They said that the Lord needs it (Lk 19:34-19:34)

“They said.

‘The Lord needs it.’”

 

οἱ δὲ εἶπαν ὅτι Ὁ Κύριος αὐτοῦ χρείαν ἔχει.

 

Luke indicated that their response (οἱ δὲ εἶπαν) was simple and precise.  “The Lord needs it (Ὁ Κύριος αὐτοῦ χρείαν ἔχει).”  Was this some sort of secret password to show who they were?  This is similar to Mark, chapter 11:6, where Mark said that the response of these two disciples was what they had been prepared to say.  They told these bystanders (οἱ δὲ εἶπαν αὐτοῖς) what Jesus had told them to say (καθὼς εἶπεν ὁ Ἰησοῦς).  Thus, these people in this town allowed these unnamed disciples to take the colt with them (καὶ ἀφῆκαν αὐτούς).  Mission accomplished!  How would these bystanders know about the master?

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Why are you untying the colt? (Lk 19:33-19:33)

“As they were untying

The colt,

Its owners asked them.

‘Why are you untying

The colt?’”

 

λυόντων δὲ αὐτῶν τὸν πῶλον εἶπαν οἱ κύριοι αὐτοῦ πρὸς αὐτούς Τί λύετε τὸν πῶλον;

 

Luke said that that as these two disciples were untying the young colt (λυόντων δὲ αὐτῶν τὸν πῶλον), its owners or masters asked them (εἶπαν οἱ κύριοι αὐτοῦ πρὸς αὐτούς) why were they untying this colt (Τί λύετε τὸν πῶλον)?  This is similar to Mark, chapter 11:5, since Matthew had nothing about this.  Mark said that some of the bystanders (καί τινες τῶν ἐκεῖ ἑστηκότων), not the owners, spoke to Jesus’ two unnamed disciples (ἔλεγον αὐτοῖς).  They asked them what they were doing (Τί ποιεῖτε)?  Why were they untying the colt (λύοντες τὸν πῶλον)?  Jesus had told them to expect these kinds of questions.  Would you question someone who was taking your animal?

He has ten already (Lk 19:25-19:25)

“However,

They said

To the nobleman.

‘Lord!

He already

Has ten minas!’”

 

καὶ εἶπαν αὐτῷ Κύριε, ἔχει δέκα μνᾶς.

 

Luke uniquely indicated that Jesus remarked that the bystanders said to the nobleman (καὶ εἶπαν αὐτῷ), lord (Κύριε), that he already had 10 minas (ἔχει δέκα μνᾶς).  Luke seemed to understand this problem of fairness and equality, but there was no complaint in Matthew.  Is it fair to give more to people who already have a lot?

Take his money away (Lk 19:24-19:24)

“The nobleman said

To the bystanders.

‘Take the mina

From him!

Give it to the one

Who has the ten minas!’”

 

καὶ τοῖς παρεστῶσιν εἶπεν Ἄρατε ἀπ’ αὐτοῦ τὴν μνᾶν καὶ δότε τῷ τὰς δέκα μνᾶς ἔχοντι.

 

Luke indicated that Jesus remarked that the nobleman said to the bystanders (καὶ τοῖς παρεστῶσιν εἶπεν) to take the mina from him (Ἄρατε ἀπ’ αὐτοῦ τὴν μνᾶν) and give it to the one who had earned 10 minas (καὶ δότε τῷ τὰς δέκα μνᾶς ἔχοντι).  This seems harsh, but in sync with the character of the nobleman.  This was similar to Matthew, chapter 25:28, perhaps indicating a Q source.  Jesus, via Matthew, said that this master or slave owner said to his people to take the one talent from this wicked lazy slave (ἄρατε οὖν ἀπ’ αὐτοῦ τὸ τάλαντον) and give it to the slave who already had 10 talents (καὶ δότε τῷ ἔχοντι τὰ δέκα τάλαντα).  That did not seem fair, even though it was a mild punishment.  This lazy slave ended up with nothing, but he really did not want anything.  However, the ambitious industrious slave, who had increased his money, would get even more.  Do you have enough money?

He is calling Elijah (Mk 15:35-15:35)

“When some of the bystanders

Heard it,

They said.

‘Listen!

He is calling

For Elijah!’”

 

καί τινες τῶν παρεστηκότων ἀκούσαντες ἔλεγον Ἴδε Ἡλείαν φωνεῖ.

 

This is almost word for word in Matthew, chapter 27:47.  However this episode was not in Luke, chapter 23, or John, chapter 19.  Mark said that some of the bystanders heard the cry of Jesus on the cross (καί τινες τῶν παρεστηκότων ἀκούσαντες).  They said to listen, since Jesus was calling for Elijah (ἔλεγον Ἴδε Ἡλείαν φωνεῖ).  Elijah often came to help the good people who were in need.  The name “Elijah” was close to “Eloi,” so that some people might have mistakenly thought that Jesus was crying for help from the ancient Israelite prophet Elijah.  Elijah was considered a forerunner of the messianic times, as was the case of John the Baptist.

Peter was confronted a third time (Mk 14:70-14:70)

“Then after a little while,

The bystanders again

Said to Peter.

‘Certainly!

You are one of them!

You are a Galilean!’”

 

καὶ μετὰ μικρὸν πάλιν οἱ παρεστῶτες ἔλεγον τῷ Πέτρῳ Ἀληθῶς ἐξ αὐτῶν εἶ· καὶ γὰρ Γαλιλαῖος εἶ.

 

This is similar to Matthew, chapter 26:73, Luke, chapter 22:59, and John, chapter 18:26, with some changes.  Peter was confronted a 3rd time.  John said that a man recognized, Peter, because he was a relative of the one whose ear Peter had cut off.  Matthew said that after a little while some of the bystanders approached Peter.  Luke said that it was about an hour later when another person came up to Peter.  Mark, like Matthew, said that that after a little while (καὶ μετὰ μικρὸν), some bystanders again said to Peter (ἔλεγον τῷ Πέτρῳ) that he certainly was one of those followers of Jesus (Ἀληθῶς ἐξ αὐτῶν εἶ), because he was from Galilee (καὶ γὰρ Γαλιλαῖος εἶ), a Galilean.  Matthew added that Peter’s accent in his speech betrayed him as a man from Galilee.  For a 3td time, Peter was accused of being a man from Galilee, a follower of Jesus of Nazareth.  You can never escape your accent.

 

Peter was one of them (Mk 14:69-14:69)

“The servant-girl,

On seeing him,

Began again

To say

To the bystanders.

‘This man is

One of them.’”

 

καὶ ἡ παιδίσκη ἰδοῦσα αὐτὸν ἤρξατο πάλιν λέγειν τοῖς παρεστῶσιν ὅτι Οὗτος ἐξ αὐτῶν ἐστιν.

 

This is similar to Matthew, chapter 26:71, Luke, chapter 22:58, and John, chapter 18:25, with some minor changes.  In Mark, it is the same servant-girl rather than a different one as in Matthew.  In John, it was a group of people rather than one individual who addressed Peter.  Mark said that this young servant girl or maid saw Peter again (καὶ ἡ παιδίσκη ἰδοῦσα αὐτὸν).  She then began to say to the bystanders there (ἤρξατο πάλιν λέγειν τοῖς παρεστῶσιν) that this man was one of them with Jesus (Οὗτος ἐξ αὐτῶν ἐστιν).  The message is not to hang around if someone is harassing you.