The revolt of Hoshea (2 Kings 15:30-15:31)

“Then Hoshea son of Elah made a conspiracy against King Pekah son of Remaliah. He attacked him and killed him. King Hoshea reigned in his place, in the twentieth year of King Jotham son of King Azariah. Now the rest of the acts of King Pekah and all that he did are written in the Book of the Annals of the Kings of Israel.”

Once more we have a revolt. The reason seems obvious. Israel is losing land and people to the Assyrians. King Hoshea will be the last king of Israel. He took over during the 20th year of King Jotham in Judah. For more information see your local lost “Book of the Annals of the Kings of Israel.” Interesting enough there is an “Annals of the King Tiglath-pileser” that indicates that he helped Hosea so that Israel then had a pro-Assyrian policy.

 

The death of King Jehoahaz in Israel (2 Kings 13:8-13:9)

“Now the rest of the acts of King Jehoahaz and everything that he did, including his power, are they not written in the Book of the Annals of the Kings of Israel? So King Jehoahaz slept with his ancestors. They buried him in Samaria. Then his son King Joash succeeded him.”

Once again, for further information check your lost “Book of the Annals of the Kings of Israel.” Like his predecessors, he died and was buried in Samaria. There is no indication of what kind of death he endured. Guess what? Hi son was named Joash, the same name as King Joash of Judah who ruled until 796 BCE.

 

The reign of King Jehu in Israel (841-814 BCE) (2 Kings 10:34-10:36)

“Now the rest of the acts of King Jehu, all that he did, and all his powers, are they not written in the Book of the Annals of the Kings of Israel? So King Jehu slept with his ancestors. They buried him in Samaria. His son King Jehoahaz succeeded him. The time that King Jehu reigned over Israel in Samaria was twenty-eight years.”

If you want more information about King Jehu, you can refer to the lost “Book of the Annals of the Kings of Israel.” He died and was buried in Samaria. His son King Jehoahaz took over for him. King Jehu ruled for 28 years in Israel. Thus he had a huge impact because of his long reign. His zeal for Yahweh, his destruction of the house of King Ahab, and his lost of the east bank territory are all part of his legacy.

King Ahaziah dies (2 Kings 1:17-1:18)

“King Ahaziah died according to the word of Yahweh which Elijah had spoken. His brother Jehoram succeeded him in the second year of King Jehoram son of King Jehoshaphat, king of Judah, because King Ahaziah had no son. Now the rest of the acts of King Ahaziah that he did, are they not written in the Book of the Annals of the Kings of Israel?”

Thus it came to pass that King Ahaziah died just as Yahweh via Elijah had said. His brother Jehoram, who had the same name as the king of Judah, became king. Thus we have two kings named Jehoram, living at the same time, but one is king of Judah and the other is the king of Israel. So now we have to be more careful when we use the name Jehoram. In case you are interested and want more information about Ahaziah, you can refer to the missing “The Book of the Annals of the King of Israel.”

The reign of King Omri in Israel (885-874 BCE) (1 Kings 16:25-16:28)

“King Omri did what was evil in the sight of Yahweh. He did more evil than all who were before him. He walked in all the ways of Jeroboam son of Nebat, and in the sins that he caused Israel to commit, provoking Yahweh the God of Israel, to anger by their idols. Now the rest of the acts of King Omri that he did, and the power that he showed, are they not written in the Book of the Annals of the Kings of Israel? King Omri slept with his ancestors. He was buried in Samaria. His son Ahab succeeded him.”

Notice that King Asa of Judah has lived through 6 different kings in Israel, Jeroboam, Nadab, Baasha, Elah, Zimri, and Omri, with at least 4 different families Jeroboam and his son, Baasha and his son, Zimri, and now Omri with his son Ahab. You can compare the stability of Judah with the instability of Israel. King Omri walked in the evil ways of Jeroboam. He, of course, was worst than all who went before him. Notice that King Omri is the first king to be buried in Samaria. He perhaps was more famous at his time than the biblical writer indicated. Extra biblical sources indicate he ruled over Moab.

The reign of King Baasha in Israel (909-886 BCE) (1 Kings 16:5-16:7)

Now the rest of the acts of King Baasha, what he did, and his power, are they not written in the Book of the Annals of the Kings of Israel? King Baasha slept with his ancestors. He was buried at Tirzah. His son Elah succeeded him. Moreover the word of Yahweh came by the prophet Jehu son of Hanani against King Baasha and his house, both because of all the evil that he did in the sight of Yahweh, provoking him to anger with the work of his hands, in being like the house of Jeroboam, and also because he destroyed it.”

If you want to know more about King Baasha and his exploits check with the lost “Annals or Chronicles about the Kings of Israel.” Clearly this was the source for this biblical writer with the constant mention of these 2 books about the kings of Israel and Judah. Interesting enough these kings get buried instead of being eaten by dogs and birds. He also had an heir to the throne, his son Elah. Jehu the prophet had 2 reasons why Yahweh was angry. First, Baasha was just as evil as Jeroboam and his son. Secondly, he had killed Jeroboam’s son and wiped out his entire family. Once again there is the continuing interplay of the prophet or man of God versus the king that started with the prophet Samuel and King Saul. This will be a repetitious theme of the good prophet versus the bad king.

The short reign of King Nadab in Israel (910-909 BCE) (1 Kings 15:31-15:32)

“Now the rest of the acts of Nadab, and all that he did, are they not written in the Book of the Annals of the Kings of Israel? There was war between King Asa and King Baasha of Israel all their days.”

Once again, for more information consult your “Book about the Chronicles and Annals of the kings of Israel.” The background was the continuing war between King Asa of Judah and King Baasha of Israel. We see this war from both sides, which is unusual.