are you so far from the words of my groaning?

O my God!

I cry by day.

But you do not answer.

I cry by night.

But I find no rest.”

This Psalm 22 is a psalm of David with a choir leader. However, there is a notation “according to the deer of the dawn,” which probably refers to some lost hymn or tune. This is a psalm for help or deliverance from a serious illness or persecution. This is much like the suffering servant in Isaiah, chapters 52-53. The Gospel of Matthew, chapter 27, and the Gospel of Mark, chapter 15 indicated that Jesus Christ quoted the first few verses of his psalm as he hung on the cross. The forsaken one cried to God. Why was no help coming from God? The suffering one cried during the day and at night, but there was no answer. He could not find any rest.

Yahweh’s response is positive (Ps 21:1-21:2)

To the choirmaster leader, a psalm of David

In your strength the king rejoices!

Yahweh!

In your help

How greatly he exults!

You have given him

His heart’s desire!

You have not withheld the request of his lips.

Selah”

This Psalm 21 is a psalm of thanksgiving after a victory of David. Once again there is mention of the choir leader as a psalm of David. Yahweh has given strength to the king during the battle. He has helped the king to succeed. Yahweh has given David his heart’s desire. Just as in the preceding psalm, they wanted Yahweh to give David his heart’s desire. Now they are thankful that he has received his heart’s desire. He has not held back from the request of David’s lips. Once again, it is time for the Selah or musical pause for meditation.

David wants Yahweh to hears his lament (Ps 13:1-13:2)

“To the choirmaster leader, a psalm of David.

How long,

Yahweh?

Will you forget me forever?

How long will you hide your face from me?

How long must I bear pain in my soul?

How long must I have sorrow in my heart all day long?

How long shall my enemy be exalted over me?”

This is another short Psalm 13 with no other mention than a choir leader and David. David has a personal lament. He wanted to know how long Yahweh would forget him. How long would Yahweh hide his face from him? How long would he have sorrow in his heart and soul all day long? How long would his enemies exalt over him? Clearly David was concerned that he was being neglected by Yahweh.