The other side of the sea (Lk 8:22-8:22)

“One day,

Jesus

Got into a boat

With his disciples.

He said to them.

‘Let us go across

To the other side

Of the lake.’

Thus,

They set out.”

 

Ἐγένετο δὲ ἐν μιᾷ τῶν ἡμερῶν καὶ αὐτὸς ἐνέβη εἰς πλοῖον καὶ οἱ μαθηταὶ αὐτοῦ, καὶ εἶπεν πρὸς αὐτούς Διέλθωμεν εἰς τὸ πέραν τῆς λίμνης· καὶ ἀνήχθησαν.

 

Luke said that one day (Ἐγένετο δὲ ἐν μιᾷ τῶν ἡμερῶν), Jesus got into a boat (καὶ αὐτὸς ἐνέβη εἰς πλοῖον) with his disciples (καὶ οἱ μαθηταὶ αὐτοῦ).  He said to them (καὶ εἶπεν πρὸς αὐτούς) that he wanted to go across to the other side of the lake (Διέλθωμεν εἰς τὸ πέραν τῆς λίμνης).  Thus, they set out (καὶ ἀνήχθησαν).  Something similar to this short episode of Jesus telling his disciples to travel across the sea can also be found in Mark, chapter 4:35-36.  Mark said that at the end of the day, when evening came, Jesus told his disciples that he wanted them to cross over to the other side of the Sea of Galilee from Capernaum.  However, Mark added that Jesus dismissed the crowds.  Then he and his disciples got into a couple of boats.  Thus, there was a small group of boats crossing the Sea of Galilee.  Matthew, chapter 8:23, had the simple statement that Jesus got into the boat with his disciples.  Have you ever gone across a sea or a lake on a boat?

Jesus traveled to the other side (Mk 8:13-8:13)

“Jesus left them.

He got into

The boat again.

He went across

To the other side.”

 

καὶ ἀφεὶς αὐτοὺς πάλιν ἐμβὰς ἀπῆλθεν εἰς τὸ πέραν.

 

This a unique but yet common phrase of Mark.  Jesus left an ambiguous them (καὶ ἀφεὶς αὐτοὺς), without indicating that it was the Pharisees or a crowd.  Then he embarked on the boat again (πάλιν ἐμβὰς).  He went across to the other side (ἀπῆλθεν εἰς τὸ πέραν).  Jesus leaving by way of a boat to cross the Sea of Galilee was a predominant theme of Mark.  Quite often, it was with an unclear destination, just across the sea, or the other side as here.

The flowing water leads to a river (Ezek 47:3-47:5)

“Going on eastward,

With a cord in his hand,

The man measured

One thousand cubits.

Then he led me

Through the water.

It was ankle-deep.

Again,

He measured

One thousand cubits.

He led me

Through the water.

It was knee-deep.

Again,

He measured

One thousand cubits.

He led me

Through the water.

It was up to the waist.

Again,

He measured

One thousand cubits.

It was a river

That I could not cross.

The water had risen.

It was deep enough

To swim in,

A river

That could not be crossed.”

The bronze man took a cord and started to measure the flowing water from the Temple. For the first 1,000 cubits or 1,500 feet, or a little over a quarter mile, the water was only ankle-deep. He then led Ezekiel across this small stream. However, the next measured 1,000 cubits or quarter mile, the water was knee high. Once again, he led Ezekiel across this knee-high water. After the 3rd measurement of 1,000 cubits or over a quarter mile, the water was waist high. Ezekiel then waded through this waist-high water. Finally, after another 1,000 cubits or another quarter mile, it was a mighty river that Ezekiel could not cross, except by swimming, because it was so deep. Thus, there was a river, a little over a mile from the eastern gate of the Temple.

The battle at the Jordan River (1 Macc 9:47-9:49)

“So the battle began. Jonathan stretched out his hand to strike Bacchides, but he eluded him and went to the rear. Then Jonathan and the men with him leaped into the Jordan River. They swam across to the other side. The enemy did not cross the Jordan to attack them. About one thousand of Bacchides’ men fell that day.”

The battle began as Jonathan tried to strike Bacchides, but he was unsuccessful as Bacchides went to the rear of his army. Then Jonathan told his men to jump in the Jordan River and swim to the other side. However, General Bacchides did not follow them since his men had suffered the death of 1,000 men that day.