The Gospel passion narratives

All the four historical canonical gospel stories have passion narratives with different perspectives within the four accounts.  These gospel stories are a mix of history, facts, and interpretations that represents the true experience of the early Christian followers of Jesus, the primitive Christian community.  The gospels contain history remembered, but this history includes an interpretation.  In a certain sense, this is prophecy historicized.  For the followers of Christ, the Jesus story is a true story that represents something that happened in our world.

 

The king asks Daniel to interpret this dream (Dan 4:18-4:18)

“‘This is the dream

That I,

King Nebuchadnezzar,

Saw.

Now you!

O Belteshazzar!

Declare the interpretation!

All the wise men

Of my kingdom

Are unable

To tell me

The interpretation.

However,

You are able!

You are endowed

With a spirit

Of the holy gods!’”

King Nebuchadnezzar had described his dream to Daniel. Now, he wanted Belteshazzar, Daniel, to given him an interpretation. All the wise men of his kingdom of Babylon were not able to give him an interpretation. However, Daniel, or Belteshazzar, was an able man endowed with the spirit of the holy gods. Daniel had some sort of divine power to interpret dreams, as was seen earlier in this work.

The king called all his wise men (Dan 4:6-4:7)

“Therefore,

I made a decree

That all the wise men

Of Babylon

Should be brought

Before me.

Thus,

They might tell me

The interpretation

Of the dream.

Then the magicians,

The enchanters,

The Chaldeans,

The diviners,

Came in.

I told them

The dream.

But they could not

Tell me

Its interpretation.”

Continuing with the first-person singular, the king called all the wise men of Babylon. He wanted them all to come to him to give him an interpretation of his dream. Thus, he called for the Babylonian magicians, the enchanters, the Chaldeans, and the diviners. However, none of them could give him an interpretation of his dream. He, at least, told them the dream this time.

Daniel went to Arioch (Dan 2:24-2:24)

“Therefore,

Daniel went to Arioch.

The king

Had appointed him

To destroy

The wise men

Of Babylon.

Daniel said to him.

‘Do not destroy

The wise men

Of Babylon.

Bring me in

Before the king.

I will give

The king

The interpretation.’”

Daniel then went to Arioch, the man in charge of the execution of the Babylonian wise men. He told Arioch not to destroy these wise men. He wanted Arioch to bring him to the king, so that he could give the king an interpretation of his dream.

The response of Daniel (Dan 2:14-2:16)

“Then Daniel responded

With prudence,

As well as discretion,

To Arioch,

The king’s chief executor.

Arioch had gone out

To execute

The wise men

Of Babylon.

Daniel asked Arioch,

The royal official.

‘Why is the decree

Of the king

So severe?’

Then Arioch explained

The matter

To Daniel.

Thus,

Daniel went in

To see the king.

He requested

That the king

Give him time.

He would tell the king

The interpretation.”

Daniel was less confrontational, since he was prudent and discrete. He met the king’s chief executor, Arioch, the royal official in charge of the execution of these wise men. Daniel wanted to know what was going on. Why was the king so severe to these wise men of Babylon? After Arioch explained the situation to Daniel, Daniel decided to go to see the king himself. He told the king that he needed more time, but that he would provide an interpretation for the king’s dream.