The second part of the Lord’s prayer (Mt 6:11-6:13)

“Give us

Our daily bread

Today!

Forgive us

Our debts!

We also have forgiven

Our debtors.

Do not bring us

Into the time of trial!

Rescue us

From the evil one!

 

Τὸν ἄρτον ἡμῶν τὸν ἐπιούσιον δὸς ἡμῖν σήμερον

καὶ ἄφες ἡμῖν τὰ ὀφειλήματα ἡμῶν, ὡς καὶ ἡμεῖς ἀφήκαμεν τοῖς ὀφειλέταις ἡμῶν·

καὶ μὴ εἰσενέγκῃς ἡμᾶς εἰς πειρασμόν, ἀλλὰ ῥῦσαι ἡμᾶς ἀπὸ τοῦ πονηροῦ.

 

In the second part of the “Lord’s Prayer,” “The Our Father,” Matthew and Luke, chapter 11:3-4, have the 4 human petitions, perhaps indicating a common Q source.  We should ask the Father to give us (δὸς ἡμῖν) our daily bread or sustenance to sustain our human life (Τὸν ἄρτον ἡμῶν τὸν ἐπιούσιον) today (σήμερον).  Every day, even today, we need our daily nutrition to live.  The hope is that God the Father will provide for us.  We should ask the Father to forgive our debts (καὶ ἄφες ἡμῖν τὰ ὀφειλήματα ἡμῶν).  This includes whatever we owe to God, because our sins that have put us in debt with God.  If we ask for forgiveness, that assumes that we have forgiven our debtors (ὡς καὶ ἡμεῖς ἀφήκαμεν τοῖς ὀφειλέταις ἡμῶν).  We ask the Father not to lead us into temptation or be tested in a trial (καὶ μὴ εἰσενέγκῃς ἡμᾶς εἰς πειρασμόν).  Finally, we ask the Father to rescue or deliver us from painful evil or the evil one (ἀλλὰ ῥῦσαι ἡμᾶς ἀπὸ τοῦ πονηροῦ).  A Byzantine manuscript has an addition here that has become popular as the ending of the Lord’s Prayer because it has an “Amen” at the end of it.  “For the kingdom (Ὅτι σοῦ ἐστιν ἡ βασιλεία) and the power (καὶ ἡ δύναμις) and the glory (καὶ ἡ δόξα) are yours forever. Amen (εἰς τοὺς αἰῶνας. Ἀμήν).”  This would have fit in better after the first 3 petitions about God the Father, since these 4 petitions are about us here on earth.

The words of the alliance (Jer 11:3-11:5)

“‘Cursed be anyone

Who does not heed the words

Of this covenant

That I commanded your ancestors,

When I brought them

Out of the land of Egypt,

From the iron furnace,

Saying,

‘Listen to my voice!

Do all that I command you!

So shall you be my people!

I will be your God!

Thus I may perform the oath

That I swore to your ancestors.

‘I will give them a land

Flowing with milk and honey,

As it is until this day.’

Then I answered.

‘So be it, Yahweh!”

Here are the words that Yahweh wanted Jeremiah to proclaim to his people. Anyone who does not heed the words of this commanded covenant will be cursed. Yahweh had brought their ancestors out of the land of Egypt that was like an iron blast furnace. Jeremiah was to be clear. They were to follow his commands. They will be his people and he will be their God. Yahweh had sworn this to their ancestors since he said that he would provide a promised land of milk and honey. Jeremiah responded that he was up to the task as he said the famous Amen, or so be it.

Praise Yahweh (Ps 106:48-106:48)

“Blessed be Yahweh!

The God of Israel!

From everlasting to everlasting!

Let all the people say.

‘Amen!’

Praise Yahweh!”

This 4th book of psalms ends with a rousing Alleluia, praise to Yahweh, the Hebrew “Hallelujah.” This doxology praise is an addition to this psalm since it probably belonged at the end of Psalm 105. However, it seems a fitting end to this book of psalms with this everlasting praise to Yahweh with the great “Amen.”

Blessed be Yahweh (Ps 72:18-72:19)

“Blessed be Yahweh!

The God of Israel!

He alone does wondrous things.

Blessed be his glorious name forever!

May his glory fill the whole earth!

Amen and Amen!”

This psalm naturally ends with a cry of blessing to Yahweh, the God of Israel. He alone has done wondrous things. Clearly Yahweh is superior to the king. The glory and name of Yahweh should last forever and fill the whole earth. This seems to add to the preceding verses that made the king seem almost divine. This was a reminder that Yahweh was the only God of Israel, not the king. This psalm ends with the rousing “Amen” twice.

Doxology end to the first book (Ps 41:13-41:13)

“Blessed be Yahweh!

The God of Israel!

From everlasting to everlasting!

Amen and Amen.”

There is a shout out to Yahweh. As the end of this psalm, this praise of Yahweh closes out the first book of psalms. He was and is the God of Israel forever. The response of all, like the great ending of all doxologies or prayers to God is “Amen, Amen.”

The praise for Judith (Jdt 15:8-15:10)

“Then the high priest Joakim, and the elders of the Israelites who lived in Jerusalem, came to witness the good things that the Lord had done for Israel. They wanted to see Judith and wish her well. When they met her, they all blessed her with one accord. They said to her.

‘You are the glory of Jerusalem!

You are the great boast of Israel!

You are the great pride of our nation!

You have done all this with your own hand.

You have done great good to Israel.

God is well pleased with it.

May the Almighty Lord bless you forever!’

All the people said. ‘Amen.’”

The high priest Joakim and the Israelite elders came to see Judith and wish her well. They blessed her. They called her, the glory of Jerusalem, the great boast of Israel, the pride of their nation. She did all this by herself. God was well pleased with her. She should be blessed forever. Of course, all the people chimed in with ‘Amen.’ This praise rests heavily on Judith rather than God.