Our days are numbered (Lam 4:18-4:18)

Cade

“They dogged

Our steps.

Thus we could

Not walk

In our streets.

Our end

Drew near.

Our days

Were numbered.

Our end

Had come.”

This verse speaks in the first person plural, referring to the people of Jerusalem. Their enemies persisted in watching them walking, so that they could not step out into the streets. Their end was near. Their days were numbered. Their end had come. They would be no more.   This verse starts with the Hebrew consonant letter Cade in this acrostic poem.

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The lost hunted one (Lam 3:52-3:54)

Cade

“My enemies,

Without cause,

Have hunted me

Like a bird.

They flung me

Alive

Into a pit.

They hurled stones

On me.

Water closed

Over my head.

I said.

‘I am lost.’”

This personal story continues. The author’s enemies have hunted him down like a bird, even though there was no reason to do so. They have flung him alive into a pit and threw stones over him. Then water closed over his head in this pit. He finally said that he was lost with no way out. This is reminiscent of Jeremiah in the cistern well under King Zedekiah in Jeremiah, chapter 38. These three verses start with the Hebrew consonant letter Cade in this acrostic poem.

Cry for Zion (Lam 2:18-2:18)

Cade

“Cry aloud

To the Lord!

O wall

Of daughter Zion!

Let tears

Stream down

Like a torrent,

Day and night!

Give yourself

No rest!

Give your eyes

No respite!”

This author wants daughter Zion and her wall to cry to Yahweh. Their tears should stream down like a torrent of water, day and night. There was to be no rest. Their eyes should always be crying. This verse starts with the Hebrew consonant letter Cade. Each verse after this will use the next letter of the Hebrew alphabet in this acrostic poem.

Yahweh is just (Lam 1:18-1:18)

Cade

“Yahweh

Is in the right.

I have rebelled

Against his word.

Hear!

All you people!

Behold my suffering!

My young women,

My young men,

Have gone

Into captivity.”

Once again, we are back to a personal lament from Jerusalem about how Yahweh was correct in bringing suffering to her. Jerusalem had rebelled against the word of Yahweh. Now Jerusalem wanted everyone to see her suffering, since both her young men and young women have gone into captivity. This verse starts with the Hebrew consonant letter Cade. Each verse after this will use the next letter of the Hebrew alphabet in this acrostic poem.

Yahweh is righteous (Ps 119:137-119:144)

Cade

“You are righteous!

Yahweh!

Your judgments are right.

You have appointed your decrees in righteousness.

You have appointed your decrees in all faithfulness.

My zeal consumes me.

Because my foes forget your words.

Your promise is well tried.

Your servant loves it.

I am small.

I am despised.

Yet I do not forget your precepts.

Your righteousness is an everlasting righteousness.

Your law is the truth.

Trouble has come upon me.

Anguish has come upon me,

However your commandments are my delight.

Your decrees are righteous forever.

Give me understanding!

Thus I may live.”

The psalmist declared that Yahweh was righteous. His judgments and decrees were righteous and faithful. The zeal of the psalmist consumed him when he found out that his foes had forgotten the words of Yahweh. He, the servant of Yahweh, loved the decrees. Although he was small and despised, he never forgot the precepts of Yahweh. Yahweh’s righteousness was everlasting because his law was the truth. Even though he was in trouble and anguish, the psalmist delighted in Yahweh’s commandments. All he asked for was understanding, so that he might live. So ends this section on the eighteenth consonant letter of the Hebrew alphabet, Cade.