Good answer (Lk 20:39-20:39)

“Then some

Of the Scribes

Answered.

‘Teacher!

You have spoken well.’”

 

ἀποκριθέντες δέ τινες τῶν γραμματέων εἶπαν Διδάσκαλε, καλῶς εἶπας.

 

Luke said that some of the Scribes (ποκριθέντες δέ τινες τῶν γραμματέων), but not Sadducees, answered that Jesus, their teacher (εἶπαν Διδάσκαλε) had spoken well (καλῶς εἶπας).  Matthew, chapter 22:33, noted that when the crowds heard this (καὶ ἀκούσαντες οἱ ὄχλοι), they were astonished or amazed (ἐξεπλήσσοντο) at his teaching (ἐπὶ τῇ διδαχῇ αὐτοῦ), while Mark did not have any further remarks.  Had Jesus given a good answer?

People listened to Jesus (Lk 19:48-19:48)

“However,

They did not find

Anything

They could do.

All the people

Were spellbound

By what they heard.”

 

καὶ οὐχ εὕρισκον τὸ τί ποιήσωσιν· ὁ λαὸς γὰρ ἅπας ἐξεκρέμετο αὐτοῦ ἀκούων.

 

Luke said that these chief priests, Scribes, and other leaders could not find anything (καὶ οὐχ εὕρισκον τὸ) that they could do (τὸ τί ποιήσωσιν), since all the people were spellbound or hanging on the words that they heard from Jesus (ὁ λαὸς γὰρ ἅπας ἐξεκρέμετο αὐτοῦ ἀκούων).  Once again, this word ἐξεκρέμετο, meaning to hang from, hang upon the lips of a speaker, to listen closely or hang out, is only found in Luke, and not in any other Greek biblical writings.  There was something similar in Mark, chapter 11:17.  Mark said that the leaders were afraid of Jesus (ἐφοβοῦντο γὰρ αὐτόν), because the whole crowd (πᾶς γὰρ ὁ ὄχλος) was spellbound or astonished (ἐξεπλήσσετο) by his teaching (πὶ τῇ διδαχῇ αὐτοῦ).  There was nothing like this in Matthew.  Have you ever heard a speaker who was spellbinding to you?

Prophecy fulfilled for the twelve apostles (Lk 18:31-18:31)

“Jesus took

The twelve aside.

He said to them.

‘See!

We are going up

To Jerusalem!

Everything

That is written

About the Son of Man

By the prophets

Will be accomplished.’”

 

Παραλαβὼν δὲ τοὺς δώδεκα εἶπεν πρὸς αὐτούς Ἰδοὺ ἀναβαίνομεν εἰς Ἱερουσαλήμ, καὶ τελεσθήσεται πάντα τὰ γεγραμμένα διὰ τῶν προφητῶν τῷ Υἱῷ τοῦ ἀνθρώπου

 

Luke indicated that Jesus took the 12 apostles aside (Παραλαβὼν δὲ τοὺς δώδεκα).  He said to them (εἶπεν πρὸς αὐτούς) that they were going up to Jerusalem (Ἰδοὺ ἀναβαίνομεν εἰς Ἱερουσαλήμ).  Everything that was written (πάντα τὰ γεγραμμένα) about the Son of Man (ῷ Υἱῷ τοῦ ἀνθρώπου) by the prophets (διὰ τῶν προφητῶν) would be accomplished (καὶ τελεσθήσεται).  Mark, chapter 10:32, and Matthew, chapter 20:17, have something similar to this.  Mark said that while they were on the road towards Jerusalem (Ἦσαν δὲ ἐν τῇ ὁδῷ ἀναβαίνοντες εἰς Ἱεροσόλυμα), Jesus was walking ahead of them (καὶ ἦν προάγων αὐτοὺς ὁ Ἰησοῦς).  These followers of Jesus were amazed or astonished, yet at the same time they were afraid (καὶ ἐθαμβοῦντο, οἱ δὲ ἀκολουθοῦντες ἐφοβοῦντο).  Jesus then took his 12 leaders aside by themselves again (καὶ παραλαβὼν πάλιν τοὺς δώδεκα).  They were merely called the 12 “τοὺς δώδεκα,” clearly indicating the elite 12 apostolic leaders.  Jesus began to speak to them (ἤρξατο αὐτοῖς λέγειν) about what was going to happen to him (τὰ μέλλοντα αὐτῷ συμβαίνειν).  In Matthew, while Jesus was near Jerusalem (Μέλλων δὲ ἀναβαίνειν Ἰησοῦς εἰς Ἱεροσόλυμα), he took his 12 leaders aside by themselves (παρέλαβεν τοὺς δώδεκα κατ’ ἰδίαν), as they went on their way to Jerusalem (καὶ ἐν τῇ ὁδῷ εἶπεν αὐτοῖς).  In other words, this was not a general proclamation, but a semi-secret saying just for the leaders, the 12, much like a gnostic group with some of the top people knowing more than the others.  Do you like to know things that others do not know?

Who can be saved? (Lk 18:26-18:26)

“Those who heard it

Said.

‘Then who can be saved?’”

 

εἶπαν δὲ οἱ ἀκούσαντες Καὶ τίς δύναται σωθῆναι;

 

Luke indicated that those who heard this saying of Jesus about the wealthy people then said (εἶπαν δὲ οἱ ἀκούσαντες) who could be saved (Καὶ τίς δύναται σωθῆναι)?  This same reaction of the disciples can be found in Mark, chapter 10:26, and Matthew, chapter 19:25, almost word for word among them.  Mark said that the disciples of Jesus were very shocked, astonished, and amazed (οἱ δὲ περισσῶς ἐξεπλήσσοντο).  They said to themselves (λέγοντες πρὸς ἑαυτούς), who then could possibly be saved (Καὶ τίς δύναται σωθῆναι)?  In Matthew, when the disciples of Jesus heard this saying (ἀκούσαντες δὲ οἱ μαθηταὶ), they were greatly shocked, astonished, and amazed (ἐξεπλήσσοντο σφόδρα).  They then wondered who then could possibly be saved (Τίς ἄρα δύναται σωθῆναι)?  Could anyone be saved?  Everyone had some kind of wealth, so that this was a very difficult saying for them.  Is this saying about wealth shocking to you?

Jesus spoke with authority (Lk 4:32-4:32)

“They were astonished

At his teaching,

Because he spoke

With authority.”

 

καὶ ἐξεπλήσσοντο ἐπὶ τῇ διδαχῇ αὐτοῦ, ὅτι ἐν ἐξουσίᾳ ἦν ὁ λόγος αὐτοῦ

 

Luke said that they were astonished (καὶ ἐξεπλήσσοντο) at his teaching (ἐπὶ τῇ διδαχῇ αὐτοῦ), because he spoke with authority (ὅτι ἐν ἐξουσίᾳ ἦν ὁ λόγος αὐτοῦ).  There is something similar to this in Mark, chapter 1:22, and Matthew, chapter 7:29, where Jesus was teaching with authority.  Mark said, just like Luke, word for word, that the people of this Capernaum synagogue were amazed at his teaching since he taught them as if he had authority.  However, Mark added that he was not like one of the Scribes, who were religious experts that determined the traditions to be followed.  Matthew, chapter 7:29, said that this amazing Jesus taught on his own authority without referring to tradition.  What was this authority that Jesus had?

Mary complains to Jesus (Lk 2:48-2:48)

“When his parents

Saw Jesus,

They were astonished.

His mother

Said to him.

‘Child!

Why have you

Treated us

Like this?

Look!

Your father

And I

Have been searching

For you anxiously!’”

 

καὶ ἰδόντες αὐτὸν ἐξεπλάγησαν, καὶ εἶπεν πρὸς αὐτὸν ἡ μήτηρ αὐτοῦ Τέκνον, τί ἐποίησας ἡμῖν οὕτως; ἰδοὺ ὁ πατήρ σου κἀγὼ ὀδυνώμενοι ζητοῦμέν σε

 

Luke continued by saying his parents were also astonished at Jesus.  However, his mother, Mary, was also a little upset.  Luke said that when his parents saw Jesus (καὶ ἰδόντες αὐτὸν), they were also astonished or shocked (ἐξεπλάγησαν).  His mother said to Jesus (καὶ εἶπεν πρὸς αὐτὸν ἡ μήτηρ αὐτοῦ) that she wanted to know why he, this young child (Τέκνον), had did this to them or treated them like this (τί ἐποίησας ἡμῖν οὕτως).  She and his father had been distressed, pained, or anxious while searching for him (ἰδοὺ ὁ πατήρ σου κἀγὼ ὀδυνώμενοι ζητοῦμέν σε).  Why had he not told them what he was going to do?  He had caused them a lot of problems over the last few days.

 

The amazing Jesus (Lk 2:47-2:47)

“All who heard him

Were amazed

At his understanding

And his answers.”

 

ἐξίσταντο δὲ πάντες οἱ ἀκούοντες αὐτοῦ ἐπὶ τῇ συνέσει καὶ ταῖς ἀποκρίσεσιν αὐτοῦ.

 

Luke made a comment that will be often repeated here and in all the other gospel stories about how people were amazed or marveled at Jesus.  He said that everyone, especially these religious teachers in Jerusalem, who heard this 12-year-old Jesus was amazed or astonished (ἐξίσταντο δὲ πάντες οἱ ἀκούοντες αὐτοῦ) at his understanding or intellect (ἐπὶ τῇ συνέσει) and his answers (καὶ ταῖς ἀποκρίσεσιν αὐτοῦ).  He was a bright kid for his age.  What else would you expect from Jesus?  The idea of a brilliant youth was common among all ancient heroes.  However, the gospel writers were restrained in this area, since this is the only canonical story or episode about the young Jesus.