Jesus was troubled (Jn 12:27-12:27)

“Now my soul is troubled.

What should I say?

‘Father!

Save me from this hour!

No!

It is for this reason

I have come

To this hour.’”

νῦν ἡ ψυχή μου τετάρακται, καὶ τί εἴπω; Πάτερ, σῶσόν με ἐκ τῆς ὥρας ταύτης. ἀλλὰ διὰ τοῦτο ἦλθον εἰς τὴν ὥραν ταύτην.

Then John indicated, like the synoptics in their passion narratives, that Jesus said that his soul or life (νῦν ἡ ψυχή μου) was troubled (τετάρακται).  Should he say (καὶ τί εἴπω) to the Father (Πάτερ) to save him (σῶσόν με) from this hour (ἐκ τῆς ὥρας ταύτης)?  The response was no because that was the reason (ἀλλὰ διὰ τοῦτο) that he came (ἦλθον) to this hour (εἰς τὴν ὥραν ταύτην).  Mark, chapter 14:33-36, indicated that Jesus said that he was very sorrowful or deeply grieved (Περίλυπός ἐστιν ἡ ψυχή μου), even unto death (ἕως θανάτου).  Mark recounted that Jesus threw himself on the ground (ἔπιπτεν ἐπὶ τῆς γῆς).  Then he prayed (καὶ προσηύχετο).  He said that he wondered if it was possible (ἵνα εἰ δυνατόν ἐστιν) that this hour might pass from him or be disregarded (παρέλθῃ ἀπ’ αὐτοῦ ἡ ὥρα).  Jesus prayed directly to his Father, using the Aramaic “Abba” (καὶ ἔλεγεν Ἀββᾶ ὁ Πατήρ).  Anything was possible with the Father (πάντα δυνατά σοι).  He wanted the Father to remove or take away this cup of suffering from him (παρένεγκε τὸ ποτήριον τοῦτο ἀπ’ ἐμοῦ).  However, he was willing to do whatever the Father wanted, because his will was second to his Father (ἀλλ’ οὐ τί ἐγὼ θέλω ἀλλὰ τί σύ).  Clearly, Jesus subordinated his will to the will of his heavenly Father.  Matthew, chapter 26:38-39, like Mark, said that Jesus began to be grieved, pained, sorrowful, troubled, distressed, and agitated (ἤρξατο λυπεῖσθαι καὶ ἀδημονεῖν), showing the vulnerability of Jesus in his suffering.  Then Jesus said that his soul was very sorrowful, deeply grieved (Περίλυπός ἐστιν ἡ ψυχή μου), even unto death (ἕως θανάτου).  Jesus fell on his face (ἔπεσεν ἐπὶ πρόσωπον αὐτοῦ), throwing himself on the ground.  Then he prayed to his Father (προσευχόμενος καὶ λέγων Πάτερ μου).  He said that he wondered if it was possible (εἰ δυνατόν ἐστιν) that this drinking cup could pass from him or be disregarded (παρελθάτω ἀπ’ ἐμοῦ τὸ ποτήριον τοῦτο).  However, he was willing to do whatever the Father wanted, because his will was second to his Father (πλὴν οὐχ ὡς ἐγὼ θέλω ἀλλ’ ὡς σύ).  Luke, chapter 22:42 indicated that Jesus called his Father (λέγων Πάτερ).  He said that if he was willing (εἰ βούλει), he would rather have this cup removed from him (παρένεγκε τοῦτο τὸ ποτήριον ἀπ’ ἐμοῦ).  However, Jesus said that it was not his will (πλὴν μὴ τὸ θέλημά μου), but the will of the Father that should be done (ἀλλὰ τὸ σὸν γινέσθω).  Here in John, this saying did not take place at the agony in the garden, but within a different context.  What kind of suffering have you had?

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