Andrew told Simon (Jn 1:41-1:41)

“Andrew first found

His own brother

Simon.

He said to him.

‘We have found

The Messiah.’

This is translated

As the anointed one,

Christ.”

εὑρίσκει οὗτος πρῶτον τὸν ἀδελφὸν τὸν ἴδιον Σίμωνα καὶ λέγει αὐτῷ Εὑρήκαμεν τὸν Μεσσίαν (ὅ ἐστιν μεθερμηνευόμενον Χριστός).

John alone had this portrayal of Andrew, the disciple of John the Baptist who now followed Jesus.  The first thing (πρῶτον) that Andrew did was find (εὑρίσκει οὗτος) his own brother Simon (τὸν ἀδελφὸν τὸν ἴδιον Σίμωνα).  He was not called Simon Peter (Σίμωνος Πέτρου) as in the preceding verse.  Andrew then told his brother Simon (καὶ λέγει αὐτῷ) that they had found (Εὑρήκαμεν) the Messiah (τὸν Μεσσίαν), which was a transliteration of the Aramaic meshiba.  John was the only Greek biblical writer who used this word.  Since this writing was meant for a Greek audience, this biblical author took the Aramaic Hebrew transliteration word and translated it as Christ, (ὅ ἐστιν μεθερμηνευόμενον Χριστός), which means the anointed one.  Notice that Andrew said that “we” had found the Christ, indicating the other unnamed apostle, whom Simon might have known as John the son of Zebedee.  How do you get along with your brother?

9 thoughts on “Andrew told Simon (Jn 1:41-1:41)

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